Ordered Coffee from a Coffee Roaster Online - Received Coffee and a Religious Booklet Asking if I Should I Burn in Hell?

Recently i ordered coffee from a roaster. This is probably my 5th-6th or so order, so i'm a somewhat regular customer.
But this package was different. This order included a free tea sample, but attached to it with an elastic band was a religious flyer.
The flyer (or booklet) pictured a black and white draw close up of a man on a cross, with red blood dripping down. Several pages about the big book, various quotes and a check box at the end asking if i wanted to be saved or to burn in hell.

I'll be honest and say i'm a little taken back. I've bought coffee from you - this isnt an opportunity for you to push your views onto me. Regardless of how i feel about the content.
Not cool.

Could it be a 'rogue' employee or maybe its a smallish company who have those views? I wont name them - or at least, not yet.
So now i'm in 2 minds whether to contact them about it or let it go. I mean whats the best/worst that can happen if i was to even bother?

That all said i cant say i'm losing sleep over it and yes I have moved on.
But i was curious - has anyone else had a similar experience with ordering stuff online?

Comments

  • +49 votes

    Yes, I get those "discounted" wine vouchers all the time in packages. Most likely the company were paid to add these to packages. Modern day junk mail leaflets.

    Give them some feedback that you weren't happy with it & will affect future purchases.

    • +8 votes

      It looked like a one-man operation. Drawn and printed out on a home printer jobby. Not a glossy mass-produced marketing campaign

      • -1 vote

        Upload a photo so we can have a squiz.

        • +13 votes

          So in the newer comments lower down you slag off the post - only i find you here asking for a pic so you can see for yourself? Yeah - good one. lol

          • -15 votes

            @6000SUX: Yeah. Are you gonna post it? Or just tap dance around it.

            • +17 votes

              @Skinnerr: So let me get this timeline right (or at least at the time of writing this comment). I'll paraphrase

              18 hours 43 min ago - 'upload a photo so i can see'
              18 hours 12 min ago - 'your post is an incoherent word vomit whinge - Why is it worthy of such a debate?' (yes thats further down folks)
              7 hours 31 min ago - 'look i really want to see a photo'

              Well a photo has already been posted. Maybe tap dance your way to find it? After all I wouldnt want to deprive you of enjoying and contributing to this post further!

              Maybe consider changing your username to 'polarr'?

              • +7 votes

                @6000SUX: It's great to see an OP hold their own and win an argument for a change.

  • +67 votes

    If you get fast service and good coffee at a good price just bin the spam this time, but if it happens again, a message to the roaster asking them not to send you unsolicited material may do the trick.

    Your other option is to burn in hell j/k

    • +7 votes

      Its just a matter of time….

    • +23 votes

      Haha I was thinking he should write back:

      "Hi xxxxcompanynamexxxx, Thank you for your concern. I would rather choose to burn in hell. It will provide me warmth during these cold days."

      Then write a follow up email in a day or two "Hi xxxxcompanynamexxxx, your wish just came true. I am now in hell, a little hotter than expected, but I am happy here. Satan is actually very nice and makes sure I am well looked after. The fire reminds me of campfire on Earth when there were no lockdowns. I missed those. Thankfully no lock-downs here. I can roam around where I feel like. Unfortunately now that I am in hell, I don't think I can order any more coffee from you guys, unless you deliver here?. If you do, please let me know what address should I use? I can't find any addresses around this place. It just says 'Hell'. No street names, no house numbers, no city or state or country.. I guess this is the end of it. It was good ordering from you guys while I was living on Earth as a human. Goodbye and Good luck with your business. I will miss your coffee very much.

      Sincerely Yours,
      F***off"

      •  

        Satan is nicer than you might think

        • +1 vote

          You need Satan more than he needs you.

        •  

          To whoever downvoted this, take a chill pill

    • +1 vote

      a message to the roaster asking them not to send you unsolicited material may do the trick.

      That trojan horse coffee roaster needs a hella of a roasting.

    •  

      "… and the next time they ordered coffee it had a deep-bodied flavour with a hint of almond. Little did they know that the almond flavour was coming from the cyanide that laced the beans was a first-class ticket to whatever afterlife…"

      Haha. But hey it may be just my distrust of people going to lengths to fear-monger others to submit to something.

  • +13 votes

    Check their social media… I doubt you were the only one who got an 'extra' and you can see how the company has responded to comments about it?

    • +1 vote

      good call. Hmmmm nothing yet - but i'll keep digging

  • +59 votes

    Was it this coffee roaster in Brisbane?

    • +7 votes

      Certainly sounds like it. Way to kill a business :o

      • +16 votes

        Spot on - ok not just me then. Interesting

        •  

          *Ordered from a Coffee Roaster Online - Received Coffee and Religious Booklet Asking if I Should Burn in Hell?

        •  

          Well, now you should post a copy of the pamphlet

    • +7 votes

      Oh great, will never order from them…

    • +2 votes

      The Store Rep ignored that comment and responded to other comments.

      "Voldemort made his own name Taboo. Thus, whenever his name was spoken aloud, Death Eaters and Snatchers were alerted to the location of the speaker."

      • +3 votes

        They did reply. It is just below the original comment. also collapsed

        "Thanks for your feedback, It was just a one-off event that we wanted to share with our customers about what is about to take place in this world along with some free coffee cherry for you guys to try.

        The truth to us is more important than money or our business so we decided to share as a one off. The good thing at the moment is there is still a little bit of freedom to think or believe what we want however not for long looking at the way things are heading. You are welcome to do with it as you want ie read it or throw it in the bin and we hope you enjoy the coffee cherry tea!

        Just to clarify again, people won't be receiving info with future orders. 😀 Hope you have a fantastic week!"

        •  

          what is about to take place in this world

          The online way of "holding a cardboard" on the street, eh!

        • +3 votes

          how kind. can they provide a weather forecasting service with the next order it'll be a lot better use for the chopped down trees

        • +3 votes

          Thanks, I read it again, as you pointed it out that, the Store Rep actually replied to their own post than to the commenter (how interesting! /s…).

          it was just some free coffee cherry tea with a piece of paper attached with a few bible verses on it. It was meant as an act of kindness.

          Woah, "an act of kindness."… what a genuine way to divert attention away!

        • +5 votes

          They need to learn what "one-off" means.

    • +20 votes

      Epic comment there by Whiskeyjack: "combined with the "plandemic" comment above I won't be buying from you again. I don't want to be Jonestown'd by conspiracy theorists."

      Looks like they're not just kind old nans from church, they believe in deranged endtimes/antivax stuff.

      • +4 votes

        I've always liked reading comments from religious people, they make me laugh so much.

        Plandemic, so a planned pandemic.

        God is an all powerful, omniscient being. So God could have stopped a pandemic, but didn't, which means he wanted it. So plandemic, means a pandemic planned by God.

    • +4 votes

      Holy moly what a bunch of nutters

    • +36 votes

      If it was Mannabeans, they appear to be cotton wooling sending hateful religious propaganda as 'just an act of kindness'. Umm, no. If you tell someone they will burn in hell if you don't believe in the same thing that I do, that's not love. That's hate.

      • +2 votes

        How is that hate and not love? They think something is true and wants to help you avoid it.

        • +2 votes

          There are dozens of religions, sects and cults that could produce their case to you that you must believe in what they believe, or you'll burn in hell. Would it annoy you if those people presented their cases to you, in unwelcome ways, when you least expect it? Would you consider it 'love' when a JW (for example) says you must join them or suffer eternal punishment?

          I know the case can be made that you're trying to save people from something terrible, therefore the message of eternal damnation is actually a message of care and love. But try to look at it from the other point of view.

          •  

            @Cluster:

            Would it annoy you if those people presented their cases to you, in unwelcome ways, when you least expect it?

            In the form of a pamphlet? I wouldn't care. I can see how others might find it annoying or surprising, but not that they hate me.

            Would you consider it 'love' when a JW (for example) says you must join them or suffer eternal punishment?

            Yes. How is it an act of hate?

            If I'm about it to walk on a bridge and someone tells me it could collapse. I wouldn't think they hate me. If anything, I'd think they're concerned about me.

            •  

              @ozhunter: How about

              You must join my cult to be saved, or your mother will die from cancer, father will be hit by a bus, siblings will go missing. There's only one way to save them and it's up to you.

              •  

                @Ughhh: Two differences from your example and pamphlet is that the consequences refer to only the person and what happens when they're already dead.

                Would be more fair to say if I didn't join your cult then when I die, I'd forever float around in space or something.

                But even with your example, still don't see warning someone as an act of hate. The latter part might be considered a threat though 🤣

      • -3 votes

        if you thought someone was about to drive off a cliff, and you warned them, you think that would be hate? we clearly have very different ideas of love and hate,

        • +1 vote

          A key difference here is I can show you the danger: the cliff, the drop below, and note the occupants of the vehicle are rapidly heading towards it. All can be empirically shown to exist. The danger is clear and obvious.

          • -1 vote

            @Cluster: Which is why I said 'thought', and not 'was'.
            The point is that some people believe they have an obligation to warn their neighbours of impending peril.
            You may disagree about the extent or even the existence of the peril, but providing the warning is an act of love, not hate.

            • +2 votes

              @Almost Banned: Is it really a "warning" though? Or just manipulation?

              Harvey Norman: "those $10 HDMI cables are bad, don't buy those, could damage your tv. The $100 ones are much better, just a friendly warning".

              •  

                @Ughhh: This perfectly illustrates the problem.
                A huge number of people here are not religious, and have no idea what it means to be religious - so they assume that it is like other interactions they are more familiar with and assume the worst motivations.
                A religious person warning others about hell is not even remotely like the sale of HDMI cables.

                • +2 votes

                  @Almost Banned: I think it's something you and those preachers are failing to understand. Christianity is not a new thing, Manna beans is not the first person to preach these stuff. People don't care about what you believe in, just like you don't care about the sales person's beliefs in a $100 cable. Stopping manipulating and basically cursing people that they're going to hell for not following you. People don't care about your made up warnings.

                  Imagine if Scomo did this.

                  •  

                    @Ughhh: Let me put it Occam's style:
                    A pamphlet about hell if hell is not real does you exactly zero harm.
                    A pamphlet that saves you from hell if hell is real does you a huge amount of good.
                    Or utilitarian style:
                    If you are not interested, throw it in the bin. It cost you nothing and harms no-one.
                    If you are interested, do what you will. Again, it costs the uninterested nothing and may benefit many.

                    • +1 vote

                      @Almost Banned:

                      if hell is not real

                      if?

                    •  

                      @Almost Banned: Join my cult and be saved, or your loved one may be hit by a bus. Just a warning, trying to save you.

                      Will hell have fewer annoying people telling me what to do and threatening me?

                      •  

                        @Ughhh: I may suspect your motives, but I certainly wouldn't call it hate.
                        I think your hell may involve nothing but people telling you what to do, and no bargains.

    • +8 votes

      I'm looking forward to the inevitable brigading of the next Mannabeans post

    • +2 votes

      The roaster got roasted 😉

  •  

    If your coffee roaster is shizophrenic and believes in sky fairies and that good-natured people burn for eternity for not also believing in sky fairies, how do you know they haven't tampered (pun intended) with your coffee?

    •  

      Yeah, I'd be a little worried about it being some kind of mass suicide cultist… That it hasn't made the news yet probably means it's all fine though.

      • +2 votes

        Nah someone found the post - it looks like the owner deliberately sends those little leaflets to everyone who orders from them to try and convert people. It was never going to end well as more than half of the population ain't religious or spiritual.

    • +24 votes

      I am not defending sending unsolicited religious tracts with sales, but I am stunned that people seem to think it is ok to respond to other people's beliefs like this.
      Regardless of your own religious or non-religious ideas, condemning everyone who believes in God to mental illness is not only grossly offensive to people of faith, but also to people with actual mental illness.
      And then to suggest that because they believe in God they might tamper with the product they are selling???
      How did that get to be ok?
      Can't we just accept that some people believe stuff that we may not?

      • +41 votes

        Regardless of your own religious or non-religious ideas, condemning everyone who believes in God to mental illness is not only grossly offensive to people of faith, but also to people with actual mental illness.

        Some might argue that seeing apparitions, and believing in imaginary things, is a sign of mental illness… If I said I had those symptoms, without any religious context, you'd suggest I see a psych I'm sure

        •  

          All of us believe in imaginary things.

        • +4 votes

          You assume that religious people see apparitions, and that they believe in imaginary things.
          And this whole thread has a religious context, so your comment is inapt.

          • +9 votes

            @Almost Banned:

            that they believe in imaginary things.

            Last I checked… Yes

            Even if one religion was correct, by some random chance, that would mean the rest believe in make-believe…

            • +10 votes

              @spackbace: Believing in God is not exclusive to one religion, nor is the idea of heaven, or hell.
              In fact a great many things religious people believe are not exclusive to any one religion.
              So,given that no-one can entirely prove or disprove the concept, it is entirely possible that all religious people believe in several things are are correct,and possibly a number of things that are incorrect.
              That would make them no different from most people, and no more properly to be ridiculed because your incorrect beliefs and theirs do not happen to coincide.

              • +2 votes

                @Almost Banned:

                because your incorrect beliefs

                According to who? You? Mine would only be incorrect if you could prove without a doubt that I was wrong

                At least, that's how I was always taught the meaning of "incorrect" meant…

                You seem very argumentative… Like you're offended by my comments and just can't let it go. No wonder the majority of wars have been due to religion.

                • +4 votes

                  @spackbace: Thank you for proving my point.
                  I was suggesting that everyone believes in things that are not correct, and that ridiculing someone for believing different incorrect things to you makes no sense and is intolerant.
                  For some people that may - or may not - be religious.
                  For others it may be something like the Great Wall of China can be seen from the moon, that cracking your knuckles gives you arthritis, or that the majority of wars have been due to religion.
                  The last of these claims - which you make - is clearly false and, unlike religion, is readily proveable. In fact only a small percentage, less than 10%, have predominantly been due to religion.
                  So, you and I believe different false things. Should I mock and scorn you for your incorrect anti-religious belief?

                  • +2 votes

                    @Almost Banned: does spackbace send you pamphlets that claim the great wall of china can be seen from the moon and that we should ignore speed limits because of it?

                  • +5 votes

                    @Almost Banned: "everyone believes in things that are not correct"

                    I try very hard not to. Shouldn't we all? Sounds like you've realised your own beliefs are unjustified but are trying to defend them by saying most other people are equally crazy. What a world!

                    I agree that not all nonreligious people are spotless, craziness or just lazy/biased thinking isn't only a property of the church.

                    "and that ridiculing someone for believing different incorrect things to you makes no sense and is intolerant."

                    Nah I think we should be trying to do better and understand reality accurately. Reality shouldn't be based on opinion. Correcting people, teaching critical thought, and perhaps an appropriate amount of ridicule is healthy.

                    • +1 vote

                      @thtol: To be clear,I do not think that anyone's beliefs should be free from question, and in appropriate ways and cases, criticism - however, the example I gave immediately above to Spackbace was a readily proveable fact. It was simply false, notwithstanding Spackbace believed it to be true. I expect he will revise his position based on that new information. That is what should happen.
                      The same reasoning does not apply to religious belief. It is not readily proveable or disproveable. It is much more akin to an opinion. I could say that chocolate ice cream is better than strawberry ice cream. You may disagree - but neither of us is definitively right or wrong. The same applies to a belief in God. You may say He exists, I may disagree. Neither of us can prove our position.
                      We could mock each other for it - but what would that achieve. Mutual respect for our differing positions seems like the more civilised option - but it seems to be increasingly rare.

                      • +5 votes

                        @Almost Banned: No I don't think you can describe religion as 'just an opinion'. Religions make claims about the nature of reality, they keep treading into the territory of science and factual history.

                        A belief in a general god is hard to disprove because it's so poorly defined. Some gods like that of Deism/Spinoza/Pantheism never do anything to interact with the universe and are virtually equivalent to an atheist universe that is itself labelled 'god' for romantic purposes. But that doesn't make it 'an opinion' either, there is a real answer we should be trying to determine, and the correct response is to admit how much we really know rather than just randomly choosing a side and singing songs about how glorious it is to be on that side.

                        Start getting into the details of religion and there is plenty of things to directly fight about. Either the earth is 5000 years old or it isn't. Either we share a common ancestor with other species or we don't, and there is a good answer to that that religious people are often wrong about. Either there's a heaven/hell or there isn't. Either god intervenes in the world directly to help Sports Team win the finals, or he doesn't. Did jesus turn water into wine in a historical event? Did Mohammad fly to the moon on a horse and split it in half? Not all answers to that question are equally valid, I am prepared to argue that there is a single answer and it is not down to opinion.

                        •  

                          @thtol: To correct you, I did not describe religion as 'just an opinion', I said it was not susceptible to proof or disproof, like an opinion.
                          There may be some religious beliefs that are able to be disproven, at least based on current knowledge, but I am not sure your examples are good ones for that claim.
                          You can, however, assert your own view and even believe it is the only 'reasonable' conclusion to come to, but proving it?
                          I do agree, however, that there is such a thing as objective truth - if only we could find it.

                          • +5 votes

                            @Almost Banned: It is hard work to track down objective truth, but there is good confidence in some facts and ideas. It seems like you want us to take it for granted that all answers to any question are equally valid and therefore you should be allowed to believe wholeheartedly in one of them of your choice without internal shame or social ridicule.

                            You say my examples are bad, conveniently without explanation, but I'll defend them and say they're relevant for illustrating that many religious beliefs are in conflict with reality. Some christians have the religious belief that the world is only 5000-8000 years old. They're clearly wrong! You can't tut-tut me about being too arrogant about "my view" and the difficulty of "proving" "truth" on that one: they're simply being crazy. Agreed?

                            Other religious beliefs might be more subjective than that one and can be debated individually, although even then the goal should be to arrive at fact rather than let everybody dream up their own internal reality.

                  • +3 votes

                    @Almost Banned: Go up to outer space and see if the Great Wall can be seen. Should be easily provable to have someone do that.

                    2000+ years of no evidence whatsoever of the existence of a God but plenty of evidence showing the stories are likely to be man-made. I think it seems pretty clear cut to me. If God was real, why does he try his hardest to hide from us? Why does he not intervene when bad things happen? Why do good things happen and not because of him but people praise him as if it was his doing?

                    •  

                      @Guybrush57: The Great Wall issue has already been proven false - that is why I used it as an example. But some people still think its true.
                      Argumentum ad ignorantiam is a classic fallacy.
                      As for the problem of evil, it has been discussed for as long as philosophy has existed.

                  •  

                    @Almost Banned: I understand and totally agree with what you're saying. :)

        • +2 votes

          I don't follow religion but this logic is flawed. The difference lies in the logical reasoning behind certain beliefs. Mental capacity and competency rely on a persons ability to assess things and judge it based on their experiences, beliefs and views. They can justify and reason things - which makes them competent. Mental illness on the other hand is much more complicated and often impacts a persons ability to critically think, and judge things.
          Its kinda funny how a lot of people are aware of the need for tolerance and understanding, yet we simply can't seem to let go of judging others to the point we are accusing them of mental illness simply because of their differing belief systems. It seems we are just shifting from one extreme end of the scale to the other.

      • +6 votes

        The more you try to shove something down someone's throat, the more likely they are to throw up all over you

        No one goes out of their way to attack Hindus, Sikhs and Buddhists, because they don't stand in the street screaming at you or send you constant violent propaganda

        •  

          Plenty of people attack Sikhs, mistaking them for Muslims. That's just one example of the stupdity of religious intolerance.
          Is including a tract really shoving something down someone's throat, or violent propaganda? Your threshold for difference seems ridiculously low.

          • +7 votes

            @Almost Banned: Like I said, no one goes out of their way to attack Sikhs

            Complaining about religious intolerance is the exact same thing as the school bully complaining that no one wants to be his friend anymore
            Perhaps decades of intolerance towards dozens of groups of people, child sex abuse scandals and mountains of violent propaganda have caught up?

            And how in the world do you not consider a picture of a man nailed to a cross with blood dripping not violent? Or the idea of being burnt alive for eternity in hell? You must be seriously desensitized

      • +14 votes

        I'm all for tolerance and respect for other people's beliefs, until they start disrespecting my beliefs, or lack thereof, and start preaching their intolerance to me.

        Those who can make you believe in absurdities, can make you commit atrocities.

        • +1 vote

          Your first sentance is on the money there

        •  

          That is if you assume anyone can make you believe anything.

          I try not to let this stuff get to me and look at the persons motivation. If they think they know something I don't and are trying to help me (in this case avoid the flames) I'm just polite and ignore it and get on with my day. I get more annoyed with religions where it's about them rather than me (e.g. Mormons where they are trying to convert me to get themselves into heaven, the original pyramid scheme with 144,000 top earners).

          I've done the same thing with deals, or car advice (noticing problems/sounds with cars around the place). If I think I know something and it may be helpful to someone else I'll politely tell them. I've had people be really appreciative, and I've had people snap the shits. Doesn't bother me either way.

          • +1 vote

            @Abaddon: To expand on my : "Those who can make you believe in absurdities, can make you commit atrocities."

            Case in point : suicide bombings

            Muhammad Abu Wardeh, who recruited terrorists for suicide bombings, was quoted as saying: "I described to him how God would compensate the martyr for sacrificing his life for his land. If you become a martyr, God will give you 72 virgins, 72 wives and everlasting happiness."

            • +6 votes

              @Geekless Belle: As George Carlin once put it: "We pray to God to destroy our enemies. Our enemies pray to God to destroy us. Somebody's gonna be disappointed. Somebody's wasting their time. Could it be… everyone?"

            • +1 vote

              @Geekless Belle: Definitely not an OzBargainer, we'd be checking the fine print, check the comments to see if it'll just get refunded. Does shopback include a code for virgins.

              Mods would definitely unpublish, they didn't even specify what kind of virgins, could be men… but probably sheep!

      • +1 vote

        I find it hilarious that you just said, that calling people with religiosity mentally ill is grossly offensive to the mentally ill! LMFAO….. I think you might be onto something!