Do You Pick up Calls from "NO CALLER ID"?

Do you guys pick up calls coming from NO CALLER ID? From my experience those calls are either from telemarketers or scammers, however some people have told me that you might potentially miss some important calls if you ignore them as those calls could be made from government authorities (police, ATO, RTA, etc)or the companies that you have service with (insurance company, bank, ISP).

What's your opinion and anyone care to clarify if those calls could actually be from government authorities?

I started a poll as suggested by tuzii

Poll Options

  • 100
    I never pick up calls from NO CALLER ID or any numbers that aren't saved in my phone book.
  • 303
    I never pick up calls from NO CALLER ID but I do answer calls from unfamiliar numbers selectively.
  • 236
    I answer calls from any numbers including NO CALLER ID.
  • 20
    I never had that problem as I receive important messages from my pigeon.

Comments

  • +25 votes

    Normally, telemarketer calls are from a displayed number…
    When that happens and if I am near a PC, I just google the number in time and you can see …… # of complaints with that number and I don't answer it.
    Then I block it … and then another similar number is displayed and I start over again LOL :-) . normally numbers from another state is a dead giveaway.

    Cheers

    •  

      too many callers use a fake number! Much time lost googling to find them on a spam list.
      Got 2 unlisted numbers solar and ink callers still call. Male callers are getting harder to be offended.
      Every caller I tell never to call again but if they do they get a mouth full.
      Largest idiots are printer ink sellers. Got an unrealistic offer so they wanted to send on invoice and talked me up to a grands worth. Of course goods never arrived, later insisted of an email confirmation so replied with order cancelled but they called 6 more times 4 times from different numbers, twice from silent ones.

      •  

        hi… I believe the correct term is toner pirate ;) I worked for a b2b company called Imagetec that used to be called Danka. So many dodgy stories about ink carts actually being refills or of low quality.

      • +1 vote

        I used to get bombarded with calls from Simply Energy.
        My stupid neighbour gave my number as a referral without consulting me.

        One day, they called again and I said that I joined with them (obviously lied to them) take me off their list and they never called me again.

        So to get rid of them, just state that you have taken their offer and they "may" remove you from their annoyance list :-)

        Cheers

      •  

        Was it Dunder Mifflin?

    •  

      I do this too, but I occasionally miss an importantish call, because some companies outsource their calls to shared call centres. So you'll get calls from some shitty telemarketer/pizza hut, on the same number as Lumo Entergy (they both use a callcenter in Dandenong).

    •  

      This is exact thing i miss after buying Pixel 2 , it automatically seaches mobile numbers in google and gives the business name and if its in spam register it would give suggestion about that

  • +12 votes

    No & numbers that aren't saved in my phone book, and for that matter most that are in my phone book

  • +17 votes

    The Google Phone app will actually flag suspected spam callers as seen in this image. It hasn't failed me once yet.

  • +27 votes

    If it's important they'd left a voice message. With government bodies they will sometimes send you SMS.

  • +5 votes

    We screen most of our calls with an answering machine. 95% of our calls hang up when they get to the answer machine. Anyone who wants to talk to you directly will leave a message. Our friends hang on and yell out, we pick these up.

    • +2 votes

      An answering machine - I remember those!

      If I'm trying to contact someone urgently, I usually won't leave a message - just hang up and call again.

      • +1 vote

        Then you won’t talk to people like me. If I want someone urgently I ring their mobile.

      •  

        Yes they were pretty good. Caught out a somewhat drunken associate leaving an abusive message lol. No mistaking who it was either. I don't think she would have had any memory of doing so too. It was a hilarious sceanario to record … no idea what it was all about though lol. 😂

  • +7 votes

    Need a poll

  • +2 votes

    Yes, but I answer it anonymously with a simple "Hello?"

    • +5 votes

      Sometimes I will answer in the style and tone of a recorded message. "Hello, you have called…."

  •  

    No, i totally avoid it. But i also avoid landlines, I google the number and then if the ringing hasn't ended and the google result tells me its normal, then i answer.

  •  

    No. If they are legit, I hope they will leave a voicemail.

  •  

    All "No caller ID" etc are auto-blocked on my android phone. Doesn't even ring.

    •  

      Which can be problematic, if it's from an emergency service.

    • +2 votes

      All "No caller ID" etc are auto-blocked on my android phone. Doesn't even ring.

      Same here.

      Which can be problematic, if it's from an emergency service.

      On the 1 occasion where this actually happened to me, the call came from a mobile.

    •  

      i've contemplated instant auto-answer for private calls. costs them a call and they get to listen to interesting background noise

  • +4 votes

    Where we live, we can only use a landline. We have no mobile coverage at our house. We are with Telstra. Up to about 3 months ago we were getting so many scam calls, the scammers would use our name, and also use our address. Telstra decided to make "silent numbers" free to all landline customers, we took the offer. We phoned all of our friends and relations when we started using it, and explained why, our scam calls have dropped to maybe two a month now. Whenever we go to Perth, we can see that mobiles have taken over the way that people communicate, in fact most of our friends dont have a landline. For so many people in regional Australia, land lines are all that they have.

    •  

      If you want mobile phone coverage, look up Mobile Black Spot programme and wait for next round

  • +4 votes

    I voted
    Good there was a pigeon choice

  • +15 votes

    I work in a public hospital and all of our outgoing phone calls do not show our work numbers.
    Something to think about if you are unwell and a doctor is trying to get in contact with you. Or if you are the next of kin and the emergency department is trying to contact you.
    Sure we can leave messages - but leaving a message telling you have an urgent appointment with an oncologist or your significant other is in ICU is not ideal.

    •  

      I'll take the risk. I'm pretty sure that I have never received a call from a hospital.

      •  

        Your loved ones are Invincible

      • +9 votes

        at one point my elderly mum's home phone number, that had been hers for 30 years, was mistakenly listed in a tourist guide as the local medical centre. after many calls where she told the caller they had the wrong number she gave up and just started taking appointments, all of them for the same time.

    • +1 vote

      In Qld now - at least down in the SE corner - Doctors have phones for their shift and these are used to call families and any other work calls.

      You can call that number if you have it - which you would if they left a message. Speeds things up a lot and less stress for the receiver of the messsge.

      Having been on the receiving end more than once, it is a mobile number.

      Yes, when the RN’s ring from ED or ward, it is either the switchboard number or no number.

    • +3 votes

      Why don't they use a switchboard number just in case the message isn't received, leaving a message with the switchboard?

      It's almost impossible to communicate with some hospitals. They need a digital revolution more than anyone.

    • +1 vote

      Spot on. I also work in a hospital and the outgoing calls come up with "no caller ID".

      It's often not appropriate to leave a message on voicemail.

      •  

        When is it not appropriate to leave a message on voicemail? I fail to understand this 'justification' that people use who don't leave voicemail.

        You have a reason for calling someone, for whatever reason that person cannot take your call and gives you the option to leave a message, rather than have the call ring out after 30 seconds.

        Care to enlighten me?

        •  

          It's an interesting question.

          I think the answer should depend on whether it's the person's personal mobile (and so, presumably, their access to their voicemail is private) or, say, a home answering machine.

          Obviously a home machine can be checked by anyone so, in that specific case, I can see why you'd not leave a message of a personal nature.

          As for hospitals blanking their number so there's no caller ID, to my mind that's irresponsible. Just set all outbound calls to main receptions number. That's what they do in the UK.

          Edit: autocorrect typo

        • +1 vote

          @kale chips suck: It's not as easy as putting the main switchboard number as caller ID. What our workplace found was that people ring back the main number without listening to the voicemail message (or perhaps there's no option for leaving a voicemail at all), then switchboard gets bombarded with phone calls saying, "Hi, someone rang me from there, I don't know who." Once we realised how many hours were being taken up by staff answering these phone calls & unable to help, we stopped sending our caller ID.

        •  

          @bcarp: So send a text message saying "John from xyz here. I need to speak with you, please call me on (main number), (personal extension). Please click that number to dial me direct." Format the message so that the number they dial - by tapping on it in the text, assuming they're in a smart phone - dials your main number, then pauses, then enters whatever combination gets to your extension.

          If your use a dedicated number from your number range only for this system you could have the PBX set up for immediate answer on that number, no human time needed at all, and the forwarding should be essential seamless. And you could quite easily use a proforma message for your outbound texts, either as a template in a mobile or, better, a web form staff could access from whatever device.

          Though in not sure about that last part being optimal for your specific situation. Maybe you'd just use a shared mobile for outbound? Then you could could code something so that if a call goes unanswered the phone offers to text the right message to the number?

          But, anyway, my point is there's ways around the problem that make life easier for everyone.

        •  

          @kale chips suck: Not a bad idea, but our staff don't have dedicated desks or extensions. When reception is busy, they go there. When phone calls swamp us, they use any desk & take the calls & process them. Other times, they're filing. Or scanning. Or chasing up accounts. Could be at any location at any time, and this can change on the fly as clients/customers/etc come in & out of the office door off the street. Most of the jobs don't require a phone, so there are way less extension numbers than staff; so it's not economically feasible to give each staff a phone with a number to carry around. No mobiles allowed on the job; we stopped that when we realised how much time discrete use of social media was consuming.

          The web form idea is interesting, but probably too expensive to implement (service subscription = cost). Staff would have to walk to the computer with internet access (time taken = cost). Yes, most of our computers are not internet connected; our internal network is "off line" for security purposes.

        •  

          @bcarp: Well, without knowing in detail your circumstance is difficult for me to give you a compete solution.

          From what you've said though, I'd install an asterisk PBX server in an old computer and buy as many cheap Android phones as needed, connect the Droid phones to the wireless network without a SIM, install a Sip VoIP client on the phones and set them up in the PBX as extensions. Set up an auto attendant menu on the PBX so people could navigate themselves to the right / least wrong person. I'd also get a SIM card with an unlimited SMS plan and connect it to the PBX for sending the outbound "Missed you" texts.

          Then, given your stance on social media, I'd block access to the internet from the phones completely. In this role, they're just mobile PBX extensions.

          You could likely do it all quite cheaply by hiring a PBX expert on fiverr and buying xiaomi phones, checking deals on Ozb, etc.

          Or not! :-)

        •  

          @kale chips suck: "Or not! :-)" —> This, I think! You make it sound so simple! :)

    • +2 votes

      Of course, the crazy thing here is that if the Hospital IT/Voice Staff knew what they were doing, they would have all outgoing lines show "XYZ Hospital" or even "XYZ Hospital-ER" or XYZ Hospital - Oncology, as the caller ID. It's not rocket science.

      •  

        Good point. But sadly, it seems the IT departments of hospitals (at least those I have encountered in recent times), seem stuck in the 1960's.

        Examples: Tiny 14" CRT TVs mounted about 8 metres from beds. And then patients have to pay for them! You know, old people, people with eyesight issues… It is as if TVs are some kind of special blessing bestowed by a deity.

        No WiFi. At a huge city hospital. Seriously? It's 2018. If a poor patient cannot see the distant (costly) TV, then at least let them surf the net…

        [Oh, circumventing the boring argument that "sensitive hospital equipment may be interfered with by phone or WiFi signals"… really? This is like the aircraft instrument argument. If the heart monitor hooked up to me can be influenced by someone's iPad or mobile phone, I think it's time to find another heart monitor vendor. Likewise, if a 787 can fall out of the sky because Johnny in 56C is playing with his Nintendo…]

        Remotes, light controls, assistance calling devices, bed adjusting devices… appear as if they came from the set of I Love Lucy.

        I am guessing this is all likely more a symptom of lack of funding for IT (when the money is 'better' spent on, like, saving people's lives).

        • +3 votes

          Amen, and don't get me started - I consulted to a state Health department a while back - I asked the network people did they support ISO 11073 on the network -= they asked "why". I said - each and every monitor, iv management unit etc, has a connector on the back and "talks" that protocol. So rather than having nurses ignoring devices beeping at a patient's bedside, they could ignore them at the nurses station.

          But then, this was the same health org that wanted to update all of their servers but didn't know what they had. I suggested pulling every invoice from IBM, DELL, HP ETC FOR THE LAST FEW YEARS, but their ERP wasn't that smart. So I coded up an SNMP Spider to crawl their network , asking everything that responded, what it was. THere ended up being about 30% more servers than they thought they had, many of which were doing nothing,.

          THen there was a private childrens hospital, that I was asked to do the network design for - I suggested putting in Video on Demand, so that kids could be streamed educational material so they didn't fall behind on education. Interviewer loved the idea, hospital thought it was "too hard".

        •  

          @MisterQ:

          I work at state run health facility as a RN and the documentation system is a mess. The state government has bought the documentation software called manad for our facility a while ago, however its not being used because of the luddites in management refuses to change. Therefore we use about 192 hundred fragile folders to store clinical documentation and use facsimile to send messages to pharmacists, allied health or VMOs.

          So who gets blame when something is forgotten or missed. The nursing staff, we have to write a reflection what we went wrong, etc. Because we signed a check list to check other checklists are checked and accounted for.

  • +2 votes

    what you are saying about missing calls from banks, council etc is true. if you are worried then set up voice mail.

  • +1 vote

    My work gives us shifts through a no caller ID number so I have no choice unfortunately :(
    Pretty sure it's intentional

  • +3 votes

    I definitely don't pickup if there is no number or ID, its never ever anyone good. But I have voice mail on, so if its something important they'll always leave a message, which actually gives me time to think through answers or figure out whats coming up haha.

    • +1 vote

      I think this is the first time I'll be the one you say this: "Username checks out!"

      When you get calls relating to "other people's problems" it's very handy to get more information. As long as you're not surrounded by criminals…

  • +5 votes

    Well, all my outgoing calls have no number.
    As a teacher, most of my outgoing calls from school (with number listed) go unanswered as it is office hours, and parents tell you they can't talk now. Most calls after office hours from my mobile (no number listed) also go unanswered.

    I write the following on my student's record: "Attempted contact with parent during school hours and after school hours. Not contactable".
    (And when parents ask why they were not notified about this and that incident relating to their child, I just pull up the records.)

    So, that's one reason to answer "no number" calls.

    • +5 votes

      Most calls after office hours from my mobile (no number listed) also go unanswered

      So, leave a message on voicemail (often not retrieved because of charges) or send a text.

      If people hide their number, they must have something to hide. In the case of teachers, there is good reason for this but don't expect an answer in most cases. Send a text. That gets most people's attention - especially when they're driving.

      • +1 vote

        That's if they have voicemail. I would say, more than half of those I call do not.
        (Interesting fact: Sometime when I leave a voicemail, I get a call back saying: "That's not my child.")

        And yes, I do email parents, and sometimes get the "email does not exist" message as well.

      •  

        "If people hide their number, they must have something to hide". What a load of crap, I and others have explained why we have private numbers. We dont all live in the city.

        • +3 votes

          What a load of crap

          I'll take that as a "I respectfully disagree with what you say"

          I and others have explained why we have private numbers

          Feel free. Go right ahead. Just don't expect many of your outgoing calls to be answered.

      •  

        If people hide their number, they must have something to hide. In the case of teachers, there is good reason for this but don't expect an answer in most cases. Send a text. That gets most people's attention - especially when they're driving.

        and get a fine if they are in VIC - The place to be fined

      •  

        Sorry, but I'm not sending a text message from my personal mobile when it's a work related call. My personal mobile number is personal and I don't want work contact using it.

        My workplace doesn't send Caller IDs. We used to, but people would ring back saying "I had a missed call, but I don't know who it's from". When the office has 20-30 staff, it's impossible to find out who rang that person & it was taking up too much staff time fielding these calls. If you have a voicemail, we'll leave a message. If you don't have a voicemail, we'll ring back once more. (And fully document everything.)

  • +2 votes

    I sometimes like talking rubbish with the random gronks that ring up selling me crap like life insurance and electricity. I'll keep them going for ages, and then hang up. I only do this to the serial offenders

  • +1 vote

    I totally ignore the landline when it rings. People we care about call our mobiles. We call them back on the landline at no cost.

    • +4 votes

      i think the last time i had a landline was around 2000 and it had been unplugged except for ADSL for a few years before that.

      not sure why anyone would give the ATO, RTA, police etc their phone number. they can send me a letter. i've been in the same residence for 25 years and i'm not sure even, that any of my utilities have my phone number. i made the mistake of communicating via email at one point and they immediately switched my bill from snail mail.

  • +8 votes

    I always answer these type of calls otherwise how would I know that it is a helpful Telstra technician alerting me to the fact I have multiple virus' on my PC??

  • +3 votes

    I was trying to call a candidate for line up an interview for a job he’d applied for. I was calling from a private number. I emailed him to let him know his phone was going straight to voicemail - he got his friends to call his phone and wrote back that I must be calling his number wrong. He’d forgot that he’d turned the auto blocking feature on.

    • -2 votes

      I guess it's a bad idea to call people from a private number. Thanks

      • -2 votes

        Your pet goes missing. A busy Samaritan tries to call the phone number on the pet's collar. No answer. Samaritan leaves, as they were busy. Pet attempts to cross the road. Pet doesn't make it to the other side.

        I guess it was a bad idea to not answer the phone. Thanks.

  • +4 votes

    When I'm bored I answer them as invariably it's an Indian scammer calling about Solar Panels or a virus on my computer or telling me that I've won a trip in a mythical contest and I'll play with them for a while, my record is 25 minutes.

    While they are talking to me they aren't conning some more gullible person into downloading a virus or giving out their credit card number and having their bank account cleaned out.

  • +2 votes

    Yes. I was dealing with NSW Fair Trading and they call you from a hidden ID number. Also been applying for jobs and wouldn't want to miss out on an opportunity just by not answering. I always ask who they are before confirming who I am.

  • +3 votes

    I have a PABX call answering system that puts callers in a a never ending loop if they sellect "Press 4 if you wish to speak to our buyers depanrtment" (there is no such dept) LOL …. works a treat! I am able to log the mount of time that loop is used and its substantial number of calls and average time online in the loop is 3mins (the loop is 2.5mins long).

  • +1 vote

    Every employer I ever had had private number decoded into their switchboard / government and non-government.

    I have noticed that our public hospitals here in Brisbane - if they are ringing you to make an appointment, a number comes up. When hospital doctors were calling re my elderly father, a mobile number came up.

    This is a recent change. A call from other numbers within the same hospitals do not come up or the switchboard number comes up.

    We have a business attached to the phone and some no are genuine customers. We do not answer them out if business hours though.

  • +2 votes

    Since being generous to several charity organisations last Christmas I have been flooded with calls pretty much on a daily basis. This has really been getting me down having to answer and refuse, although I do reject 99% of them now. Would far rather receive an email here and there, I can spam away at my leisure, than these pestering calls. I do have my own medical, dental and living expenses to try to keep up with too you know people!

    Whilst I appreciate good causes (and job creation), I am not wealthy and I do paying a few regulars. Am reluctant to not answer the no caller id ones too, but some of these do arise from personal medical sources at times, so feel obliged to.

  1. lbsyc on 14/04/2018 - 13:33
  2. vinni9284 on 14/04/2018 - 13:19
  3. Clear on 14/04/2018 - 13:31
  4. Ristretto on 14/04/2018 - 14:52
  5. Godric on 14/04/2018 - 13:19
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