expired [Android] Free : Automatic Call Recorder (ACR) Pro (Was $5.49) @ Google Play

2931

This one is free.. grab it before offer expires
Ratings 4.5/5 :)

Automatic call recorder PRO, in this version:
- Full features, free up to date & premium support
- All ads were removed

This is the automatic call recorder pro with 2 ways recording, best phone call recorder free for android.
By downloading auto call recorder pro free now, you can record any incoming calls and outgoing call with high quality. Call recording is automatic and very reliable.
Call recorder is very easy to use, You can set which calls are recorded to white list and which are ignored.
You can manage your recording files, listen to the recording, add notes and share it. Synchronized to the cloud as well. You can also set a conversation is important, save it and it will be stored in the important category.
Many functions for call recording, all you need is in this call recording app

Features:

Auto call recorder pro with a lot of features
- 2 ways recording call
- Record calls automatically with high quality while you in incoming calls or outgoing calls.
- Organize your call records. You can view list of files with order by time, by names.
- Listen to recordings, view detail information of files such as: size, location
- Save recordings to internal & external storage (SD card).
- Call control with volume adjustment right inside the call app
- Call log history
- Record all telephony conversations.
- Play audio recorded conversations.
- Flag a recordings as an importance
- Keep calling on call with no affection, the app will run smoothly in the background
- Confirmation for saving the recorded call.
- Support lots of recording formats (mp3, amr, wav)
- Support white list, all numbers or contacts in white list will be recorded.
- Support black list, number in black list will be ignored
- Able to set source (Mic, voice call, a video camera)
- Enable/disable record incoming call
- Enable/disable record outgoing call
- Password to protect privacy
- Lock and protect recorded items to prevent from auto-cleaning
- Record a phone call (telephone recorder)
- Voice recorder, audio recorder for both side of call party
- Make hidden call recorder without alerting or notification while in the call
- Record phone calls by a tap, tape a call to start or stop services, you can also enable automatic call recordar mode
- Share recorded files: Easy to share your recordar file via popular services likes SMS, Email, Dropbox, …

Best Android Tool

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closed Comments

      • +1 vote

        Yeah not sure why negged so much.

        • +1 vote

          Yeah, I don't get why people do it either.

        •  

          Because you're not breaking the law if the other party agrees to the call being recorded.

          "Hi <insert dodgy telco> representative, just want to let you know this I'm recording this call. Are you okay with that?"

          Personally I don't have a need to automatically record every call but I used to have an app that would allow you to manually record calls and it came in handy a few times. Wish I'd used it a few weeks ago dealing with a new supplier who since denied claims relating to their product during our initial call.

  • +1 vote

    Laws about recording without the other party knowing/consenting can vary by state… Be mindful, I guess.

    •  

      Is it actually illegal though or is it just not admissable as evidence or something like this?

      • +2 votes

        NSW:
        Section 7 of Surveillance Devices Act 2007 makes it an offence punishable by up to five years’ imprisonment and/or $55,000 for a person to knowingly install, use or cause to be used or maintain a listening device to overhear, record, monitor or listen to a private conversation to which the person is not a party, or to record a private conversation to which the person is a party.

        It is not an offence to record a private conversation to which a person is a party if:
        - all of the principal parties to the conversation consent, expressly or impliedly, or
        - a principal party consents and the recording of the conversation:

        • +1 vote

          Which is very different to Qld where

          it is illegal to record a telephone call with a device physically attached to the telephone
          it is legal for a telephone call to be secretly recorded by an external device (e.g. Dictaphone) by a person who is a party to the conversation
          https://www.corneyandlind.com.au/resource-centre/schools/pri...

        • +1 vote

          @spaceflight: which doesn't apply because an app is neither attached nor external right?

        •  

          Yeah, read exactly this so uninstalled my app straight after! Had gotten it for free the last time it came. Not going to take the risk of huge penalties just cos it's free!

        • -1 vote

          @DerpFactory:

          It is illegal in qld to use an app

          Both rulings are from the 70s so apps were never part of it but an app is not external to the phone so are illegal

        •  

          @DerpFactory: Correct, until it is stated it is illegal, it is legal, or at least not illegal.

        • -2 votes

          @FabMan:

          The law in Qld already states it is illegal, it does not need to specify using an app to record.

        • +1 vote

          @spaceflight: So what does the law state in this regard?

        • -4 votes

          The law states that recording with an app is illegal

        • +5 votes

          @spaceflight:

          As far as I can tell, it is perfectly legal to record conversations you are involved in without permission.

          http://www.legalaid.qld.gov.au/Find-legal-information/Person...

          From Legal Aid Queensland:

          Recording private conversations
          In Queensland, it’s not illegal to simply record a conversation you’re involved in (either over the phone or face-to-face) without the consent of the other people involved in the conversation, but there are restrictions on what you can do with the recording. It is illegal to record private conversations that you’re not involved in - get legal advice.

          Publishing or communicating recordings of conversations
          Even if you were involved in a conversation that was legally recorded, it’s still illegal to communicate the conversation or publish it without the permission of the other people involved in the conversation (with some exceptions). However, you may be able to use it as evidence in court proceedings.

          It’s illegal to publish or communicate a private conversation that was listened to or recorded illegally and these recordings may not be used in court proceedings. Get legal advice.

          Do you remember this court case?:
          https://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/national/queensland/secret-...

          "but by law Gable Tostee was actually allowed to secretly record his Tinder dates."

        •  

          @spaceflight:

          "The law in Qld already states it is illegal, it does not need to specify using an app to record."

          Can you provide evidence to support that?

          -Edit-

          You did answer this to another comment.

        •  

          @FabMan:

          Yes that is correct however you need to consider what the relevant Acts state.

          it is illegal to record a telephone call with a device physically attached to the telephone

          As the act is fromm the 70s it doesn't consider apps but it would be easy to argue an app is physically connected to the phone as it is part of the physical phone.

          it is legal for a telephone call to be secretly recorded by an external device (e.g. Dictaphone) by a person who is a party to the conversation

          This is why your legal aid link says it is legal.

          But to be legal you need to use an external physical device

          https://www.corneyandlind.com.au/resource-centre/schools/pri...

          Or another

          http://brookewintersolicitors.com.au/it-is-legal-to-record-a...

          [@FabMan](/comment/5728445/redir

          Can you provide evidence to support that?
          -Edit-
          You did answer this to another comment.

          I already had, at the top of this thread.

          I don't know why someone negged it…

        • +1 vote

          @spaceflight:

          Laws do not have to specify all our legal activities, it is not mentioned that it is illegal to utilise smartphone apps, rather physically attached devices are illegal. That is specific, and not what an app is.

          I + that comment to make it neutral again, I can't stand the indiscriminate negging on this site, I like debates.

        •  

          @FabMan:

          The qld law is clear you need to use an external physical device. So recording a call while your phone is on loudspeaker is legal.

        • +2 votes

          @spaceflight:

          I don't consider that to be evidence of smartphone apps being illegal, due to the specific mention of a device physically attached. Applications are not physical devices as you know.

          "The qld law is clear you need to use an external physical device. So recording a call while your phone is on loudspeaker is legal."

          Wrong, it says it is legal to record with an external device, it does not state it is the only legal method of recording. How do you interpret that it is the only required method of recording?

        •  

          @FabMan:

          This is where you get into the letter of the law versus the spirit of the law.

          Yes the letter of the law doesn't say apps are illegal however the app is physically tied/attached to the phone. No phone means no app.

          It is clear that external devices that do not rely on the phone are legal

        • +3 votes

          @spaceflight: I disagree with your interpretation.

          Actually that court case I provided, Gable Tostee went to court after recording his conversation with Warriena Wright on a smart phone just before she died. That was allowed as legal evidence in the case, and considered valid. So there is a court case in QLD already showing it is not illegal.

        •  

          @FabMan:

          What's your number?

          I'll give you a call and see you in court ;)

        • +1 vote

          @spaceflight: Its gone to court, see the above.

        •  

          @FabMan:

          Tostee recorded an in person conversation so that's different to recording a phone call.

          it is legal for a face to face conversation to be secretly recorded by a person who is a party to the conversation

        • +1 vote

          @southeasternculture:

          Unless you make it publically known eg. By trying to use it in court or posting it on YouTube, how would authorities know?

        •  

          @spaceflight: every single word in a legislation is subjected to interpretation. You forgot the word device here. In today context it is very clear that an app does not fall into this category and was not in existence when the law was made. So it does not matter if the app is internal nor external to the phone. Unless the legislation is amended to include app recording then authority will have a hard time to get an app classified as a device and even in such case it would have a far reaching consequences beyond this matter.

        • +1 vote

          @FabMan:

          The law comes from the 70s, when there were only fixed line phones, and is intended to cover the situation when a physical listening device is directly coupled to the telephone lines.

          With modern mobile phones, there is no physically attached (to the telephone system) device. Wireless isn't physical.

          Further, phones have at least two processors - an HF processor (which does all the interaction with base stations, telephone systems, wifi devices, etc), and an application processor (which runs your apps and Android) which talks to it in a fairly high level way. It's done this way to maintain the integrity of a communications network that others are using too. Your hands are kept off the bit that's sending radio out.

          Given that, it could be argued that the application processor, and your call recorder app running on it, is in fact acting as an external recording device, in that it is external to the actual communications device (the RF processor). So it is therefore not illegal.

          I have no idea if that would fly in court or not. I'd love someone (who isn't me) to try. Also, both processors being on one SoC would be an obvious issue.

          Another observation is this. If you record your calls and end up with something that needs to be admissible in court, you could (in practice) just play the bloody thing back on speakerphone, record it onto a Dictaphone, and say that's what you did in the first place.

          Not that I'm suggesting anyone does that where it would be illegal. It's just an example of how stupid the law is.

          In fact it strikes me (once again) that the law is an ass that isn't kept up to date with changes in society.

          And it (again) strikes me that Australia's status as a federation of States each able to pass their own contradictory law, is a pita with lots of headaches and complications, for no real advantages (unless you're a jobsworth who makes money from creating or dealing with the headaches and complications). Any country where basic laws affecting your everyday life (I think Family Law is another area, despite a federal act as its basis) can change around you if you take a step to the right, and end up in SA not WA for example, needs its head examined.

          Most significantly, it should be legal for anyone to record anything that they are involved with, whether the other person(s) know(s) or not, and whether the audio is travelling over air or wires. It would help encourage more honest conduct by groups who tend not to be. I could have put at least one lawyer and one company director in jail, for a start.

        •  

          @NeBlackCat: Great input, thanks for the discussion.

          If we look at the spirit of the law as mentioned by someone else, it is legal to record your calls with an external device, so currently they don't have a problem with the call being recorded and used as evidence in court. They have an issue with a physical device being attached to record a conversation.

          So the problem is not the recording of the call but the method used. Why is attaching a device in the 70's an issue compared to an external device? In 71 when the law was made, what were the issues they were facing, wire tapping, answer phones being used? I don't know, but in principal the call itself is okay to be recorded.

        •  

          Seems a bit silly. The justice system and the government are missing a lot of evidence. It's only good if the big brother does it! By the way many people do it anyway and if you can't say something if it is being recorded why would you?
          The best is to inform people that their conversation might be recorded.
          It will always come handy about the details that you would have missed or forgotten otherwise. It is good to have a bit of freedom in life but Australia is a semi communist country anyway.

      •  

        https://www.lifehacker.com.au/2015/09/is-it-legal-to-record-...

        It depends on where you are and to a point why you are recording

    •  

      Anyone know the legality of this in WA? We are a 2 party consent state so probably illegal

    •  

      In NSW if you ever get pulled over by a cop they will usually start by letting you know they are recording the conversation if you don't say anything to the contrary you have complied consent, if you tell the Officer that you do not give permission for your voice to be recorded they immediately need to stop recording the conversation further recording of you is illegal and would not be permissible in court. A similar thing goes for radio in NSW, if you call a radio station (Studio line not reception) in NSW there is a general expectation your voice will be recorded and played on Radio but if the station calls you they need to make it clear they are recording you, this doesn't mean they have to say they are recording but it must be clear. But move down to Victoria and as long as you are an active member in a conversation you can legally record it without advising anybody, but if you record a conversation you are not a part of, that's illegal. Have only worked in Media in these two states so I'm pretty across the law here.

  • +12 votes

    Good find. I wish I'd had one of these apps when dealing with an insurer recently. They supposedly record all calls, but apparently the recording of a call that's now in dispute has been 'lost'. If I had my own recording, it would have saved me lots of stress and many $'000s.

    • +5 votes

      They do record them. Every single call, they record. How could they lose it? That doesn't make sense! I feel for ya, dude, that must've sucked.

    • +2 votes

      Of course they still have it.

      But that's why I insist on every contact be via email. That way they're careful what they say and if you're like us and end up at the ombudsman, you can quote it all back complete with day & time.

  • +3 votes

    Thanks OP. Now I can really carry out my threat against those pesky telemarketers. Every time they call, I tell them that I am recording the conversation, most of them will hang up when I tell them that. Some of them call my bluff and carry on talking.

  •  

    Is there a way / app to do this on iPhone? happy to pay Cash Money for a solution.

    •  

      you need to jailbreak your iphone if you want this feature

    • +19 votes

      Switch to Android and reap the benefits

    •  

      no decent apps because of iOS limitations.
      there are devices you can buy, the best ones record via bluetooth e.g. the pr200 but they cost > $100.
      i've got one and the audio/recording quality is pretty good, even in noisy places like shopping centres. also works as a normal audio recorder
      bonus: not having to jailbreak your phone

  • +4 votes

    Bear in mind there are two types of recording, mic and kernel. Mic is just awful. Kernel is a direct copy of the data sent to your phone so it's as clear as the call quality.

    However whether you can use kernel recording comes down the the, uh, kernel that your phone is using. Many manufacturer ROMS do not allow it. This may or may not be able to be remedied with third party kernels depending on your device.

    •  

      If it is a 2 way recording how does it record the other person if it doesn't have kernel access?

      This app lets me set the microphone or call as the audio source so I guess it has kernel access

      • +1 vote

        how does it record the other person if it doesn't have kernel access?

        Poorly. It uses the microphone you speak into, and some of the audio from the earpiece can be heard by that microphone. You'll be loud and clear in the recording, the other person on the call will be distant and quiet. This is why there are many one-star reviews saying "only records one side of the conversation".

        Works much better if you put the call on speakerphone, the microphone gets a much louder signal.

        • +1 vote

          Using a Sony Xperia phone I have the same experience - app records via microphone you speak into. Can't hear the other side of the phonecall.

          So I suppose the sony phone has NO kernel access and this app therefore has limited functionality. Workaround is to use speakerphone.

    •  

      does your one actually say 'kernel'? mine has 'mic' and 'voice call'

      •  

        No, he was just taking in general.
        Most of these apps do not work very well unless your system supports it.
        It seems like this is in the same boat but still worth a test

    •  

      Too bad mines an apricot one. Mic it is then

    •  

      good point. when i had an android phone, the app i used utilised mic recording. just to get a decent recording, i had to use the speakerphone :\

    •  

      One of the reasons to buy Xiaomi. Call recording comes built-in. Though it might not be the only thing ;-)

      •  

        I can't figure out if Xiaomi is state owned. But should that matter? I know the military have banned brands like Huawei. How safe is our information with Xiaomi?

  •  

    Thanks. Downloaded and will try it out.

  • +1 vote

    how does this one compare to the one from Appliqato?

    just make a comparison myself, the one from Appliqato is significantly louder (i have tried both mic/voice call recording method on this one). but this one does have some interesting feature like passcode, i think i will just stick with Appliqato

  •  

    The app requires permission to see device information, app activities and other stuff, is it normal?

    • +1 vote

      I assume things like device ID are requested as that's how the app can see your phone number Which would be useful in a dual SIM phone so you know what phone number the call was linked to.

    • +2 votes

      The app requires permission to see device information, app activities and other stuff, is it normal?

      Most apps these days ask for lots of permissions that seem dubious. I'm always suspicious of apps that want too many permissions for unknown reasons. Some of the permissions it asks for are normally a red flag for me, but for an app that does what this one does, those permissions may be necessary.

      However, the competing app "Automatic call recorder" by Appliqato doesn't request nearly as many risky permissions, so I think you're right to be wary. Having "directly call phone numbers" and "full network access" is a red flag for me.

    • +3 votes

      I have deleted the app just for safety measures.

  • +2 votes

    I’ll use this app to record all my calls to Telstra to show them what they promised and they cannot fulfill my NBN order, especially for the NBN case managers. I am so tired of what they are promising.

  •  

    There are a lot of reviews for this app that are 5 star with no comments, fake reviews?

  •  

    Do they have iOS version for iPhone?

  • +2 votes

    Thanks. Fyi an article concerning legality of recordings: https://www.google.com.au/amp/s/amp.theage.com.au/national/v...

    "In simple terms it is not illegal in Victoria, the Northern Territory or Queensland to record, without consent, a phone call you make or receive, or a private conversation you are having. However, in NSW, South Australia, Tasmania, Western Australia and the ACT it is illegal to record that phone call or conversation without consent.

    All states and territories have exemptions around the notions of public interest and also "express" and "implied" consent."

    • +6 votes

      Sad that we live in a society where the truth is illegal .

    • -1 vote

      Queensland is interesting because of this

      it is illegal to record a telephone call with a device physically attached to the telephone
      it is legal for a telephone call to be secretly recorded by an external device (e.g. Dictaphone) by a person who is a party to the conversation
      https://www.corneyandlind.com.au/resource-centre/schools/pri...

      Something I said above was

      It is illegal in qld to use an app

      Both rulings are from the 70s so apps were never part of it but an app is not external to the phone so are illegal

    •  

      So if I record the conversation in QLD but the person calling me lives in SA, which jurisdiction takes precedence? (I would assume the place where the recording is made?)

    •  

      Unless the law's changed in the last few months, it isn't illegal to record a private conversation in WA as long as you are both involved in it, and representing your own interests.

      But, as I said above, it's a joke that the law changes from state to state. It's supposed to be one bloody country.

  • +1 vote

    I find it really useful.
    For example when i am given isntructions at work I don't have to take note in case I forget. Particularly handy if i am driving.

    It works just brilliant for me.

    And who cares if it is illegal. I will never sue anyone

  •  

    Good so long as you don't have a phone with the latest version op Android . ie a newer phone .

    •  

      Not all Android phones have this functionality — doesn't matter how new they are. e.g. My old Xiaomi had it, but my current Moto doesn't.

  • +10 votes

    This appears to be a knockoff of ACR
    https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.nll.acr

    With what look like fake reviews I would be careful.

  •  

    I installed in on my S5 Marshmallow. My phone froze after recording the first time. Had to pull out the battery. Hope you have better luck.

  • +5 votes

    Upvoted before I saw it's not the real ACR. If you need something like this give the free version of ACR a go. The proper version us a fantastic app.

  • +1 vote

    Acr is the way to go I've found.

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