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Little Snitch "10th Anniversary Sale" 50% off - Mac OSX Privacy Software - $17.48 for Single License

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Hi guys. First post here which I hope some people will find useful. This is a fantastic program for your Mac and now half price!
Here is a link to the overview. https://www.obdev.at/products/littlesnitch/index.html

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  • +1 vote

    Great app - got it in a bundle a few years back and it's been one of my first installs on any new Mac I'm using ever since.

  • +1 vote

    $17.48 single license.
    Definitely worth if you want to control your Macs network connections etc. Have been using this app for years with little problems.

  • +1 vote

    must have app for Mac OSX.

    once u have this you can pirate everything else, har har har matie lol

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    Thanks, hopefully there is no V4 coming out to account for this discount.

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      They were pretty good last time. They announce a new version and I think a 3 month window for those who recently purchased to upgrade for free. I qualified with my serial despite buying it more than six months before.

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    Would it be an oxymoron to use this on a Hackintosh lol. I don't know anything about this app except that it can help stop apps/system calling home, that's something I'd be interested in….have taken up the offer cheers trappy76 +1

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    I first started using LittleSnitch back in 2008 and paid the full $25USD. This bargain is on par with the cost of an upgrade license. Since then I have only needed to pay twice for an upgrade. Big vendors selling end point security could learn a few things from the Snitch.

  • +2 votes

    Very generous licence agreement too.

    Single licence is not based on number of devices, but users.

    If you have a few Macs you can unstall it on all of them as long as you are the only user.

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      Doh. I actually bought two single licences for our two Macs. Oh well.

  • +4 votes

    This is 17.48 USD - $24.30AUD.

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    I currently use Intego software for an antivirus+firewall solution. Anyone use this… AND… Little Snitch simultanesously?

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    Thanks OP for the post! Bought one. Until this posting, being a "newbie" with a Mac (always been a Windows user for years), I wasn't aware of such possible issues. Had always had the impression that Mac is relatively safe.
    By the way, was told Macs did not needed antivirus… again this is from doing light research on the topic, there wasn't much advertised for antivirus for Macs and was also told by the people at Apple that it's not usually required. Any one caring to shed some light on it would be much appreciated! Thanks!

    • +3 votes

      Anyone telling you that "antivirus is not needed" is lying. Unless your operating system is installed on a non-writable medium, like a CD-ROM (e.g. some Linux "Live CDs"), there will always be ways for viruses to get into your system. Even a "Live CD" is not entirely safe, you can always boot up a clean system with it, but then a virus can still install into your computer's memory, and will stay there until you turn the computer off or reboot.

      That said, some operating systems are better than others. The operating system part of Mac Os is based on Unix, an old and venerable OS that has been around for longer than windows, and was designed from the ground up to be a multi-user system, so security was designed in. Compare with MS Windows, where security had to be "bolted on" after it became a problem. Unix-like operating systems are not fully immune, however, there have been a couple of successful virus attacks in the last decade or so (Sendmail and JPEG library attacks, from memory).

      But it's not only the operating system that you need to worry about. If your web browser is "infected" with an add-on that sends your data elsewhere, then your banking log-in details can be stolen, and a lot of other personal information too. Look at how often web browsers get updated - most of those updates aren't to add extra features, they are to fix bugs that are being exploited by viruses, so that gives you an idea of how vulnerable you are to viruses.

      •  

        Thanks Russ for the comments!
        It's funny how the Apple website makes little mention of requirements for Anti-virus, etc. whereas one can find more info on the topic on the Microsoft website. As mentioned, being a newbie in the Mac world, it just makes it harder that most the more famous vendors making anti-virus for Windows does not do the same for Mac which sort of made me thought that it's not a problem at all…

        Recommendations from the OZbargain community is much appreciated as always!

      • +1 vote

        It depends on what you use the computer for. If you use software with a spotty history (Flash is an uncontroversial example), software from dubious sources (the most successful malware installation I'm aware of was distributed with a pirated version of Microsoft Office), browse dubious websites or use software that is not GateKeeper signed or sandboxed, you should consider anti-virus software. If you regularly send and receive files on platforms where viruses are more common you should also consider anti-virus software so that you don't propagate viruses (even if they don't affect your system).

        For a lot of users of OS X turning off ‘Open ”Safe” files after downloading’ in Safari and leaving GateKeeper at its defaults is sufficient. That might sound controversial but the kind of user I'm referring to lives in Safari, Preview, Mail and the iLife suite. Maybe they have something from the App Store too. There's not a lot of room for security issues there and where there is, there is little payoff to a generalised attack (the kind of thing anti-virus software picks up).

        The UNIX security model by itself is a small part of the OS X security story. If I inadvertently execute some badware under the UNIX model, it's running as me and can trash all my files, etc. It can't ruin system files or other users files—unless it has a privilege escalation exploit, and even then, not under El Capitan with SIP—but who cares if the system files are okay if my stuff is gone. This is where Sandboxing and GateKeeper come in, the former restricts processes capabilities and the later lets Apple blacklist a rogue developer. These features aren't a panacea as developers have to opt-in, users have to not disable them and the sandbox has to have (relatively fine grained) holes poked in it for an app to do anything. (They're also not unique to OS X.)

        All that is a long way of saying "antivirus is not needed" isn't always a lie.

  •  

    Brilliant deal - been using this for years

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    good deal been using this for many years already

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    I had this installed once and found it unbelievably annoying to use. Dialogues popping up all the time. I know that's the point but has anyone else had the same experience?

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      You can edit the rules that pop up so they are not that restrictive.

      like in Safari or firefox as a broswer you can set the rule to ANY IP on Port 80 (http) and 443 (https) is Allowed etc. pretty stupid to be setting up separate rules for each site you visit!

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      Yes. Using it now. Should have everything as default allowed but allow you to drill in and block as needed.