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Xiaomi Power Bank 3 Pro 20000mAh USB-C $49.99 Delivered @ Gearbite eBay

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PELICAN

The ever-popular Xiaomi Power Bank 3 Pro 20000mAh USB-C Two-way 45W QC3.0 PD Fast Charge is on sale again through eBay's EOFY sale. As far as I know this is safe to travel with due to battery capacity/wH, but don't take my word for it! Item will show $58.81 and come down to $49.99 with the code PELICAN. What are you waiting for? Get around it you pelican!

Original 15% off 34 Sellers on eBay Deal Post

ABN 60 615 962 500

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  •  

    You should be fine on the plane . I’ve taken my 26800mah RAVPower to many countries without problems . In fact i have had 3 power banks in my back pack in one go with issues . Just don’t check them in and carry on .

    • -1 vote

      CASA says > 20,000mAh 5v batteries require 'approval from your airline before flying'. Doesn't mean you will be stopped, but you may be (in your case). This one should be ok as it's right on the limit.

      https://www.casa.gov.au/standard-page/travelling-safely-batt...

      • +5 votes

        These batteries have a nominal voltage of 3.7 V. So the 100 Wh limit means you're good up to 27 Ah at 3.7 V. That's why you see 26800 mAh batteries.

      • -1 vote

        CASA says nothing about Ah or voltage because both are irrelevant.
        The closest they come is further down the page you link where they demo a crude (but usual acceptable) V * A * Wh.

    • +1 vote

      if all of you prefer express post and cheap priced,would recommended this.

    •  

      A rough calculation has you right on the knife edge of the 100Wh allowable limit.
      That fact that 99% of power-bank ratings are bullshit anyway would suggest you're safe.
      What's important is that the battery has it's capacity labeled on it.

      In the context of power-banks Ignore anyone or anything that talks about 5v, Ah or mAh.
      Power-banks contain nominally 3.7 volt lithium ion cell(s) and use a DC-DC boost converter to provide a typically 5.1v regulated output.

      Capacity is measured in watt hours in the real world (not the power bank world) and that is what the airlines need to know to assess the risk.

      See this example…
      https://imgur.com/y9kQqn6
      ::edit:: - Just realized they put the 5.1v equivalent Ah rating on that power bank, pictured bottom left.

      And to be crystal clear, Ah or mAh do not matter.
      A 20Ah 3.7v battery has a very different amount of power stored than a 20Ah 370v battery.

      Aside, some PD type power banks might nominate to start connecting their internal cells in series instead of parallel, the possibility of one day having a 3.33Ah power bank could be very real and would have the same amount of power as a 20Ah powerbank.
      People should not let marketing departments educate them.

      •  

        Would be great if the people that negged posts had the guts to say why.

  • +1 vote

    Mine went through BNE and DRW domestic security no problem last week. I put it in the tray for scanning next to the Mix 2S. Sigh, just pulled the trigger on the Vacuum, I have a problem…

  •  

    Can it charge Lenovo thinkpad e595?

    •  

      Yes, it will charge fine as it is 45W output.

      •  

        Will any of the 10,000 amp unit charge a e485/495 etc.?

        You need the pro version?

        • +1 vote

          As long as the power bank outputs at least 45 watts and supports USB-PD, its enough to charge any lenovo. The 10000 variant only has 18 watts, which isn't enough.

          If you want to charge a e485 etc, the powerbank in this post is the best for the price right now. The Kogan ones arent bad, but the ones that can charge laptops are not at a good price/out of stock.

          •  

            @Fishdog: My Lenovo needs 65W to charge

            •  

              @veridianfive: Take this with a grain of salt, but many devices that support PD charging can take power form a range of power around their nominal.
              Also notebooks that ship with a 65W 'capable' charger rarely ever use the full capability of the charger.

              My Lenovo for example came with a 65W charger but typically charges at around 30-40 watts.

              There will however usually be a cutoff point where the input power is inadequate (<20W for example only)

              More important is what PD capability the device has.
              Most Lenovos will be looking for a PD device capable of delivering 20v

              I hope to do some testing on this soon, but do not yet have a PD capable notebook.
              There are some adapters that contain circuitry to trigger certain PD voltages, i have on order a few that are supposed to trigger 20v, I'll be testing these on the bench for quality and then connecting to my Thinkpad that has the rectangle connector prior to the type C port.

              If all goes well I'll probably grab a few of these devices (~ $5 ea) to deliver power to various other portable devices.

  • +1 vote

    Does this fully charge Surface Pro 6?

    •  

      Wanting to know this too. Need one for a upcoming cruise.

    •  

      Note charging would be slower as no 15v

    •  

      Should easily do on paper.

  •  

    i've been traveling with this the past 3 months. never had issue with domestic and international flights. Note that you must carry on

    •  

      The IATA standards for batteries are typically unlimited (reasonable for personal use) up to 99WH, up to two batteries 99-160Wh, special approval or no allowance for batteries over 160Wh. These I believe are 74Wh so should be no issue for most airlines.

      However, it's worth noting that most airlines subscribe to the IATA standards which require the batteries to be of a type that meets the requirements of the UN Manual of Tests and Criteria, Part III, subsection 38.3. If you can't produce a certificate of compliance (MSDS or battery datasheet from manufacturer proving the battery passes these tests some airlines (the really anal ones) may not let you bring the battery on board). They usually don't care with small power banks but start stressing about the large drone or video camera batteries (159.9Wh). That said most big companies like DJI, Xaomi etc. will send you a copy of the certificates if you email them or alternatively you can find them online.

  •  

    Stupid question would I need this to charge my p30 pro since it have usb c connector.

  • +1 vote

    Bought one.

  •  

    What’s a good USB-C charger to go with this and is there a charging cable that comes with this?

    • +1 vote

      If you can find this one it does 45W out.

      I'm currently using this one which has "only" 30W out.

      •  

        Thank you. USB-C to Lightning cable would be the bigger cost now haha

  •  

    Is this the biggest/best model powerbank xiaomi makes?

  • -1 vote

    This is a bit cheaper. Wondering if it's too cheap?
    https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/Xiaomi-Power-Bank-3-Pro-20000mAh...

    •  

      Showing as $69.95 for me

      •  

        $24.95?

        • +1 vote

          Price changes based on the product you select.

          •  

            @Xishnik: Thx.

            A bit rough, this is the add I clicked onto get to their site: Xiaomi Power Bank 3 Pro 20000mAh USB-C Two-…

            AU $24.95

            Free Postage

            It appears above Gearbite page on the link the OP posted.

  •  

    Would this quick charge a Pixel 2xl / Pixel 3?

  • +1 vote

    The only places I have seen issues at airports with powerbanks is in China and Thailand.

    After x-ray they took out the powerbanks and batteries examining the ratings.

    They allow up to 20000mAH x 5V or < 100wH each, without special permissions. You can carry over that, but airline permission is needed.

    The rating must be clearly marked on the powerbank. If a generic powerbank has no rating marked on it, they will confiscate it.

    In China for spare batteries they also want the exposed terminals covered, using either tape over the terminals or put each battery in a separate plastic bag to isolate them.

  • +1 vote

    Very slightly cheaper ($49.30) here

  •  

    Besides the 15000 vs 20000mah capacity - what is the difference between this and the Xiaomi ZMI 15000mAh 45W PD USB-C Power Bank ?