This was posted 2 years 5 months 23 days ago, and might be an out-dated deal.

  • expired

Anet A8 Desktop 3D Printer Prusa i3 (US $146.99) AU $189.00 (45% off, EU Plug) Delivered @ GearBest

180
mansunz

Note - the new model A6 can be picked up for $50 more here (thanks unifex)

Anet A8 Desktop 3D Printer Prusa i3 DIY Kit
EU PLUG, BLACK

A cheap though reasonably good 3D printer. Requires a bit more than half a brain decent intelligence, time and self-discipline to set up and maintain. Some good feedback on this deal and roughly $13 $23 cheaper with the code.
Be aware it has an EU plug, so you'll need a converter or straight up replacement local power supply, e.g from Jaycar. Don't try and hack it into your wall socket (or do, I'm not the fun police/WHSO).

Do not operate unattended, due to some questionable wiring. (thanks Menvert)

Lazy copy-paste:
Main Features:
● Engineered to provide redefined usability, quality, performance
● Made from the piano-black laser-cut acrylic frame. To maintain the garage-built feel and the handmade charm
● It is the unassembled DIY kit, provide you an unforgettable step-by-step learning experience of the 3D printer from scratch. As long as you have a passion for creativity, you can not afford to miss this product
● Suitable for a wide range of customers, young or old, professional or amateur etc.
● Multiple 3D printing filament supportable, support ABS / PLA / wood / nylon PVA / PP / luminescent
● 220 x 220 x 240mm printing volume, just right for you
● All metal pulleys for improved functionality and performance
● Quick-release feed gears for faster and fluent filament feeding
● High printing precision, stainless steel rail rods, gears, bearings and connectors for smoother movement
● Operating system: Windows XP / 7 / 8 / 10, Mac, Linux
● Working environment: Temperature: 10 - 30 Deg.C, humidity: 20 - 50 Deg.C
● Firmware version: V1
● Without filament

Performance parameter:
- Engraving area: 220 x 220 x 240mm
- Frame material: acrylic plate
- Platform board: aluminum base
- Nozzle quantity: single
- Nozzle diameter: 0.4mm
- Layer thickness: 0.1 - 0.3mm
- Memory card offline print: SD card ( not included )
- Print speed: 100mm/s
- Supporting material: ABS, luminescent, nylon PVA, PLA, PP, wood
- Material diameter: 1.75mm
- File format: G-code, OBJ, STL
- XY-axis positioning accuracy: 0.012mm
- Z-axis positioning accuracy: 0.004mm
- Voltage: 12V
- Host computer software: cura, repetier-host

Related Stores

GearBest
GearBest

closed Comments

  • +1 vote

    LOL half a brain lol 3d printers r far from being plug n play paper printer, a long way to go… if that happens, daiso and many stores need to change half their product range lol

    •  

      Daiso and similar are under not threat from 3D printers. Even if they were plug and play, printed 5 times faster and didn't set your house on fire, the process isn't simple (except for printing silly toys) and filament isn't cheap.

      • +1 vote

        see if you can tell me the same in ten years time. Filament or any upcoming material cost will be driven down real fast once each household gets a hand on a printer. it is that simple.
        i would have import a whole machine to made them here and it cost about 90k AUD or so. The cost of material when there arent enough install base and user base to made locally will be high. Australia has enough resource to produce those locally even export them if we have economically profitable.

        simple as that.

        for the next five years you are right, but just as netflex youtube stream roll the current TV and News media… that time WILL COME!

  • +5 votes

    I am happy with my A8, I didn't have unrealistic expectations for a ~$250aud 3d printer, Mine needed a bit of searching/creativity to figure out how to mount the x-axis belt to the print head as the provided hardware no longer matched any video or was absent…

    Also don't expect their deals to reliably work… last time it said 63 available, but when you go to buy it says sold out… ended up paying the ($20 extra) normal price

    But, yeah not remotely plug and play, around 5 hours to put together, endless other hours leveling the bed, working out how to use the SW and etc. etc.

    I recommend putting a fire alarm on or near it too… never operate unattended…

    • +1 vote

      And use an extraction fan to vent to outside.

      Do lots of research on Youtube to realise just how hard 3D printers are to use and obtain good results.

      Appears to have a large build volume compared to many earlier models. Of course massively increases print time if you try to use all the volume. Useful if you want to print a long and narrow model.

      •  

        I have an A8. It took 5 days to print something less than half the maximum printing height.

        • +1 vote

          Then there may be something wrong with your slicer, it is no slower than any other i3 clone.

        •  

          @me3: I use Cura.
          The settings were on 'fine'. I can't recall what those settings were specifically.

          What do you slicer do you use?

          BTW - I didn't think that was slow?

        •  

          @0xFFFF:

          5 days???! You are printing very very very slowly. Normally a maximum sized print will take 1-2 days at most.

        •  

          @Jangle:
          I just whack the 'Go' button and walk away. I have an IP camera for when I want to check up on it (also recording at 1fps).

          What slicer are you using?
          What settings are you using?

        • +1 vote

          @0xFFFF:

          I choose my slicer based on what I'm printing - Cura, S3D, Slic3r.
          Same with settings - depends upon what's printing & type of filament (etc).
          There is no 'perfect setup for all occasions'. That's for sure.
          Generally I print at 50-60mm/sec

        •  

          @Jangle:
          Sounds like your setup is far from standard. Any mods you'd recommend?

        • +1 vote

          @0xFFFF:

          Hey mate, what was the model you were trying to print? 5 days is a long time. I have used all slicers, currently Simplify3D (paid) and Craftware (free). I actually prefer Craftware, and use it over the paid option 90% of the time.

          With a 0.4 nozzle on an A8, using 0.2 layer heights and a couple of shells you should get good, fast prints with Craftware with mostly default settings.

          The visualisations in Craftware on the Gcode page are great. I export the gcode from Craftware and upload to Repetier host running on a Raspberry Pi, nothing to stop you doing this with the SD card or any of the software that direct attaches.

          Hope this helps.

        • +2 votes

          @0xFFFF:

          Further, I have tried many mods with this printer, the below are the only ones I would recommend to start without complicating things further

          https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:1872162
          https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:2045010
          Both are great improvements, screw printer to table/MDF once Y axis rework is installed.

          https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:2121279
          Great duct for the standard blower

          Do not use any of the "anti Z wobble" mods, they actually increase the likelyhood of problems (the leadscrews are meant to be free, the rods are the thing keeping things on the straight and level). Same with cable chains, they will introduce random noise in the prints.

          Finally, print on glass for PLA/PETG - a glazier will charge all of $10ish for a couple of 4mm glass sheets cut tot he bed size. The type of glass does not matter.

        •  

          @Jangle:
          I would agree with the no perfect settings comment, you will change settings and indeed slicers for various jobs once you get the hang of it all.

        •  

          @me3:
          I was trying to print a plague mask from Thingiverse: https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:2330172
          Printing at .1 with a .4 nozzle.
          Thanks for the advice. I'll check out Craftware tonight.
          I'm not terribly keen on trying out paid for software like Simplify3D until I'm happier with the overall performance of the printer.

        •  

          @0xFFFF:

          No problems, Craftware is more than fine for 90% of things in my experience.

          Well, that model certainly explains a few things, it is quite large - there is no fast way to print this other than dropping the resolution by layer height I am afraid. Good luck!

  •  

    Always want to get one of these but never figure out how to choose mine one, any tips/ideas?

  •  

    Should be fun to play with… Thanks

    Where/Which filament should I get? Are the ones from gearbest any good?

    •  

      Hobbyking pretty much have the cheapest I could find, the quality seems fine, my attempt to use PETG isn't going so well, it's hard to make it stick… PLA works well though

      • +1 vote

        I bought a roll of Black PETG from Hobbyking. It came vacuum sealed with silica gel desiccant but when I tried printing it had clearly absorbed quite a bit of moisture (lots of steam bubbles). I took it straight from the sealed packet and started printing so there was no time for it to absorb moisture so must have been at the manufacturer. I dried it for 4 hours in a toaster oven weighing it before and after showing that it lost some number of grams (can't remember exactly but something like 5 grams). Tried printing again and it now prints well. So don't assume filament is dry straight from the supplier. Moisture really screws with print quality.

    •  

      Start with PLA, these guys have good rolls

      https://3dfillies.com/

      I have gone through at least 10, as well as a few PETG rolls

    •  

      https://3dfillies.com is a great suppler.

      •  

        You'd want them to be for that price!
        Not very OzBargainy IMO.
        I've used HobbyKing & eBay. Never paid more than $15 for a 1Kg roll ABS, PLA, Glow in the dark, Fluro, …

        • +1 vote

          3DFillies is one of the cheaper local suppliers.
          Sure you can save buying from HK & China - same with everything.

        •  

          Consistency is key with filaments, happy to pay as the product has been great over time.

  • +2 votes

    I just had one from gearbest, the shipping was pretty fast it took 2 weeks to arrive but someone has experienced a longer shipping time.

    After the arrival, I needed watch youtube while assembling in order to do it without a big mistakes. I broke one of the frame part during the process but i was able to use glue to fix it and now it is still fine.

    I have crimped some wires just to have a peace of mind and it is easier to pull out and push back the cables for upgrades later on. I have also ordered a mosfet and planned to solder the wires into the heatbed so that the printer becomes much safer to leave it for a long hour printing job when I need to go out for a short time.

    Also You will need to upgrades quite a bit of parts in order to have a good print quality. Most of the parts can be printed but some parts need to be purchased from eBay. That's something you may want after the safety upgrade.

    So far I am addicted to this thing and I am spending hours everything to look things up just to print some nice stuffs!

    For fun stuffs and printer upgrades: https://www.thingiverse.com/
    FB group that I always ask for help: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1696500133995810/

  •  

    As someone who just bought and assembled one - get some spare throats and a spare or 2 heatblocks and nozzles. Or complete heatblocks with throats and thermisters. You can thank me later as you will break one at least

    •  

      Which one would you recommend? Maybe a complete heatblocks is easier for replacement as it may take time to find out the issue?

  •  

    Maybe its just me but I was not sure what I was doing and overtightened the throat and it snapped, so easy to see the problem :)
    Then the replaceent throat came a week later from ebay and installed it but again not sure what I was doing diddnt fix it correctly to the heatblock and then it oozed out and cemented the throat to the heatblock and in attempting to undo it ruined the thermister :)

    So another week waiting for a replacement heatblock with thermister … Could have just got the thermister wired but was trying to get it finally going.

    I would probably get the 3 pack of heatblocks for about $11 USD , just to have some spares of everything :) 0.4 nozzle size 1.75mm filament size

  •  

    Do not operate unattended
    .

    It took 5 days to print something

    Not quite there yet for me, but $200 ………. I remember looking at a similar 3D printer not that long ago at $2000

  •  

    I actually had my smoke alarm go off on the weekend when printing, the model had come free from the print bed and was melting up against the nozzle heat-block, no flames, but was enough to get me to run inside from the garden and check it… been meaning to make a box for placing it outside in a spot where fire isn't a problem, then I can do those big models…

  • +1 vote

    I have one of these. It is a great kit to learn the essentials of 3D printing but it is not plug and play. Many upgrades for this model appear on thingiverse, and lots of people get great results out of the box.

    You should not leave any 3D printer unattended, they all have nozzle temps of over 200C.

    Currently, have mine set up with bowden extruder and BLtouch, quality is sensational for the price.

  • +3 votes

    YMMV. A mate of mine has this and has had no problems, but mine came with holes missing from the acrylic frame which I had to drill out myself, heat bed came scratched up and the mainboard ended up being faulty (bad memory causing gcode to corrupt itself mid print). I got a partial refund from GearBest for US$30 which paid for a new mainboard.

    Some considerations to think about with this printer:

    1. It is a kit. It will take a bit of tinkering to get right. Even the YouTube instructions are wrong at times, telling you to use the wrong screws and mount the heat bed bracket upside-down.
    2. The power supply will definitely not conform to Australian safety standards - you're screwing a live 240V cable into a terminal block. Throw away the mains cable they give you and get a proper one from Jaycar or something. Make sure you use crimp connectors on your wiring for added conductivity.
    3. The heat bed connector is a bit dodgy and can burn out from movement. People have been soldering the heat bed power direct to he bed, and going so far as to using a MOSFET on the hot end and heat bed.
    4. Even if you get it up and running, there is a bit of fine tuning to get your print quality right. https://www.facebook.com/groups/1068531466501015/ This is another good support group for builds, tweaking, calibration and mods.
  • +3 votes

    Hi op,do you mind update this deal with code mansunz?

  •  

    Don't let gear best take your money and sit in it for weeks. The processing times are super long.

  • +1 vote

    Have had my a8 for a few months and loving it. It's a good printer for the price. I got it not knowing much about 3d printing and have learnt alot. There is alot of support online for this printer and really good how to's. A must is the mosfet mod to bypass the heating of the heat bed from the board as it can cause your connections to burn out.google "a8 mosfet mod". Will cost you all of $9 to do. If you are on the fence with this one I say go for it and have hours of fun!

  • +3 votes

    I am honoured. Thanks.

  •  

    Great deal, cheers OP!

  • +1 vote

    Ended up ordering an A6 (newer model) for $40 more. Comes with 1/2 kg of material and has a few incremental improvements so was worth it. I purchased a spool of material and got shipping all free for the A6.

  • Top