Track Day Car under $40k

Howdy folks, looking for recommendations on a car to take to the racetrack for track days. Pretty much the only consideration is how fast it will go around the track. Must also be road legal etc

Max budget $40k … but if i could find something close in terms of speed for $20k or less even better

EDIT: also needs to be manual and be fairly spacious as i aint small

Comments

        • +2 votes

          I want that NASCAR soooo bad. But at that price, too much for a toy. Nothing better than touching other cars up on track days and sayin'… "yeah, I didn't slam into you, or bump into you, or nudge you, I rubbed you… and rubbin's racin'…"

    • +3 votes

      Agree. A day at the track and things wear and tear increase drastically and you are never satisfied with performance because you want comfort/drivability.

      I recall some guys at the track calling themselves OFRT (Old Fart Race Team). They use to buy old bombs and strip anything unnecessary off, roll cage it and off to the track on a trailer. This is as budget as it got from what I've seen.

      • +2 votes

        Just break things, turn your pride and joy into a shitbox. Totally ruin your car, better off buying a proper race car that is designed to be raced.

    •  

      Perhaps give us some figures on this "Maintenance" costs….? I'm guessing you've broken a lot of cars racing them?

      • +3 votes

        Depends on the car and how hard you push it, some numbers;

        Cost me $1K per event all up just to compete on street tyres. People can do it cheaper by buying set of R spec tyres and race pads that you swap at the track, thats $3K in bits per season.

        You're still not competitive, thats not including any performance and maintenance mods. So want better radiator, better pads, performance fluids that you will change before and after the event. Engine and transmission coolers recommended.

        Breakages,
        Sky is the limit here highly dependant on the car and how hard you push.

        Built WRX motor is $9K (that is cheap), bottom end for a GT3 is $40K alone. Point of failure for WRX was drivetrain, so clutches, CVs and gearboxes. STI was recommend due to durability of the drivetrain and brakes.Seen a few open days people running out of talent at Eastern Creek, brand new EVO8 totalled, so that $60K+, insurance does not cover racetracks.

        Then factor in wear and tear on the car. Lot of the clubsport cars are just beat up, terrible to drive with worn engine and drive trains, that rattle, clunk, loose throughout. Thats why I say buy a race car thats built for the purpose rather than reinvent the wheel by ruining a perfectly nice street car.

        But if you're still feeling need for speed, recommend driver training days at local track. These are far less punishing on the car and still lot of fun, so you will be more ready if you decide to do motor sport more seriously. Id actually recommend to to anyone with a performance car, not only fun but makes you a much safer driver.

        •  

          Well, lets say you just drive normally to get a feel for the track, and then later push it as much as you can to see how fast the car goes on it and whether or not it has any issues by sending it off….and then meet some randoms who wants to race you and then you both race each other….until someone gives up or crashes…

          OH I'm guessing the tyres dont last that long on the tracks…

          You're still not competitive, thats not including any performance and maintenance mods. So want better radiator, better pads, performance fluids that you will change before and after the event. Engine and transmission coolers recommended.

          Hmm, I see…

          Built WRX motor is $9K (that is cheap), bottom end for a GT3 is $40K alone. Point of failure for WRX was drivetrain, so clutches, CVs and gearboxes. STI was recommend due to durability of the drivetrain and brakes.Seen a few open days people running out of talent at Eastern Creek, brand new EVO8 totalled, so that $60K+, insurance does not cover racetracks.

          I'm guessing breakages happen every race? And would cost minimum 10k and up?

          Damn that guy's brand new evo8 totalled…im guessing he flipped it? What about comprehensive insurance? Surely that covers everything related to the car….?

          But if you're still feeling need for speed, recommend driver training days at local track. These are far less punishing on the car and still lot of fun, so you will be more ready if you decide to do motor sport more seriously. Id actually recommend to to anyone with a performance car, not only fun but makes you a much safer driver.

          So what do you do here? Just cruise relaxingly on the track at 300km/hr?

          •  

            @Zachary: tyres dont last at all, not at those speeds.

            breakage unpredictable but harder you push the more expensive things become.

            EVO8 total loss, insurance is void on a racetrack. that why lots take their plates off when racing. No lift off oversteer, bad thing with AWD cars, spun and hit a wall. car was totaled.

            max speed is probably 200kph on a given straight. most tracks be in the 90 to 180kph range.

            Dont need to go full tilt, I didnt give a $#!t about times, I just focused on lines and having fun. Best time I had on the track was my slowest in the rain when had the car sideways every turn like WRC

            •  

              @Bid Sniper: so why can't you do 300km/hr or more on a straight track?

              So taking plates off and then crashing and then claiming insurance?

              Yeah I need to get on the track someday……probably should start with that training days thing you mentioned….experience for myself…hahaha…

    •  

      Not if he goes with an I30N , warranty on and off the track from hyundai.

      its definitely not a race car but they are pretty capable.

      • +3 votes

        Do not confuse warranty with insurance. If you have an off and hit a wall or rip out part of the suspension, you're paying for that, thats part of breakages. Accelerated wear and tear you're paying for that too. Post and pre track maintenance, yep you're paying too.

        The terms in the i30 warranty only seem to apply to non speed events like driver training, which I suggested everyone doing since isn't harsh on the car anyway. Any timed events you're voiding the warranty, definitely not what people think, read the fine print!

        https://www.hyundai.co.nz/terms-and-conditions/i30n-track-wa...

        i30N TRACK WARRANTY TERMS AND CONDITIONS

        The warranty cover for the i30 N model is, as per current warranty - 3 years / 100,000 km whichever comes first (Manufacture's Warranty)

        i30 N – Track Warranty

        “Race Events”, racing or the like is excluded and not covered under manufacture's warranty. Note - Definition of a RACE - A competition between other (vehicles) to see which is the fastest in covering a set course.
        Monitored “Track Events / Track Playday” are covered by manufacturer's warranty. Note - Definition of a TRACK Event / Track Playday:
        An organised event in which drivers can drive in a controlled, non-racing environment around an established circuit.
        Qualified driving instructors are on hand to coach and advise on vehicle and driving safety.
        May include a theory session on safety
        No speed restrictions
        “Racing” is not permitted
        Drivers have a valid driver’s licence
        The vehicle is road-legal (with current WOF)
        The vehicle is NOT modified in any way for said event (see below)
        However, should the owner fit or do any of the following:

        Non OEM tyres / slicks
        Non Hyundai New Zealand endorsed rims
        Non genuine brake materials including rotors
        Alter the suspension
        Alter the engine ECU / mapping
        Fitted a roll cage
        Modified or altered the intake or exhaust; fitted a non-genuine exhaust
        Fitted a non-genuine clutch
        The manufacture's warranty on the above components and or systems is void.

        Normal wear & tear conditions apply for; brakes, clutch and OEM tyres etc.

        •  

          Thanks for the write-up Bid , i always wondered what the conditions were and now i know , much appreciated.

          Basically just what i thought it was , non competitive use and running a stock car around the track in untimed events. i.e casual track days or driver training.

          It was pretty obvious for any external damage the owner would be up for costs in that regard.

          It was the type of driving i thought OP had in mind when he made the post , if its anything different then its completely off the cards but for your average person with a 40k budget who wants to race/daily the same car its a no brainer to get the I30N if his intentions were as aforementioned.

          Enjoy your day.

  • +1 vote

    I30N the warranty even cover for track…..

    •  

      I'm 175cm and the headroom was pretty tight even for me in the I30N.

      • +2 votes

        Is the i30N really that much different to a regular i30? I have an i30SR and am 193cm… no headroom problems

        •  

          I’m not sure, I’ve only ever sat in the i30N… seemed that the sunroof lowered the headroom around it.

      •  

        Was the seat able to be lowered?

        •  

          Yeah, I’d lowered it all the way…

      • +1 vote

        Really? That doesn't seem right. Taller than you and drove last week no problems. Can't imagine having an issue with a helmet either.

        •  

          I’ve got a longer torso than my height would suggest, I only sat in the car… and it was one of the first ones in the country… it was at Phillip Island at MotoGP or WSBK… maybe they’ve changed things since that model?

          I wasn’t touching the headlining but I wouldn’t be able to wear a helmet and clear it… maybe with a bit of seat adjustment/compromise it would be ok.

          This was a while ago and just my observation in one with a sunroof… do they all have sunroof? It seemed to lower the headroom.

      •  

        cut off the roof make it convertible…

    •  

      I personally wouldnt recommend a front wheel drive if your primary use is track.

  • +1 vote

    as everyone says, start cheap and then upgrade if you really like it. im 6"2 in an MX5 and bolt the seat to the floor and all good.

    learn track stills in a slowish car first. my MX5 does 1:17 around wakefeild going 10/10ths. a good driver in my car could maybe do 1:15. very fun being able to drive on the limit. ive been 1:14 in a mates car and it felt like another world. mates have BMW M3 doing 1:10 and i cant imagine what that felt like.

    BRZ if you need "rear seats"

    both are easily enough to turbo when you want to start spending cash on them. easy in the 20k ballpark

  •  

    I'm surprised no-one mentioned a Toyota MR2. Great little fun cars on the track, just watch out for the snap oversteer.

    • +5 votes

      they seem like a dogs breakfast to work on. check out MCM on the one they had. scared me sober.

  • +1 vote

    VW Golf R (obv not new, but you could get pretty new for $40k)… they're deceivingly spacious inside, come in manual, and would be quicker around a track than an MX5, BRZ or WRX (maybe not STI?)

    I had a Mazda 3 MPS before my current GTI and would get Golf R before MPS again.

  •  

    Definitely a Volvo.

  • +1 vote

    MX-5 is the true ozbargain trackday car

    Compared to even other cheap Japanese sports cars all the wearing parts will last longer and are cheaper/easier to replace when they do wear out. Partly because the car is extremely light and it's built from the start to be able to take the abuse.

    Trackdays are really hard on cars, so expect to be going through lots of tyres, brake pads, brake discs, and lots of fluid changes.

  • +2 votes

    A pro go-kart. More fun and much cheaper (for everything related to racing and maintenance).

    https://youtu.be/gTBCLQS-Ahg

  • +1 vote

    OP said "the only consideration is how fast it will go around the track"

    Based on my own experience with various cars on race tracks, for your first circa 40K track-day car with fast lap times as the main objective, IMO it should be a relatively light high-powered AWD used sports car like the STi, Evo, Focus RS and so forth. Get a set of good semi slicks and adjust the suspension settings, then find someone to show you how to drive it on the track. For obvious reasons, don't buy a brand new car and take it to the track straight away.

    Later on if you can double or triple your budget, a used R35 GT-R does great lap times in stock condition too. Double or triple your budget again, you can start looking at a 911 Turbo (AWD) or a GT3 (RWD).

    • +3 votes

      I can't recommend the Focus RS for heavy track use , the EPAS (electric power assist steering) shut off on a track day i did and thankfully i didn't slam into another person or a wall at high speed and got sent off onto the grass.

      Took it to ford and they basically said "it would cost us thousands to replace the power steering rack , we detected the system overheat and "shut off" to protect itself (the car) , we could but you could then take it on another track day and have the same issue happen" - basically we are not footing the bill and we don't care about your safety and well being - Ford Australia.

      Sold it a month later to some unfortunate soul to which my thoughts and prayers are with him.

      Hilarious thing is , i am not a competitive track day driver and was not even going 10/10ths with it and the Ford Focus RS was literally unveiled at eastern creek (it is basically a glorified rally/track car to an extent) and Ford didn't give a single (profanity).

      Good luck to anyone who owns one , on the street they sound good and the torque is addictive but i don't miss the turning circle of a bus where you need 4-5 points to do a 3 point turn , near impossible to do a full u-turn down an empty street lock to lock.

      Compulsory edit: if anyone is ever contemplating tracking their Ford Focus RS (or you have mates that do) , you would be playing Russian roulette with you and your car's life. i would highly recommend installing a cooling duct for the EPAS motor and pray that it never shuts off on you mid corner like it did to me.

  • +1 vote

    I30N?? Going on track doesn't void warranty.

  •  

    Should be able to get a Focus RS for just under $40k. Brilliant for the track and practical too.

  •  

    Do you actually have 40k to spend? For your first year, I would probably not invest heavily in the vehicle.

    For example, I was so sure I wanted to do our local hill climb for a whole season. I got my CAMS licence a helmet, did all the mods to my car to make it track legal (fire extinguisher etc) and I did a total of…. one event.

    My advice would be to buy a slowish, manual, cheap car with modding capability. Anything from Subaru would be a good bet, as they are lego cars and you can get parts from literally anywhere. If you actually end up doing your 4/5 track days next year, then hell yeah go out and buy a brand new 86 and send it.

  • +1 vote

    Buy a second hand 86/brz. Use the remaining funds for future modifications as you get more seat time, and maintenance/track day costs.

  • +2 votes

    you missed out on the recent yaris GR deal 39,990 drive away

  •  

    If new, i30N as untimed track days will not void warranty.

    Otherwise used Toyota 86/BRZ or MX5.

  •  

    Will reiterate the MX5. You can buy older example for 8-15k and mod the hell out of it. Or go turbo if you can find them(a bit rarer but where's the fun in that. Stick in your own turbo!)

    Still loads of fun non turbo.

    Have a look now as I notice the prices have been rising and second hand stock reducing.

    And keep it in classic British Racing Green or Black.

  • +4 votes

    I'm surprised that no one has yet suggested Ayrton Senna's Monaco Winning 1993 McLaren-Ford MP4/8A.

    It's a little bit above your budget but it would pull some absolutely cracking track times, and leave all those MX5s and 86s in the dust.

    If it's good enough to win the 1993 Monaco Grand Prix, it should be good enough for your purposes - https://retroracecars.com/f1-car-for-sale-1993-mclaren-ford-...

  • +4 votes

    Honestly having owned a track car and assuming you are in to working on cars, don't get something road legal unless you are trailering it there anyway.

    Time and time again I see cars blow up and people left begging for tows from all corners back to a major city. Any car you drive on the street you will end up wanting to enjoy on the street and making it a proper track car will ruin or hinder one side of the coin.

    Buying a cheap racecar and modifying it, going ham without worry is a much better choice. I would look at an evo 7-8 as they aren't crazy prices yet and are some of the best track cars ever made with a plethora of aftermarket support.

    •  

      Probably the most logical response I have read.

      Having owned a DCR2 and a WRX G3 2013, I had enough issues/bills with both cars using them as a daily to put me off track use

      Besides the maintenance cost for track use, insurance was another reason I didn't take my cars to track.

      I have friends who tooi their daily cars to track and even the relatively short amount of time the cars had to be taken to the shop for inevitable repairs was inconvenient enough since it was their daily.

      Not too sure why OP needs to be street legal but I hope he doesn't plan to use it as a daily.

      •  

        Exactly, the big barrier is having access to a tow car and a trailer.

        We rent trailers for around $100-150/weekend and bought a cheap petrol Pajero for about 5k. If I were to do it again, I would buy something like a VF SS wagon or similar and use that as a daily/tow car.

  •  

    Toyota Echo

  •  

    Golf R - either MK6 and a big bucket of cash to modify, or MK7.

  •  

    The faster you go, the quicker you wear out stuff like tyres, brakes and suspension, ie $$. And the more important those things become so no OzBargaining, ie $$. And the bigger the mess if something goes wrong ie. $$.

    Unless you're the next temporarily embarrassed Lewis Hamilton, then you are better off getting something common, slower, and cheaper. You will get a lot more use out of it for a lot less money. So stick to MX5 or 86.

    • +3 votes

      Agree 100% - R compound tyres, floating rotors, race pads, e85… all that stuff adds up and gets fairly expensive.

      Now use a Toyota Echo Sportivo as my trackcar, it's cheap to buy and cheap to maintain.
      Performance street tyres, decent brake pads, rotors, coilovers, and some oil and you're good to go.
      One tank of petrol gets me to the track, around the track and back home.
      I find that I was able to get more trackdays in per year as my maintance cost were slashed significantly, seat time will make you a better driver than a fast car.

      •  

        I assume youve watched Bargain Racement?
        https://youtu.be/OkoCuKOSpeo

        I would do the same as you if it were me, but oldmate doesnt sound like they type who would be interested in learning actual racecraft. Thats why I suggested MX5 or 86 for the RWD poser "purity".

        But a cheap FWD like yours would be perfect for most people who actually want to learn how to drive a car fast.

  •  

    https://www.pickles.com.au/damaged-salvage/item/search#!/search-result?q=(And.State.NSW._.ProductType.Vehicles.)

    Maybe something here?

  • +1 vote

    Skyline R34 GTT if the the GTR is out of the budget! Great cars!

    • +1 vote

      Until he gets sick of getting pulled over for defect checks

  • +3 votes

    600cc motorbike. Youll have more fun for less money. But if youre stuck on a car maybe an e36/46 m3

  • +3 votes

    S2000

    •  

      Had an S2K on my Red P's before they banned it , good times. so much nostalgia. one of the best driver's cars this Vicennial. she wasn't the fastest but she was always a looker. they are becoming rarer and rarer these days.

  • +1 vote

    Cant go wrong with 86 brz. Reliable and cheap maintenance.

    And it is one of the very few cars that you can learn car control and become a faster driver.

    Mx5 /86/brz… these are momentum cars and you can achieve great lap times by going fast than most cars in the corners as you progress learn a lot of technical skills. And especially learning to recover from big slide or skid. Typically a lightweight rwd with lsd manual car.

    Otherwise, there are many other options that will achieve good lap times but you stay as a so so driver. These cars achieve lap times by accelerating really fast and then braking hard before corners, but with so so corner speed. Typically a turbo and heavy awd car.

    From my experience around 10 years of tracking using various different cars, fwd, awd, turbo, dsg, etc..

  • +1 vote

    I'd get an FN2 type R and keep the rest of the money. I drove one around a track years ago and it was tremendous. The k20 engine is well suited to track and is easily modded if you want more power.

    Being a Honda it won't break easily too.

    They are surprisingly roomy. I'm 185cm and fit comfortably in there with a helmet.

    •  

      +1 for the FN2 , had one. ride comfort is garbage but they handle ok , cluster display is still amazing , if i could go back in time i would of kept my EP3 even though i hated the gear shift location , unfortunately when you crossover into VTEC there isn't that much of a pull and it definitely feels slower then the EP3. unfortunately i share the same sentiments as Hammond from Top Gear on this one

    •  

      Not sure its easily modified to get more power with outgoing forced induction.

      The best bang for buck i got was via a hondata ECU flash but was still nothing special.

      Dont get me wrong, totally loved the high rev NA nature of the FN2 but if you want to speed around a track, I think there are better options out there

  •  

    If it needs to be spacious supercharge an old v8 falcon mate. Should leave you with some cash for some tyres and fluffy dice.

    •  

      Not to offend but for going around a track this car without a whole lot of work and even then would feel like a boat on wheels.

      Stick with a MX-5 or 86.

      I can see a few mx-5s for under 10k on carsales. I would snap one of them up and mod to your heart's content. Even stock will give you some fun around the track and ability to learn a few things.

  •  

    VW R32 Manual with pretty low K's should fall in the mid to low 20s.
    No other sound like it

  • +2 votes

    If you aren't mechanically minded, you'll likely find this a frustrating and expensive experience. Nothing more fun than something going wrong early in the day and you not being able to get back out there.

    Look into iracing and some top level simulation gear from Fanatec or Simcube along with a motion sim bolt-on and you can a simulated experience which is extremely close without the tears and put $25-30K back into your pocket.

    Either that, or learn to work on cars… YouTube is very helpful there and it's a great skill to have.

  •  

    Audi S3
    WRX
    Evo 10

    would be my choices

  •  

    BMW 130i manual. Can be had sub 20k easily. Hydraulic steering in pre 07 models, NA inline 6, decently reliable and incredibly fun/engaging to drive. Lots of track focussed mods available for them too, easily one of the best cars I’ve ever owned!

  • -2 votes

    Chrysler 300c ? not sure if prices went up .. I could have sworn you get these sub 20k.
    https://www.drive.com.au/car-sales/buy-used-cars/perth/chrys...

    • +6 votes

      That is the opposite of a track car.

      • +1 vote

        Precisely, 300C is more like a boat.

  •  

    Im selling my 2018 golf gti :) tempted?

  •  

    Abarth 595 Comp.

    •  

      "I'm 183cm and 100kg"

      He wouldnt fit

      •  

        He can easily fit. I own one of these. Similar height and around 75kgs.

  •  

    i can sell you a 2007 Mazda 3 MPS… still goes like a rocket :-).

  •  

    BRZ/86.

    Mighty Car Mods on YouTube show how fun this can be, you could build a weapon with your budget.

  •  

    I would say a turbo falcon or a V8 Commodore

    At the end of the day you're going to break things if you want it for the track

    Both of these you could find pretty heavily modified for that kind of price range

    With sticky tyres and decent suspension mods both these vehicles will move

  • +1 vote

    Suzuki swift sport or renault clio sport. I don't know as track cars but from memory they had really good reviews on their handling.

  •  

    Evo.

  • +1 vote

    I would reccomend watching some of SavageGeeses videos on some of the specific models you are considering. He often gets deep into the technical aspects of what you will need to change on each car to make it suitable for track.

    He is also a big advocate of Karting and has a strong belief that you will learn 10 times as much on a Kart track learning situational awareness then if you were just chasing laptimes by yourself.
    https://youtu.be/1bzcOr0VZUI

    Either way. $40,000 isnt much in the track car world. I would recommend staying Japanese and either get a MX5 if you fit (NC MX5 is way bigger), or if you want something different, a Clio 172/182 Cup (check out OZrenaultsport forum for more info on Renaults). Best option would be to find a good already built track MX5 or 86 for sale with a bunch of avaliable spares.

    Goodluck.

  • +5 votes

    I have both a NA MX-5 and a 2005 Renault Megane Cup. I race both of them at Symmons and baskerville raceway here in TAS.

    The Megane is stupid fast and a complete blast to drive. Excellent track times. But can be expensive as it burns though tyres and front shocks. Luckily the shocks aren't too expensive and quick to change. It is amazingly capable.

    The MX5 is old school and a lot slower. It generally doesn't have any failures and is far kinder on its mechanicals while enjoying a race day.

    But here is the kicker. The MX5 is the one that always leaves a huge smile on my face and makes me feel great after a hard day's racing. It is harder to get everything right in it, but the satisfaction of doing so makes it the more involved experience.

    Don't get me wrong, however. Both are fantastic cars at the track, and to live with as daily drivers too. They both put an instant smile on my face whenever I start them up and head for the hills.

    Don't be too worried about absolute speed and power. The faster you get, the more risk and costs are involved. Racing is about the smile factor. You scare yourself sometimes and have a little chuckle at yourself at times, but at the end of the day, the only person you are competing against is yourself.

    I'd go the MX5. You really cannot go wrong with one of them. Just be aware that the pre 91 models have a short nose crank which is a weak spot so do your research into that issue if looking at one between 89 and 91. Also Special Interest Rego is available on the NA's due to their age which makes them more attractive too. They also have no modern safety systems. No airbags, no ABS, no traction control. So you really do need to work on your skill set to get the most out of them. Think threshold braking and slip angles.

    With regards to concerns regarding French reliability, I've had the Megane Sport since new, and in that time I have had no mechanical or electrical issues. I'm nearing 200Km on it, and have just started to get the odd check injection warning which research tells me may be due to an injector failing which seems common at those klms. It is very rare though and could even be a tank of bad fuel. Brakes are rather expensive as you are advised to change both pads and discs at the same time, but the Brembo brakes have amazing feel and stopping power. Windscreens however are expensive. I've gone though three so far.

    Cheers,
    Carl

  •  

    Mx5 or s2000

  •  

    MX5 is the obvious choice, best out of the box adjustability, for camber etc. 86 as an alternate choice.

    If your budget is closer to 40k - id say start with a car you can get used for 20k, and then build it out for track, tires, wheels, brakes, half cage etc, which you can do more gradually and as per your taste.

    But depending on how much work you want to do, you could get away with other things, such as getting an older BMW and modding it could be really fun.

  •  

    WRX for sure. Cheap as chips for an older one and you have a wealth of STI and aftermarket parts available easily.

  • +2 votes

    Fiesta st.

    Heaps of fun. Super fun daily. Would make a great track car for the money.

  •  

    if you can find a Evo 8/8Mr, it is the ultimate car!

    manual box and only simple bolt on mods will make it fun, fast and reliable. already with great handling, good set of tyres and coilovers will do.

    all these new cars with paddle shift is just so boring!

  •  

    Easy. $30k on a BRZ + $10k on the SME turbo kit featured on MCM + good tyres.

  •  

    Wrx or evo if you want handling and a bit more room, skyline or 3000gt if you want some serious power, ford or holden if you want all power and no handling, m3 if you want handling and sliding, c/e63 if you want sliding you can barely control. There are so many to choose from. Every car is very different. Not everyone just wants to run a pure hot lap or do it with traction. Brakes are a big consideration if your going to run some serious laps.

  • +2 votes

    Base model Hyundai iLoad is the obvious choice here.

  •  

    Audi TT (8N) 225 quattro

    Cheap, Fast and reliable.

  •  

    FWD, RWD or AWD?

    They all handle differently and presents different levels of fun.

    Including maintenance or excluding maintenance? How much budget do you have for maintenance?

    I perfer RWD and will offer up; 135, e92 335, MX-5, s2k, 86.

    Difference also in high handling low power (skill), or high power lower handling (brute force + even more skill)

  • +1 vote

    peugeot 206 gti 180. 133kw with 1100kg kerb weight. Can be had for under 5k

  •  

    i30N, no question at that budget. All will be under warranty for a few years too.

  • -1 vote

    Well since reliability isn't a concern at all, E92 M3, E63 M6, E60 M5, or maybe a Jaguar XFR (As good as a BMW M5 according to Jeremy Clarkson).

    I mean, I can't really find anything else that will get close? If you want something that will get you to and from the track, like others have said, used Japanese sports car, latest MX-5 is a good choice, a well looked after BRZ or 86 is more practical because the boot should fit a set of race wheels/tyres that you can swap on and off.

    A45 AMG would be a hoot, they're getting close to 40 grand, WRX STIs are around 40k (older now).

  • +1 vote

    Wow no mention of Silvia's? Okay so I'll start. Anything with an SRDE engine (T) is a bonus. s13-15 will be in that bracket… Awesome drifting and engaging experience.

    They are definitely worth it…. I was just looking for jap cars to import the other day and check this out… Look at the Silvia section though.

    https://www.jdmauctionwatch.com/the-10-best-jdm-cars-you-can...

    Honourable mentions…. Mazda Rx7, Mitsubishi GTO, supra. (Original fast and furious cars)

    Don't want to go into am essay but there's a reason most of the cars in that above page are recommended for racing rather than the newer crap.
    Ps. I'm bias as had a Silvia when younger.

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    checked thread to see if someone said an MX-5. Saw it was the first reply. /thread

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    Everyone loves a sleeper like this $7000 Honda Insight conversion which beats lambos and corvettes:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JPcDiI5ufgI