expired No Toll Charges across The Sydney Harbour Bridge and Tunnel on Anzac Day from 12am to 12pm

1530

A lot of people don't know about this freebie, but for the past twelve years, the tolls on the Harbour Bridge and Tunnel have been waived on Anzac Day mornings to help people get to dawn services.

So if you live north of Sydney Harbour and are the type of person who refuses to use toll roads based on principle or whatever, this is your once a year chance to get a free ride into the city on the Harbour Bridge or Harbour Tunnel. That is, unless you'd like to try this method of getting free crossings of the Harbour Bridge, which should work every day of the year.

Comments

  •  

    Heaps of road closures though …

  •  

    Thanks for letting us know.

  • +8 votes

    Ozbargain meetup there? Honk to let people know you're there. Will be spending the day crossing the bridge back and forths.

  • +2 votes

    Do laps back and forth to get the most value.

  •  

    So this freebie is only for going south? There is still toll to go north over the bridge.

    • +5 votes

      There hasn't been a toll to go north over the bridge since 1970.

      •  

        Thanks.
        I never known this.
        I'm using Here maps, and it always consider this bridge toll free (both directions).

        How about the tunnel? is it free to go north as well?

        •  

          Sure. If it did not track the bridge policy there would be an imbalance because people would prefer the bridge to go north.

          However there are tolls on some approach roads to the tunnel.

      •  

        nvm… sort of answered.

  •  

    Is it just me or do other people not know the difference between 12am and 12pm? Is it noon to midnight or midnight to noon?

    •  

      Midnight to midday.

    •  

      There was no need to neg a civil question. Have a plus-vote.

    • +4 votes

      It is just you.

    • +1 vote

      Easy way to remember is to add a minute

      12:01am is 1 minute into the next day. Which means 12:00am must be midnight

      12:01pm is 1 minute past midday. Which means 12:00pm must be midday.

      Easy!

      • -1 vote

        12:01pm is 1 minute past midday. Which means 12:00pm must be midday.

        What a revelation!

        This can be applied to all hours of the day!

        1:01pm is 1 minute past 1pm, which means 1pm must be 1pm!

        Try it at home!

      •  

        For clarity, 2359 or 0001 is preferable to simply stating midnight. Which side of midnight does it fall on? Same with midday - 1159 or 1201 is more clear.

        • +5 votes

          Yeah, it really irks me when statements say: Your service expires 21 April. Is that 0000 + 1s or 2359 + 59s? Or sometime during the day?

          No better when they say midnight 21 April. Is that between 20th and 21st or between 21st and 22nd?

          Best if they write 2359 21 April.

        • +1 vote

          @greenpossum: if only there was an Australian standard for denoting time and schools taught 24 hour time as standard time. ADFP 102 should be the handbook all Australians consult when they write. It's not a restricted publication and is readily available on the internet.

        •  

          For clarity, 2359 or 0001 is preferable to simply stating midnight. Which side of midnight does it fall on? Same with midday - 1159 or 1201 is more clear.

          Not really.

          0000/12 AM is midnight and 1200/12 PM is midday. They are specific moments in time just as distinct as 2359/11:59 PM or 0001/12:01 AM and 1159/11:59 AM or 1201/12:01 PM.

        •  

          @greenpossum:

          Yeah, it really irks me when statements say: Your service expires 21 April. Is that 0000 + 1s or 2359 + 59s? Or sometime during the day?

          Logically expiry should be at the beginning of the day stated. Just as when something is stated to end at "5 PM" it ends at 5:00 PM not 5:30 PM, 5:59 PM nor an infinitesimal moment before 6:00 PM. However, in practice expiry dates usually refer to the moment at the end of the day stated if not specified more precisely.

          No better when they say midnight 21 April. Is that between 20th and 21st or between 21st and 22nd?

          Midnight 21 April is within 21 April and the first moment after 20 April. However, often the moment in time 24 h later is misstatedly intended.

        •  

          @niggard:

          if only there was an Australian standard for denoting time and schools taught 24 hour time as standard time.

          The status quo is already unambiguous, the confusion simply arises from people's lack of understanding.

          If our systems of time were sought to be improved, the focus should be on metric time.

        •  

          @Scrooge McDuck:

          Logically expiry should be at the beginning of the day stated. Just as when something is stated to end at "5 PM" it ends at 5:00 PM not 5:30 PM, 5:59 PM nor an infinitesimal moment before 6:00 PM. However, in practice expiry dates usually refer to the moment at the end of the day stated if not specified more precisely.

          Unfortunately it's not logical in the real world. But the slack tends to be in the consumer's favour. I have had texts saying it will expire 21 April but it's still active morning 22 April.

          Even worse still are those texts saying things expiry in 3 days. 3 days from now, 3 days from next midnight, 3rd day after today? Who knows?

          Face it, the best practice is a date and a time, and timezone too. It's not hard and doesn't take up lots of characters.

      • -3 votes

        Easy way to remember is to add a minute

        12:01am is 1 minute into the next day. Which means 12:00am must be midnight

        12:01pm is 1 minute past midday. Which means 12:00pm must be midday.

        Easy!

        That really isn't a logical mnemonic.

        Here's a counter-example which uses the same reasoning as yours:

        Easy way to remember is to subtract a minute.

        11:59pm is 1 minute before the next day. Which means 12:00pm must be midnight.

        11:59am is 1 minute before midday. Which means 12:00am must be midday.

        Easy!

    •  

      This seems to be a legitimate question, so I'll answer at face value to help.

      All you need to remember is that when all the hands of a clock face 12, it changes from whatever it was.

      11.59pm and 59 seconds is evening. Once it hits 12 o'clock exactly, it's AM.
      Same thing for noon.
      11.59am and 59 seconds is still morning. 12 noon on the button means it's now PM.

      Think of it in 24 hour time.
      23 hours, 59 minutes, and 59 seconds is the end of the day. There is no 24 "o'clock", it goes back to 00:00.00 to restart the new day, and a new "AM".

      AM = ante meridiem (latin for before noon/mid-day)

      PM = post meridiem (latin for after noon/mid-day)

  •  

    No mention of RRP

  •  

    i try to watch that youtube & dont understand……must be meπŸ˜‚

    • +4 votes

      There's one set of toll booths on the northern side of the bridge for the leftmost two lanes, and another set of booths on the other side of the bridge in the CBD for all other lanes. These two sections are separated by a concrete barrier for most of the way except for a bit which is protected by those plastic bollards.

      By smashing through the barriers separating the two sections and damaging your car in the process, you can slip from the lanes which are yet to pay the toll over to the lanes which have already paid their toll.

      Cost of repairs to your car: $300. Not having to pay a toll: Priceless.

  •  

    WOWOWOW what a saving.

  •  

    NOTHING SAYS OZZIE OZZIE OZZIE THAN A FREE TOLL OVER A BLOODY BRIDGE!

  •  

    Sydney has Toll booths? ;-; poor sydney . here in Perth its 0 , and it better stay that way ;-)

    •  

      Sydney has over two dozen toll booths… the SHB should be free though as they'd have recouped many times over the construction cost in the 100 years… the toll is a congestion charge…

  •  

    The only thing better than not having to pay the bridge toll on ANZAC day is not having to pay it every other day of the year, in Yen ;)

    •  

      Wait? so you convert some coins to a ton load of worthless zen coins and the toll booth accepts it? which zen coin is it
      You should make a OZbargain Forum post telling everyone of this fantastic news

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