Got Told off for Feeding Native Birds by Neighbours

Hi everyone.

I've just moved into my new house with my family 1 month ago where there are a lot of native birds around. I bought wild parrot seed mix and started feeding them in a little pot on the floor underneath my balcony. The birds that come by for the seeds are sulphur crested cockatoos, rainbow lorikeets, and I saw a crimson rosella parrot last week too! The cockatoos come in groups of 3-5 but the most I've seen at one time is 12.

Last weekend in the morning I saw some 3 cockatoos come by waiting for a feed. I refilled the pot and I was watching them from the balcony when the next door neighbour went onto her balcony (about 25 metres away- we live on a large piece of land) and shouted at us "HEY! YOU'RE NOT ALLOWED TO FEED THEM. STOP FEEDING THE BIRDS. THEY EAT EVERYTHING" while gesturing to her balcony and house?? And stormed back in.

Now the neighbours haven't been the friendliest since we moved. We try to gesture hello but they just ignore us…

Here's the kicker. I've seen them feed a group of kookaburras everyday at a certain time so I thought it was ok for me to feed the native birds too. I don't feed pigeons (not that there are any here), crows or magpies. Previously I feed the birds at my place about 2 handfuls of of seeds 3 times a week. Well I'm not going to feed them anymore now as its left a bad taste in my mouth.

I did read up on native bird feeding and it is discouraged so I shall stop anyways.

I just wanted your thoughts on the situation and also vent a little bit. I know I am in the wrong in feeding them now but I think they're being hypocritical but I'm not going to fight them on it as they do seem a bit unhinged in their other behaviours.

Comments

  • +1 vote
  • +1 vote

    I toss a bit of seed on the end of the driveway, at the end of the day. We see a bit of everything pass by, depending on the day. The best part is the maggies don't swoop us now- lol.

  • +4 votes

    Go shit on the neighbor's lawn! Just kidding. Some people are just angry at everything. Just stop feeding the birds if it's not recommended and ignore the neighbor. Some people are not worth wasting your time over.

  •  

    A kooka or Maggie family is cool. Cockies on the otherhand, although a fantastic bird, can become a nuisance very quickly.

    •  

      There's a nesting tree near my place. They make a fair bit of noise in the afternoon/morning, but it's not really bothersome. Sucks for the guy who has it on his property though, his car and whole front yard is always covered in crap.

  • +1 vote

    On the other hand, you can plant the wild bird seed mix and stuff will grow. Inc the sunflower seeds.

  • +3 votes

    The noise! Jesus. We have a cockatoo feeder at work and get 5 or 6 cockatoos come down from time to time as well as rosellas and rainbow lorikeets and the noise. I work in an industrial area and these birds are louder than anything else that goes on in the estate.

    I kinda get it. They are nice looking birds, but they are super messy (both eating and shitting), destroy everything and screech at 150dB. I think your neighbour is quite within their rights to be pissed off at you. These sorts of birds shouldn’t be taught to rely on humans in a built up urban environment.

    If you want to interact with birds, go to them in a more natural habitat and enjoy them how they are supposed to be enjoyed. Go to your local park and feed the magpies. They will remember you come next swooping season.

  • +1 vote

    My parents used to feed the cockies in front of their house, had up to 30 there at one stage. The neighbors complained to the council who came out and told my parents they needed to stop. I can understand not wanting to have a concentration of birds in your proximity (lots of noise and poop, and the feed can attract vermin).

    The cockies gave them some happiness but at the same time I can see it from their neighbors perspective and some right to peace and cleanliness in your own home.

  • +3 votes

    The idea of poop everywhere is enough for me. It's the worst finding spots of poop on the washing hung out to dry

    My dad took pity on a magpie with an injured Magpie by feeding him scraps and now the fella just hangs by our sliding door out back and apparently comes inside the house every now and again if we leave the door open.

    •  

      This 100%.

  • +7 votes

    I don't see a problem with doing it as long as the birds get the right food. Which is where the problem is.
    I'm the local person that people bring injured birds too. Here my guide on what to feed what type of birds.

    Honey Eaters/Lorikeets get decent Nectar replacement eg Sheps/Wombaroo or Honey Eater pellets.
    As seeds can kill Lorikeets they gut and mouth isn't designed for seeds. Their tongue has hair on it for licking flowers and if they fall off or break the Lorikeet can't eat. Any seeds need to be de husked and put in water to soften to the point they germinate.
    Some brands like Harmony (found at Coles and Woolworths) are mostly sugar and you can easily smell and taste it. If you wouldn't eat lollies all day then a bird shouldn't. Honey on bread is also a big no.

    Seed eaters: (Parakeets, Cockatiels, Well most parrots really.) Need to get pellets eg Vetafarm Bird Nutriblend Pellets.
    Most bird store bought bird seed is full of fat and oils. It's on the same level as a human eating nothing but cheese pizzas every day. Especially ones that are majority sunflower seeds.

    Insect catching birds: (Magpies, Butcherbirds and Kookaburras) should get Wombaroo insectivore mix mixed up with 4 star or higher mince. Sausage mince and or lower then 3 star is too fatty for their livers to process. There is nothing in standalone mince/steak/sausages etc that these types of birds find useful.

    Any questions feel free to ask. :)

    You would also see a drop in numbers as birds are going "what no junk food anymore? Only this healthy stuff what a rip off." So crabby neighbours will be happier lol. :)

    • +1 vote

      Agree with all this 100%

      •  

        Great advice, but think also about the local balance and avoid feeding the more common birds- especially carnivores.

        If you feed the common birds- kookas, butcher birds, magpies and cockies. Each pair will bring up more babies each year, where before they would do maybe one, and these babies mature to predate all the frogs, lizards and everything else around us.

        Carnivores like magpies, butcher birds and kookas have a great advantage over their prey in backyards as there is less cover for them to hide underneath.

  • +1 vote

    LOL it's possible she just wants them all to eat at her place

    where do you live? i don't think they can actually stop you.

    as for it being bad - despite all the comments here - no it is not necessarily bad. it depends what you do and how you do it.

    buy 2 copies of this
    https://booko.com.au/works/8095589

    ‘At last, a sensible, science-based guide to safely feeding wild birds in Australia.’

    if you dont feel comfortable knocking on the door and trying to be nice, just leave one in their letter box

  • +2 votes

    invade and take over neighbour's property and claim it as your own, making them your serfs on your newly owned estate

  • +13 votes

    You need to assert your dominance over your neighbour by attracting larger and more fearsome predatory birds than they can.
    Try hanging a kangaroo carcass over your balcony in order to win the affection of local eagles and falcons.

  •  

    Nothing wrong with feeding them unless you see signs everywhere (in my area there's signs to not feed the ducks bread but you can feed other recommended things). But there have been areas where homes are destroyed by certain birds (Cockatoos. See this:2019 A Current Affair:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FE4GxzZ4Sr4) but it's rare cases. But I'm going to agree with the many here and say your neighbour is a Karen just complaining about anything. Try talking to your other neighbours if you can to see what they think of the birds… and the neighbour.

  •  

    Please don't feed the birds, they can find their own food just fine.

  •  

    Don't feed native wildlife, not good for their diets

  • +2 votes

    Cockatoos are nasty birds and you don't want them coming to your house regularly. They're loud, shit everywhere, and will damage your property

  • +1 vote

    Tell them you can do whatever the hell you want on your own property… They haven't been particularly nice to you up till now so why try to start pleasing them now?

  •  
    'Supplementary food
    

    Birds fleeing fires are not only dealing with the stress and damage from the fire event itself but the destruction of their food sources, shelter and nest sites. If you are in towns and cities near where these fires have occurred, you can help by putting out some supplementary food for fleeing birds to help them in the immediate aftermath. There can be issues with feeding birds that you should be aware of so be sure to:

    Keep feeding stations impeccably clean. These birds will already have stressed immune systems and so will likely be particularly susceptible to disease. Clean the stations every day by removing excess food, washing the station and scrubbing it with a wire brush and either dilute bleach solution or specific wildlife disinfectant.
    Remove food after about an hour (less for nectar mixes as they spoil quickly)
    Provide a range of foods for different types of birds (and on different feeding stations). Most of the birds we tend to feed are the big and bossy ones, don’t forget about the little insectivores, honeyeaters and finches that may be struggling. Try: mealworms or other invertebrates, fruit, nectar mixes, seed and either meat supplemented with calcium powder (like Wombaroo insectivore mix) or chopped up dog food rolls
    Avoid bread (its just a filler that provides minimal nutrition), honey/water mixes, straight sunflower seeds (which are very fatty) and mince. Mince is nutritionally not complete and also sticks to beaks, sometimes causing bacterial infections.
    Ensure stations are out of reach of cats, dogs and other potential threats
    Place stations in a quiet space for shyer birds to use'
    

    Feeding shouldn’t be a long-term solution. As habitat recovers and new plants establish, birds will be able to find food naturally and you can taper off on your feeding efforts.

    Naw let em all die the australian way… protect your property….

    ohh and Water

    'Whether you are close to fires or not, we are not even halfway through a long, very hot summer. Providing water in your yard that birds (and other wildlife) can safely access is an easy but important way to help out.

    You don’t need to go out and buy a fancy bird bath (though by all means buy one if you like). Instead, look at what you have around your home (or check out the local op shop) that you can put to use. Pot saucers, tubs, buckets, hanging pots, upside down bin lids, ceramic dishes, kids clam shell pools – all make great options (avoid metal as it can heat up too much). Different depths and types of baths provide lots of options for different birds. Be sure to:

    Place them in the shade around the garden at various heights - on the ground, on a pedestal, hanging from a tree
    Keep them close to shrubs and trees so birds can have an escape route
    Put rocks, a brick or a branch in the water, especially if the bath is smooth and slippery so anything that falls in can climb out
    Change the water daily or whenever it gets hot
    Keep cats indoors and if you have a dog, place the baths in an area where it cannot access
    Check any pools (including the skimming box) throughout the day and provide a wildlife ramp or heavy rope as an escape route if something falls in'
    

    naw think of your neighbours and your property … might get a lot of pesty living things…. no such thing as global warming scomo loves it.

  • +4 votes

    Kookaburras eat meat and won't rip all your timber to shreds. Cocakatoos eat seed and love chewing on timber.

    Your neighbours are right.

    • -2 votes

      yanks are our only neighbours and they're always right…

      • +1 vote

        No neighbours left?

  • -1 vote

    Your neighbour is right. OK, so you got upset with them because they sounded all agro and such, but it was for a good reason. Kind of like an angry shouting parent with a kid. Thr kid gets all upset because they were shouted at but the parent is right, no matter how inappropriately the message was delivered. It's not illegal but it's highly inadvisable to feed the birds at home. They'll trash your place. Kind of like teenagers really.

    One minute you're feeding them and they're all nice and friendly… nek minnit they're trashing the place.

    •  

      does not mean the neighbour is right.

      • +1 vote

        Feeding native birds is not good when it starts to attract flocks of cockatoos as the many posts in this thread will attest to. Not sure what the point of your post is other than simply to contradict what I've said without any backing info.

        Having dealt with flocks of cockatoos destroying bits of a house I lived in once, because someone living nearby kept feeding them, and the endless sh1t all over clothes hanging on the clothesline, I can sympathise with the neighbour even though their delivery of the message is not ideal. You could argue "So use your dryer then". Yeah but that's not good for the environment either.

        Yet I still can't figure out what your point is.

    • +2 votes

      Except that the neighbour is feeding the kookaburras. Agreed they don't do the damage of cockatoos, but if the principle is about not feeding, it has to be consistent.

      There have been some good suggestions about growing plants and providing water, so probably best to focus on that. The other advantage of flowers is that you provide food for butterflies and bees.

      •  

        The neighbours probably meant don't feed destructive numerous birds like cockatoos. Kookaburras aren't destructive and have much smaller groups (usually a maximum of like 5 birds).

        •  

          If you feed enough to upset the balance, it can be bad. Kookas predate all the other native wildlife, so when you feed them and their numbers increase above what the local environment can support, everything else gets impacted. They and their young simply get preyed on all day, and eaten by the extra kookas.

  •  

    A bird probably defecated on the neighbours house once and they lost their mind.

  • +7 votes

    My neighbours used to have a bird feeder too, here are some of the things I encountered:
    - Not being able to leave anything outside because random of birds (the feeder seemed to mostly attract pigeons) shitting all over everything
    - Cockatoos constantly chewing up the fence palings and whatever else they felt like
    - Having to clean my fence, backyard etc weekly to get all the bird shit off after I realised it was staining
    - Dropped bird seed started growing all through my lawn and gardens which I'd have to weed out every week (it's been 6 months since the feeder was taken down and every time it rains I still get weeds growing in the area the birds used to sit)
    - Mice started coming to eat the bird seed that was dropped, so ended up with mice burrows in my garden
    - Birds shitting all over my solar panels
    - Birds trying to nest under my solar panels
    - My very young child was scared to go out in the yard because flocks of birds would be lined up on the fence squawking at him
    - The noise!

    A love of nature is a great thing to have but please be mindful of your neighbours. It's not like they can just move to the next house down to get away from you, they're stuck there dealing with whatever you are imposing on them.
    Also from everything I googled at the time the consensus seemed to be that feeding birds was not recommended for their own health.

  •  

    Kookaburras are native birds too.

  •  

    Far worse are the people of a particular ethnic background in Eastwood (NSW) who feed the pigeons (which are a real nuisance there), despite their seemingly being at least 1 sign per 10sqm telling them not to (in both Chinese and Korean). Feeding native birds seed? Not really a big problem.

    •  

      Lots of countries eat pigeons, including the UK, so maybe they're using them for livestock.

      •  

        There's plenty of restaurants in the area serving squab, to be sure, so I wouldn't put it past them :D

        Having said that, the fact that pigeon numbers are not decreasing suggests they are more than likely being sourced from elsewhere.

  • +1 vote

    ask the local real estate agent to pressurize them away

  •  

    Don't feed the Cockatoos. Their powerful claws and beaks will destroy everything they land on. Each summer I see flocks of them literally destroying mature trees leaving small branches on the ground all around the trees. Not to mention the amount of poos they leave behind every time.

  •  

    Perhaps I need to drop this bombshell on you all?

    Birds aren’t real.

    https://people.ucsc.edu/~jaastant/

  • +1 vote

    We human often do things they believe good for animals.

  • +2 votes

    It is a shame that your neighbour treated you that way given your good intentions. They could have delivered the message much better.

    As many others have pointed out, feeding them directly isn't the best for the birds so is not recommended, although generally legal.

    We have had success attracting birds by setting up a bird bath and planting native plants that attract birds. Your nursery can point out the most appropriate plants for your area. Good luck!

  •  

    My wife loves cockatoos (where she is from overseas they are an exotic pet), would not listen to me to start with and fed them. Thankfully after them crapping all over her washing and breaking all the pegs she stopped, took several weeks for them to stop coming round. She still occasionally feeds the local lorikeets but not on a regular basis.

  • +2 votes

    laugh in their face and say that now your going to feed them a lot more

    •  

      while it isn't illegal in most places, some councils do have fines for feeding them and it is never a good idea to encourage cockatoos to visit your house, they are destructive noisy [email protected]

  •  

    I did some work at a place where a woman would feed the magpies daily. After one day the magpies had ripped the windscreen wiper blades of my car, and scratched up both side mirrors.

    A neighbour walked past and told me that the locals there had been complaining to and writing her letters for years and she would just ignore them.

    •  

      cause she does not have to listen to that complaint.

  • +2 votes

    tell her to get (profanity), not her property. you can do what ever you like. It is not agaist the law, you can do what ever you like on your propery within the law.

  • +5 votes

    A lot of people here say not to feed, but I saw on the ABC Gardening Australia program a segment by an Urban Ecologist that said feeding birds in moderation is fine.

    Attract birds to your garden by feeding responsibly (youtube)

    Not sure if I should trust random internet people or the ABC. Hmm…

    Yes, it's OK to feed wild birds.

  • +2 votes

    Question i have is with all the urbanisation and deforestation as well as extinction of so many species. Is there still as much food for a lot of these birds? I always thought in part that people fed them because there may not be as much food in these concrete jungles we have. The more we remove lawns and turf and put down concrete and remove trees from front and backyards, i would assume less food for them? I know i had a neighbour move in behind me and within 2 weeks had cut down all the trees and bushes in their backyard and removed most of their lawn. Then they started making up reasons and excuses to get me to cut down my trees as well, initially i was going to make them happy then people told me if i really dont want to do it, then dont do it.

    Fact is trees next to homes, actually make the homes a lot cooler in the hot summers we have, I remember in my parents home we had a few trees, one was causing some issues for a neighbour through its overhanging branches etc. It actually had a decent amount of wildlife on it, and in hindsight i really missed them as the birds used to come on my window sill and just sing away. Anyway once we removed that tree, i noticed my bedroom (which was the closest room / bedroom to that tree) would get a lot warmer and it took me years to actually realise that it was because of the tree. My friend's place is pretty much a jungle, trees all over the front and back yard, His house is so cool all the time.

    • +2 votes

      Good point. Having appropriate trees placed correctly makes environmental and economic sense.

      • +1 vote

        But it doesn't make money. Requires costly space.

        On a stinking hot day in Vaucluse you can comfortably have lunch in the street because under the heavy tree cover it is very nice.

        Try the same thing anywhere else in Sydney and you have to seek cover and AC. If you remove the awnings, cut down the trees, or never grow them in the first place… you bake for months on end in the summer.

    •  

      We have the biggest tree in the entire complex in our backyard, i love having the shade as it's right in front of our bedroom window but this tree is trying to multiply everywhere in our garden and the neighbor's garden too. We have to pull out at least one mini tree every time we mow the lawn, it's both interesting and frightening.

  • +4 votes

    Find something of your neighbors with their scent on it. Infuse what you feed with this scent. Train your new friends to eat your neighbors. Repeat until suitable neighbors.

    •  

      creative thought so gets my vote - do you have a big dog yet?

      •  

        Picking him up next week. The apex predator of the dog world, or so I'm told. Can anyone advise on how many metres tall a Chihuahua grows? I'm told it's Portugese for Dire Wolf.

        • -1 vote

          vicious breed - once i remember feeling a weight on my leg when walking - it was a Chihuahua with its teeth locked in my trousers - went to the kerb and shook my leg…

          •  

            @petry: Good lord, how did you outrun it?

            Also - I joke but there was a story about a man who had his toe bitten off by a chihuahua a few years back. Can't find a link without some pretty horrendous imagery, otherwise I'd link it.

  •  

    Most councils have laws which prohibit feeding native birds for a number of reasons including but not limited to:

    1. Creates dependancy on the feeder
    2. The feed may not be healthy for the birds and may not form part of their natural diet.
    3. Some birds will act up if they aren't fed at certain times/days and may start eating timber parts of the house (possibly why your neighbour was motioning to the balcony?)

    We live in a rural residential area and it's best to enjoy birds as they fly through nature and not to create these dependencies.

    • +1 vote

      yes i think its government policy to end native dependencies on the land

    • +1 vote

      not to create these dependencies

      Nonsense for birds.

      Dogs and cats, dogs in particular will seek human dependency but certainly birds don't.

      That is why some "bird lovers" keep them in cages.

  • +1 vote

    Most people have something stuck up their …. ahem, yeah you know

  • +1 vote

    Some people don't like birds.
    Others don't like cats or dogs or whatever.

    Ignore them.

    Do what you enjoy doing.
    If the haters complain just say OK and ignore them.

  • +1 vote

    I'm not totally against it. A certain little old lady I know feeds kookaburras…I've mentioned that she should at least add a wild bird supplement to the meat, but she gets such joy out of it that I'm certainly not going to tell her to stop.

    Whatever if is, you should look up the appropriate diet for that bird type and try to feed that to them. For the carnivores there is a mix you can get from a couple of suppliers to add to meat. For fruit/nectar birds there are powdered mixes. For the seed lovers, you can get the wild bird mixes. Don't leave the food out 24/7 - try to have a particular feeding time

    As others have mentioned, having a water feeder or four is a nice way to go…especially if you keep them full during droughts. That and try to grow native plants that the birds will like. Our backyard was barren when we moved to our current house, but now it has many bushes and trees, and the birdlife has followed.

    Not a big fan on sulphur crested cockatoos myself, as they are noisy buggers, but to each their own.

    I generally don't feed wild birds, but make an exception every now and then for local magpies. The birds around my neighbourhood don't try to peck our ears off in Spring like others, and I tend to think that it's due to some of the neighbours tossing them a tidbit now and then. Only anecdotal I know. I have supplement to add to the food if I do this.

  •  

    My biggest concerns in feeding native birds is the change in diet as well as change in behavior, if they have a sustainable source of food and water particular birds might not migrate properly as seasons change. Doing it now and then is perfectly fine and for cockatoos in particular seeds are good but you should check the preferred diet of each bird and feed accordingly, another thing to be careful of is having the birds get used to being on the ground as this can open them up to introduced predators like cats or foxes so it is best to put the food in an elevated place.

    Why would they bother feeding Koalas if Koalas are there they are probably surrounded by Eucalyptus seems pointless, plus you should not hand feed Koalas as the can be aggressive and can very easily hurt you. Leaving a container of water out is really good though as in recent times due to the hotter and drier climate the
    eucalyptus leaves have been much drier and Koalas have been in need of more water.

  • +1 vote

    If they are Cockatoos please do not feed them. My once quiet suburb has been ruined by them. We have 100s flying over our house every day from sunrise to sundown. I didnt think there could be a worse noise then construction, Harleys or the neighbours dog. But the Cockys take the cake.

  •  

    Tell your neighbors to go (profanity) themselves

  •  

    If you like your house/dway/fence/roof/whatever covered in bird crap in a short period of time, then yeah go ahead and feed them. I not only don't feed wildlife, I have also setup spikes many places around my place as I got tired of hosing/scraping crap of my porch and car.

  • +6 votes

    The main issue here is that your neighbour was really ****ing rude and could have just mentioned it nicely instead of behaving like a four year old. Totally disproportionate response to someone putting out a bit of birdseed.

    And everyone saying their suburb has been ruined by native birds…have a think about what you're saying. Birds were here first.

  •  

    I wouldn’t want you as my neighbour personally. Birds make a mess and are very noisy. Some birds are also very aggressive to pets and people.

  •  

    Feed Sulphur Crested Cockatoo, you are likely to regret it. Other birds need a mixed diet. They'll take the lazy option if you provide the Maccas of the bird world. Irregular supplementation should not hurt but how do you ensure they only get supplementation when it is highly likely other neighbours in the bird's territory are leaving out plates of seed? The answer is, you can't. Give them a reliable water source instead. However, your need to be aware snakes like a reliable water supply. When you build your bird bath or drinking station, remember that its a good idea not to have any water near the house that may attract snakes.

    Another way to attract birds is to plant bird attracting plants.
    https://www.gardeningwithangus.com.au/anguss-top-ten-austral...
    https://www.gardeningwithangus.com.au/attracting-wildlife-to...
    https://www.gardeningwithangus.com.au/anguss-top-ten-austral...
    There'll be more advice on the internet.
    Try local council web pages. Some give advice on native flora that attracts wildlife.

  •  

    Feed the birds twice as often. Ignore the birds that arrive and stare at your neighbour's house the entire time.

  •  

    how would you feel if dogs and shit on your lawn, footpath and driveway and just leave like nothing has happen? You step in the crap and drag it in the carpet at home.
    who would cleans the bird shit from your neighbours footpath, windows etc

    • +1 vote

      I'm always mind blown that people don't take their shoes off inside, esp on carpet.

      (But do agree with not wanting shit on windows.)

      •  

        And lie on their bed/sofa with shoes on…. Ughhh

        •  

          people do all sorts of disgusting sh%t like licking their fingers after touching all sorts of other disgusting sh&t.

  •  

    Old Asians love feeding pigeons. Why?
    More than one of my neighbours over the years.

    When I worked at Hurstville the pigeons would all gather around the train station mini 'park' and the old Asian grandparents minding their grand kids would feed them, but also let the kids do it and run amongst all the birds flapping around.

    Could just imagine all the ticks/fleas and what not in the air getting on them.

    •  

      Old Asians love feeding pigeons. Why?

      It’s a cultural thing. Many SEA households in villages keep domesticated animals as food. Feeding them is a daily chore. It’s not uncommon to find migrants continuing this habit when they move overseas.
      https://thewoksoflife.com/chinese-fried-pigeon-squab/

  •  

    You can feed the Cookies of you like, they aren't even protected. Just show us pics of the damage later 😁. The previous owners used to feed them here and the hand rails have been torn apart. I encourage the Rosellas and King Parrots and try and discourage the cockies and rainbows.

  • +2 votes

    There are a lot of comments here. I've skimmed through them and haven't seen anything like what I'm about to write - but apologies if it's been said before.

    If you like native birds, consider planting trees/plants that they like.

    It's a lot more effort - especially the upkeep, but you can still see them, and you'll feel better knowing that you are still encouraging their foraging behaviours, etc. You can also attract some more rarer species, that you would struggle to bring in with parrot feed.

  •  

    Cockatoos are destructive, if they hang around they start ripping stuff up with their strong beaks.

    Kookaburras eat meat and insects and don't destroy things.

    Your neighbour is an idiot. Buy some lilly pillys and block them out.

    If you like birds put a bird bath in instead, the parrots will use it.

  • +1 vote

    You can just leave them alone. Pretty sure they can feed themselves fine.

  •  

    You’re not meant to give birds your typical birdseed. It’s your property though. Maybe buy some plants that are good for birds.

  •  

    https://www.heraldsun.com.au/leader/east/cockatoos-cause-tho...

    Wow, I learn something new everyday. Thank you Ozbargain

  •  

    Personally I don’t think feeding any wild animals is a good idea - it’s unnatural for the animals, often unhealthy, and encourages them to become reliant on humans. It seems to be done usually more for humans benefit than the animals.

  •  

    I've just looked and the experts all say don't feed them. Plant native trees and shrubs and leave water out but clean the water container daily.

  •  

    If you like birds, set up bird baths instead especially if you live somewhere that gets hot often

  • +1 vote

    Dont feed them, i had neighbours living one floor up from us and his mother used to feed these bastard cuckatoos. Intially we also enjoyed watching like 10’s of birds sitting at our balcony plus there but not for long as these birds were causing mayhem at our building. Their crap was huge and tend to etch into the floor and can damage if not cleaned on time plus they drop all those birds feeds and bread crumbs on our balcony which we had to deal with someone’ else’s pleasure and shit. And also they are so loud that they could wake the shit up early morning when they come in flocks. We talked to our neighbours and he said his mother likes feeding the birds but she has stopped but she didn’t. But luckily they moved out now.

  • +3 votes

    Our house is on top a hill, someone on our street used to feed pigeons either early mornings or late afternoons.
    I spoke to them about not feeding the pigeons but they don't listen. We're talking about 50-70 pigeons per day sitting on our roof waiting to be feed for over 6 months.

    The pigeons would shit everywhere, clothing and our car.

    I tried using high pressure water and shoot at the pigeons. The last resort was to DIY and lay electric wire fence on the roof.

    Lets just say that the pigeons are now on his property and not on my roof and that they have stopped feeding the pigeons. They now realise that there is shit everywhere on his property, cloths line and car.

  •  

    My neighbour feeds the cockatoos every morning and every afternoon.
    We live in a suburban area and like clockwork they come screeching in at unbearable volumes at 6am and then 4pm.

    They have chewed open my solar pool strip heating, which in turn has put salted pool water through my gutters and rusted them. The solution was cockatoo proof solar heating panels that cost me 2 grand. The gutters will need replacing one day.

    They also chew my clothesline if it's left open, so i have to close it up every time i don't use it. They also have chewed my children's trampoline to bits.
    The seed the neighbour throws around has attracted rats which then moved into my split system air con (The outside unit) which ended up blowing the main board due to rat urine. This has happened twice now at $400 a pop.

    I'm not going to tell you not to do it, but yes they are very destructive.

  •  

    I've got a couple of ignorant neighbours. Seen the guy shouting/cursing at people who may have parked infront of their house on the street for no reason. Completely ignore me everytime I have said hi so I have stopped greeting them. Other neighbours are good and welcoming.

  •  

    i have not read any of the other comments, yet. but, i cannot see the benefit of feeding wild birds, to anyone or any bird. why do it? WHY? they'll just become reliant on it. they just start expecting it. feeding cockatoos? what? i'd lose my sh#t if my neighbor fed those noisy f#ckers, inviting them to come back and wake me up at dawn. when at parks, such as the local national park right near my house, i can't believe it when people feed birds - those birds then start harrassing us, and, if you look the wrong direction for a second, they pounce on your stuff, and start pulling stuff out of your backpack that has a slightly open zipper. not the bird's fault, the bird has been conditioned by idiots to get their sustenance from humans. ffs, don't do it.

    nowhere in the OPs post do they mention WHY they do it. WHY? WHY? WHY?

    that neighbor sounds like a hypocrite. while i think kookaburras are kinda cool, they are the worst when it comes to pouncing on your food. they are pretty good at it.

    i have not yet shared this with anyone feeding birds, as i have only seen it at parks, not too close to my house. but would if my neighbor was idiotic enough to do it. especially if they were feeding cockatoos.

    •  

      I feed the magpie family in my backyard. Not every day, just on the days they come out back and warble at my back door. And not much food. They used to swoop us, now they just hang out with us. And they're very polite!

  •  

    We feed a few kookaburras who drop by briefly in the late afternoon for a snack. It's very rewarding and not harming them at all.

  •  

    yet another reason to consider feeding wild birds
    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-55910424#:~:t....

    just try your best to do it the right ways:
    https://www.ozbargain.com.au/comment/10029603/redir

  • +1 vote

    Very appropriate and very oportune for this current forum.
    An article in SMH about birds:

    The surprising mental health benefits of bird watching at home

    Experts say installing a bird bath or feeder in your outdoor area for our feathered friends can help make our cities happier, healthier places.

    •  

      not government policy - no interest in health or happiness. War it is - meat for the grinder

  •  

    Don't feed wild birds. They will spread diseases among them. You can get them all killed!!