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12 Free Computer Programming eBooks @ Amazon AU/US

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Today's free ebook category is computer programming. Hopefully something that can help you. All ebooks were free at the time of posting.

Programming: HTML: Programming Guide: Computer Programming: LEARN IN A DAY! (PHP, Java, Web Design, Computer Programming, SQL, HTML, PHP) - US , AU

How To Make Your Own Video Game: Quick Start Guide (How To eBooks Book 41) - US,AU

C Programming: Language: A Step by Step Beginner's Guide to Learn C Programming in 7 Days - US, AU

Ruby For Beginners: Your Guide To Easily Learn Ruby Programming in 7 days - US, AU

jQuery For Beginners: Your Guide To Easily Learn jQuery Programming in 7 days - US, AU

Python 3 Programming: A Beginner Crash Course Guide to Learn Python 3 in 1 Week - US, AU

Java: Code Your Way to Corporate - A Beginners Guide to Learn the Latest Edition of Java Programming and Coding (java, java programming, java for dummies, … java tutorial, java book, java guide) - US, AU

JavaScript: Program a Dynamic, User-Responsive Website - A Crash Course to Learn JavaScript Programming and HTML the Easy Way (javascript, javascript the … programming, javascript for beginners) - US, AU

Bash Command Line Pro Tips - US, AU

Excel VBA: Tips and Tricks to Learn and Understand Excel VBA for Business Analysis - US, AU

PHP – HTML for a multilevel menu (IT Easy Solutions Programming & Office Automation Book 0) - US, AU

Python3 101 MCQ - Multiple Choice Questions Answers for Jobs, Tests and Quizzes: Python3 Programming QA (Python 3 Beginners Guide) - US, AU

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closed Comments

    • +5 votes

      isn't programmin in demand? did u go uni?

        • +16 votes

          Most outsourced work is shit quality. Local programmers are in demand. Many local jobs even include fixing systems that were built by outsourced work because they are totally unmaintainable, poor performing or not secure.

        • +4 votes

          Its popular to outsource code made by mid tier programmers in India then to have local experienced programmers fix it to a usable state.
          Programming jobs are in demand and will always be in demand lowest wage wins, but clients are looking for quality.

        • +6 votes

          @no not me: >Local programmers are in demand

          So why is the unemployment rate amongst Computer Science graduates so high then?

        •  

          @Diji1: yeah exactly curious as well, also where did you get this figure from?

        • +1 vote

          @Diji1:

          I am not sure either.Maybe lack of effort in job hunting.

          But there are bucketloads of Jobs for Computer Science/Software Engineering. I myself have 2 offers in hand and am in the process of getting a third one.

          I would easily recommend Computer Science/Engineering of any Year 12. Best course and profession ever. My course has served me well.

        • +1 vote

          @Diji1: Poor skills sets, badly written resume, terrible communication and presentation skills. A lack of common sense is also far too common. Being a good programmer is very tough requiring a combination of skills and the ability to self manage and adapt to changing situations.

          There isnt much of a market for badly written code and with many programmers unable to produce anythng useful outside of their favourite IDE there isnt much hope for optimisation.

          If you want to be a programmer and you are not brilliant be prepared to have to pick up other work while you hone your skils.

        • +3 votes

          @fedupwithjunk: I've been programming professionally for just over 20 years now and while I'm certainly competent I'd hardly call myself brilliant. The key thing I've found, as you touched on in your comment, is the communication skills. You cannot overestimate the importance of being able to communicate effectively with your customers. You need to be able to understand their requirements (and ask the right questions because often, when you start probing, you find out that they don't actually understand their own requirements or the real problems sitting behind what they think are their requirements), and you need to be able to communicate technical concepts in a way that non-technical people understand. Obviously you then need a fairly solid base of technical skills to actually implement the solution, but solid technical skills plus good communication skills will take you just as far as genius level technical skills plus sh** communication skills. That's also where a lot of the outsourced stuff falls in a heap - there's just really poor communication, resulting in misunderstood requirements.

          The other key thing you also mention is being adaptable, not just stuck in a single IDE or a single language. That's where I found a degree helpful, because if gave me the foundation of knowledge about programming, irrespective of what actual language / environment you're doing it in. At uni they taught us mostly in Ada, and we wrote our code in a plain old text editor then ran it through a command-line compiler. I haven't looked at Ada since (and, mercifully, the tools have been better!), but the basic concepts I learned have helped me through my career, initially doing VB4/5/6, then onto .NET (C#), javascript etc. With the occasional curveball thrown at me along the way (stuff like Delphi and even a bit of ladder logic for PLC's).

        •  

          @no not me: Yep, all the code we outsource is abolsute shit and we have to rewrite 99% of it.

        •  

          @Diji1:

          Everyone wants programmers with 3+ years of experience. Once you get to that level, you’re set.

          Specialise in something in demand, like neural networks, and you’re in an even better position.

          Oh, and make sure you present well. Too many programmers make no effort in appearance or developing their communication skills, which means they fail as soon as they hit a face-to-face interview.

        •  

          @AngusD: After 45 years in commercial IT I can support your point of view completely. Communication is the most important skill of a developer and programmer.
          All the best in the future.

        •  

          @no not me:
          That is true, but I've found a distinct lack of nouse in IT management in Brisbane, dumping endless money into failing projects whilst not giving competent people jobs.

      • +3 votes

        Programming is a pretty broad area: you need skills in the right area (language (s), etc.) of demand.

        •  

          It used to be that skills were transferable - if I've learned a dozen other languages I think I'll be alright with what you're using. But then you'd actually have to interview me rather than let HR, or probably a program, scan my resume for keywords to decide whether I'm competent.

    •  

      Did you go to uni or were you self taught?
      From what iv'e been told self taught programming is a thing, however you have to put in a pretty incredible amount of hours as they look at universities for graduate/entry jobs so you essentially have to start as an mid tier programmer if you are self taught?

      •  

        from what i know many who don't go uni, find it harder to get jobs

        •  

          Most larger places won’t hire you at all without qualifications recognised by Engineers Australia.

          Engineering is like being a doctor or lawyer. If you’re not qualified, you shouldn’t be practicing.

        •  

          yes, and no.

          there are some great schools like General Assemblies that have terrific success in placing students after graduating. I know some of them.
          There are some other schools which are a bit of a sham, such as Coderfactory Academy which don't take time to really give people a proper education and post-graduate support, so because of this, many find it hard to gain employment.

        •  

          @marlor:

          Engineering, yes.
          but we're talking about a totally different thing altogether - we're talking about being hired in 'programming'.

          Employers look at your portfolio/Github, interview you and then send you tests to perform. If successful, you might land the job.

        •  

          @dddddog:

          There's "programming" and there's "software engineering".

          If you're just hacking up a website, that's one thing. But if you're working on mission-critical systems for health, transport or defense, it's another. The big money is often in the latter.

    • +1 vote

      My colleague used to be a nurse then became a programmer. This is in Melbourne though.

    • +1 vote

      I have been in the industry for a while now and I can say with certainty that GOOD or even just decent programmers are in high demand right now. However, there is a massive percentage of developers out there that are complete rubbish. They clearly joined the industry because they heard there is money and have no interest in programming.

      If you are not very good right now, it is very achievable to become decent at programming as it is one of the rare jobs where you can significantly skill up in your own time.

      My biggest advice to finding a developer job is to create your own portfolio. In fact build/host your own portfolio website (without using things like Wordpress). It will be good experience, increase your web dev knowledge and at the same time it is also part of your portfolio.

      • +1 vote

        i'm 15, do you think i need to go to uni, also what languages do you think are important now. I don't mind doing web dev, or app dev, or anything, just like programming in general.

        •  

          Languages keep changing, you need to understand the basic, the foundation of programming, like data structure, algorithm, then push yourself to open source projects, let's try Free Code Camp.

        • +6 votes

          You no longer need to have a degree to get a good job or even a great job in tech. Do I recommend going to university? Definitely. University life a great experience that I think everyone should try if they have the opportunity. I also highly recommend proactively joining clubs or events that you might find interesting. I went to UNSW and they had an awesome robotics group and there is also a security/hacker group that competes with other universities. These are experience opportunities that you will never really have outside university.

          A common question I always get asked is, "Do I learn anything useful in a Computer Science degree that I can't get from a coding boot camp or self learning?" Of course you do! Will you use more than 50% of the thing you learn at work? No. That is not the point of university though. University is to make you slightly more well rounded, better foundation and the biggest advantage is that you will have a choice in finding something that you really enjoy and aim for in the future. You would have experienced web development, computer networking, security, AI, machine learning, assembly programming and even write your own compiler.

          If all you want is to make money then I would skip university, do a boot camp for 6 month and get a job. Boot camps are great at getting you prepared to find a job but you will miss out one some fundamentals like algorithms and if you decide you don't like the specific field your boot camp is aimed for then you don't really have other choice or get a taste of anything else.

          As for just using self study, it takes a great amount of self control and willpower. I personally find it really boring to read coding books but they can be extremely useful. It is also a lot less structured to teach yourself because you don't know what you don't know and hence it's hard to know what the next step is at times.

          On a side note, most if not all companies like people who have at least a Bachelors degree in CS. (although I strongly disagree with this)

          TL:DR I strongly recommend going to university but you do not need to go to university to get a great job in tech.

        •  

          @thispasito:

          You no longer need to have a degree to get a good job or even a great job in tech.

          I'd say you never used to need a degree, but now for most mid/large/Govt jobs it's part of the Key Selection Criteria, for the only reason that it cuts down the number of applicants. If you're contracting through an agency, then it's just experience.

        •  

          @supabrudda:

          yes, but that is almost strictly government.

          most commercial enterprises do not stipulate a university degree. Just that you have the knowledge.

          that said, university teaches you a lot and might give you a bigger bump up in the resume queue, but isn't necessary.
          mostly, employers will look for experience and evidence of skill.

        •  

          @dddddog: most commercial enterprises do not stipulate a university degree. Just that you have the knowledge.

          They also require you to have 3+ or 5+ years of professional experience. It is very difficult to get a first job without a degree unless you spend ten years working your way up from level 1 helpdesk.

    • +4 votes

      I just had an interview today, have to say it is challenging and interesting. I highly recommend you join some open source projects, or upload your own project to Github or Bitbucket, or write some technical articles. The employers nowadays go through these details first and after that decide to proceed further. Reading some books and proving your skills on some open source project are 2 different things, I believe the later will give you more chance to beat the market.

      •  

        do employers give a **** if you want to uni or not?

        • +3 votes

          I self study, although I have CS degree but it was 11 years ago. I have 2 friends, one never finished degree, and one never attend Uni, both have written technical blogs to push themselves and to prove employers they have skills. Both are sponsored to relocate to Europe now.

          So, push you to the limit with open source projects.

        • +3 votes

          @haisergeant: Every graduate I have employed says they learn more in 4 months on the job than they did during a 4 year degree!

          That said, without a really good portfolio the degree certificate is often needed to open a few doors.

    • +1 vote

      Are you kidding? I get practically spammed by recruiters on linkedin doing mobile dev. Demand is so high now I was able to get in after 6 months of self-study. Which could really be done in 3 months if you aren't doing anything else.

    •  

      I'm currently studying bachelor of IT at QUT but changing into Bachelor of Paramedicine haha.

    •  

      which language do you programming

  •  

    Tried three Australian links and says —> This title is not currently available for purchase

    •  

      I just went through all the AU links and all are fine — make sure you're selecting the Kindle version of the product, as your own Amazon settings or browsing history may sometimes interfere with product pages to direct to the paperback versions. The links provided should go straight to the Kindle options, but still, that's the first troubleshooting step.

  •  

    How To Make Your Own Video Game: Quick Start Guide (How To eBooks Book 41) - US is pointing to AU version

    should be:
    https://www.amazon.com/How-Make-Your-Video-Game-ebook/dp/B00...

  • +1 vote

    Thanks OP, downloaded python and java, gonna try it some time after my trials.

  • +12 votes

    Most of this is affiliate marketing crap, low quality content, 50-60 pages books. Great way to ruin someone's interest.

  • +3 votes

    Thanks OP. Grabbed the Excel VBA book, for something different: appreciate you taking the time to post.

  • +1 vote

    I got the C and Bash Command Lines book, though I don't expect much from these books.

  • +3 votes

    The reviews on the C book are awful

  • +2 votes

    Read the reviews first. They're not pretty for the ones I checked. A few are definitely suspect. There's no harm in downloading, but if you plan to set aside time to do some reading with these books, read the reviews first.

  • +1 vote

    55 pages, 128 pages , these aren’t programming books, i think it’s people wanting to be able to say they have published something on their resume ….. wonder how many paid copiers they sold …..

  • +1 vote

    These books are good to learn the basics and theory. But the best way is to learn is to start coding. You can find heaps of samples from GitHub and help from StackOverflow. I’ve been in the industry for more than 15 years already. There are plenty of jobs if you have the right skills. Learn Angular/React/Mobile and create a mini project in GutHub that you can you show in your CV. Being active in SO will also help.

  • +1 vote

    Learning how to code from books is crap. Think of a program or app you truly like to create, split it up to stages then Google and work on it. This is whats going into your CV, problem solving is what matters to employer.

    2nd part is learning how to communicate like a normal human being.

    •  

      Books can really be nice starting points. Sure, they get out of date, but if you get a current one, they can give you a broad grounding and introduce you to important language features you might overlook if you just jump in and start coding.

      Particularly for experienced coders. There’s a habit when learning a new language to bend the new language to fit your existing way of doing things, even if that’s not particularly efficient. A good book can help you break those habits and help you think about coding in a new way.

      That said, these are not good books.

  • +6 votes

    These are pretty much all a waste of time.

    Clearly ghostwritten by someone on e-lancer or similar who has stilted English and who pads out the work with random factoids in no particular order.

    “C Programming is one of the most useful and easy-to-use computer programming languages. The person who came up with this C Programming goes by the name of Dennis M. Ritchie.”

    Then a list of the world’s top 10 supercomputers because, well they run Linux, which is written in C.

    “When it comes to the Windows phone, the android and also the iOS their kennels are in the C language” (the book says “kennels”)

    By the end of the sample, there has been literally nothing relevant to actually writing a single line of C.

    Early in Chapter 2, we are told “It is a good idea to start by downloading and installing the compiler”

    Dunno who upvotes these deals..

  •  

    Thanks OP, have been self learning for a few months now, good find. :)

  • +2 votes

    As others have mentioned, these books are just straight up bad. Better to buy a decent quality book or just go to your local library and borrow one. These crappy free books won't help you really understand programming or give you a solid foundation for building on.

    • +2 votes

      Honestly, any programming book which says "learn x in y days", "crash course in", "learn instantly" on programming will only help you "feel" like you learned something, when in reality you've sort of rote memorized how to do some specific task. I encourage everyone to look at the reviews on on these books before actually trying to learn from them, otherwise you're probably wasting your time.

  • +3 votes

    My son graduated in Feb. of this year w/a CS/computer systems engineering dual-degree. Prior to his graduating, I advised him to hit up seek.com.au offerings and see which languages were most in demand and to start dabbling now.

    He took the first job offer (after applying to three places). Funnily, they sent him a "test" which required knowledge of C# — which he'd not had much experience with. He sat down and produced the best outcome of 50 applicants.

    He loves the small group he's working with and can (if he wanted) work from home every day— but he does go up to Perth at least one day per week to have that face-to-face connection with his team.

    Just to say, yes, there are plenty of jobs out there and you will be expected to think outside the box for most of them.

    Good luck everyone!

  • +2 votes

    Going by the reviews on Amazon.com, they appear to be mostly fake books. If you really want something for nothing, there are myriad websites with free tutorials and resources for learning programming. Give this one a miss.

  •  

    I got Bash in April apparently :)

    PHP no longer free

  •  

    Personally I prefer Zed Shaws books.

    Mostly use C / Fortran / Bash / Python and pearl in my day job as an HPC engineer

  •  

    The HTML book, the make your own video game book, the python book and the ruby book are not free!!!!!!!!!!

    Don't accidentally click on 1-click ordering! I almost bought the python book but luckily I had already 'bought' it before

  •  

    The VBA book is also not free. I accidentally paid $4 for it >:-( (Just saw in my email). And I didn't even need it, I have lots of VBA books. Sigh. Guess I should be more observant.

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