Why Are Some People Scanning Barcode of Products & Taking Pics Using Some App in Their Phones in Woolworths?

Why are some people scanning barcode of products & taking pics using some app in their phones in Woolworths, what are they doing?

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Comments

  • +2 votes

    Price comparison app most likely.

  • +6 votes

    Fitness/Diet app to get calories because they're still stuck believing the carbohydrate ideology.

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      I saw a person scanning baby formula and diapers they were not food items

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      What is the 'carbohydrate ideology'?

      • +11 votes

        Carbohydrates are a commie plot to weaken Western civilisation so it can be crushed and our blood used to stain the flags carried by our glorious comrades as they march into…. er what?

        Or a plot by our corporate overlord to fatten us up so we become lazy and buy more stuff, in cohorts with so-called 'bargain' sites that are anything but.

        Or a loonie left liberal politically correct plot to achieve something or other.

        But probably it's the fault of the Jews.

        Fight the carbs, sheeple!

        • +1 vote

          Wrong D C. It's the Russian bots again.

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          this was the response i was looking for, thank you comrade <3

        • +2 votes

          Paul Joseph Watson, is that u?

        • +3 votes

          @kenunderscore: Sleep well, comrade; for tomorrow the mighty eagle shall spread its wings and descend upon Woolworths.

          We will fight them in the deli, we will fight them near the frozen pizzas, and we will fight them in the confectionery aisle.

          We shall not surrender until our demands are met: the fall of capitalism, the damnation of carbs, the return of lemon & lime flavours to Life Savers and once again being able to buy a gift card with a gift card (don't forget CashRewards!), and make it 10% off!

          These vultures will disappear one of these days, and the sun will still shine forever!
          So it was, so it is, and so it always will be!

  •  

    Ask them is the obvious response

  • +1 vote

    Fighting monsters probably

    • +2 votes

      The user can also post and share their own labels. For example, the Rainforest Action Network has "labelled" a Kellogg's granola bar with information about the company's new commitments to reduce its impact on the environment.

      Hmm. Why does this sound suspiciously like Kelloggs is pulling themselves up by their grassroots.

  • +1 vote

    I saw the same today, Asian fella down in the Baby tin food isle taking photos and jotting notes

    • +4 votes

      Yeh, that was me in the baby tin food aisle. Anyway Godric, what were you doing with 12 packs of condoms, A roll of clingfilm and a bottle of Johnson's baby oil?

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      Checking current market price for reselling of formula?

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      For the Chinese semi-illegal export trade. Big money to be had sending formula to China due to Chinese not trusting baby formula made in China after the babies over there were killed and struck with health problems from dodgy Chinese suppliers. Chinese will not touch Chinese milk products for their babies so they get them semi-illegally from Hong Kong and other countries such as Australia via baby formula mules and distributors. People here are making a ton of money shipping to China, even when they pay retail prices to buy it. It's complete madness, but has been going on for a long time.

  • +1 vote

    We use an app to get an assessment of gluten risk.

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      Which app? I need something for dairy.

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        Gluten free eating directory app tells you where to buy stuff

        foodswitch is the one we use by scanning barcodes. Very useful for coeliacs. I don’t know if it does dairy, but I assume there is a similar app.

        • +1 vote

          Does it mention bacon? I noticed this morning that our bacon is labelled gluten free. It made me wonder what others are making bacon out of??

  • +1 vote

    My fitness pal app

  • +4 votes

    I get paid to do it by a marketing company that on-sells the data to the ABS to calculate the consumer price index.

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    As a diabetic there is an App I can use to check what is the better foods for ms to eat.

  • +1 vote

    Mystery Shoppers get paid about 5 dollars for completing surveys while in the store.

  • +1 vote

    Finance apps have suddenly become popular. They can break down your spend and show how much you are spending on avocados.

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    My daughter has a scanning program that informs her of the suitability of a product, or otherwise, for her very celiac son, my grandson. Essentially it checks products against a database for ingredients containing gluten and similar products.

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      I’m interested in this.

      What is a very coeliac (person), please? Isn’t a person either a coeliac or not a coeliac? How can someone be very coeliac?

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        My friend's family is very coeliac, but his test was inconclusive. He doesn't feel good when he eats gluten, but he still drinks beer sometimes. I guess he is a little coeliac? It's like Schroedinger's cat I guess. Schroedinger's coeliac

      • +1 vote

        To be honest I should have said totally gluten intolerant rather than very celiac. As you'd know there are degrees of gluten intolerance but no degrees of celiac disease.

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    It could be they are scanning products into a shopping app.

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    I have done it to contend any price arguments on specials at the checkout.

  • +1 vote

    You know the woolies app lets you scan items so you can create a shopping list??? It's probably them creating a weekly shopping list so things are entered in each time they shop.

  •  

    Perhaps: https://www.economist.com/news/asia/21732127-how-firms-down-...

    "THE first daigou, meaning someone who makes purchases on another’s behalf, were Chinese students studying abroad, who hauled desirable products home on behalf of family and friends. Adding a commission helped them pay their tuition fees. The spread of social-networking apps such as WeChat, China’s most popular, brought the business online. Daigou could then offer their services to friends of friends, and promote items they thought might appeal to their network. But whereas daigou in America and Europe procure mainly luxury goods for their customers—a function of high Chinese tariffs—in Australia they buy mainly vitamins, food and beauty products. And whereas luxury brands see daigou as a menace, undercutting sales in China, Australian firms have come to embrace them.

    There are perhaps 50,000 daigou, stalking the aisles of Australian shops and periodically stripping them bare. The small fry alone post 60,000 parcels to China every day. The biggest have grown into organised export businesses which funnel goods through China’s free-trade zones. Express delivery services to China have proliferated, and some 1,500 stores in Australia cater mainly to daigou. One such chain, AuMake, recently listed on the Australian Securities Exchange. Its bilingual sales staff can arrange for a purchase to be posted to China as soon as it has been rung up…"

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