expired Huawei Mate 20 128GB $599 C&C /+ Delivery @ JB Hi-Fi

3170

James Brayshaw (noted purveyor of Hi-Fi equipment) has marked down the Mate 20 from $899 to $599, and the 5% off code brings it to $569.05 (TODAY ONLY). (EXPIRED)

I, for one, welcome our new Chinese overlords and am happy to share my most personal data with them. Great phone with a lit camera and dank battery life (dabs).

Original Coupon Deal

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Comments

  • +16 votes

    I got one from amazon last time on sale. Can vouch its an awsome phone, my wife loves the camera and battery lasts all day with very heavy use.

    • +3 votes

      The battery will last even longer once all the google play apps stop working.

      • +7 votes

        The ban is for sys updates not for APPs, and it has been removed at least for now as Trump's threat does not hurt. A barking dog never bites.

        • -1 vote

          "A barking dog never bites"
          Don't test that theory, it's wrong.

          But your point is correct. Judging by the current situation, I expect full normal Android support to be re-available soon.

        •  

          I was just joking, confirmed stock level on JB around sydney dropping like flies compared to this morning. By tomorrow all will be sold out.

          Those missing out might still be able to get on the prime day, but not expecting huge drop in prices, amazon still got to make some profit, this ain't charity matey.

          • +1 vote

            @blaccdong: Amazon is willing to make razor thin margins. Expansion and market share is the name of the game for them, not profits. They're taking a long term view. Once they kill off all the mom and grop shops, swallow up some of the bigger guys, then they have total domination and can start working on profits.

    •  

      just smashed the screen of my mate 20 pro and they wanna $399 to replace one from their authorised repairer……bit of pain for these screens

      • +1 vote

        If you buy your phone with an AMEX essential card you get free smart phone screen insurance. If the screen breaks, AMEX pays for it with a 10% excess, so that would be $40 for you.

  •  

    which is better? this or the S10e? in terms of battery life, taking photos and filming video

    • +15 votes

      In those three categories, this phone.

    • +7 votes

      As a matter of fact, mate 20 triple cams have no OIS on all of them.

      https://www.gsmarena.com/huawei_mate_20-review-1846p6.php

      • +4 votes

        The review i just watched comparing the mate 20 and mate 20 pro, said the tele photo (zoom) camera has OIS. The other cameras dont have OIS though.

    • +1 vote

      s10e

      Mate 20 is last gen bro

    • +7 votes

      s10e is better, although i'm using P20 pro. Rear cameras are good, but the front cam is just for girls haha, it just smooth your skin even when u turn off every beauty mode, your face will look very washed out. Battery on Huawei is good tho, last 1.5 days for me. The s10e would last a bit more than that.

      •  

        Yeah all Huawei have crap front cameras, no autofocus etc. Rear cameras are great though.

        By the way EMUI 9.1 is being released this month and it's supposed to improve pretty much everything.

        • +1 vote

          Yeah, i hope so. After last update, all notifications have sound even when i put the phone on vibrate mode. It was so annoying, I tried clearing cache but didn't help. Then I tried turn off the media sound, and the phone was in silent mode lol. Now I have to turn the media sounds when I dont watch videos and listen to musics on the phone. I hope it get fixed in the next update.

  • +65 votes

    I, for one, welcome our new Chinese overlords and am happy to share my most personal data with them

    I like how every time the talk goes to Huawei people either joke or are serious about them stealing data.
    Meanwhile, Google and Apple get away with much worse but people somehow take that for granted.

    i guess propaganda really works for most of the people.

    • +22 votes

      I grew up in a communist country, not much different from China and I can tell you I would rather have my personal data with Google/Apple than any communist government

      • -4 votes

        I would rather have my personal data with Google/Apple than any communist government

        This sentence is wrong on so many levels.

        1) I want noone to have my data.
        2) Why do people think that our data matter to the Chinese government? I mean, Chinese people's data in China yes, but why would they want YOUR data? HINT: They dont.
        3) Even if they did gather data from all huawei/Xiaomi/Oneplus owners, what would they do with them? You people dont really understand that THEY DONT SPEAK ENGLISH, imagine having to filter 500.000.000 people's data.

        • -37 votes

          We need ASIO to monitor all our data to make Australia safe. We don't want another Man Monis or Curtis Cheng killer roaming around here.

          Regardless whether you agree or not, they already doing it, for our own protection.

        • -3 votes
          1. Absolutely agree with you. My point is the lesser of the evils is the better
          2. Unfortunately they do. The Marriott hack was an example. They publicly acknowledged they do not know what to do with the data yet but it is worth collecting the data with the intention of putting them to use at a later stage
          3. You may need to take another look at their talent pool, especially the skilled workforce. Some of the most brilliant researchers in the world at the moment on big data and data mining are Chinese. And English is pretty much a must have for many people, at least in the big cities
        • +3 votes

          1) I want noone to have my data.

          Well then you have next to no smart phone options available to you. All the popular ones are either Chinese owned, or American owned, or neither but have American tech inside of it.

          2) Why do people think that our data matter to the Chinese government? I mean, Chinese people's data in China yes, but why would they want YOUR data? HINT: They dont.

          How about people just don't want China, or America, to have access to that kind of data? Clearly you've been living under a rock, because China have been prosecuting "dissidents" and protesters. I don't want China to have access to my personal data, or what I say because they're guaranteed to abuse it. America already do this to their own citizens, China will be even worse because they aren't a democracy and have no oversight into how they operate.
          If you missed the point, China doesn't want YOUR data in particular. They want access to EVERYONES data, just like how they're forcibly installing spyware on every Uyghurs' smartphone which enters the region.

          3) Even if they did gather data from all huawei/Xiaomi/Oneplus owners, what would they do with them? You people dont really understand that THEY DONT SPEAK ENGLISH, imagine having to filter 500.000.000 people's data.

          Why are you so ignorant as to use language as point of contention? Did you know Chinese people can speak English? Did you know people can be bi-lingual? Did you even know that was a word? Your entire comment reeks of naivety

          You cannot escape from your personal data being abused in the digital age, but you can make the choice of what liberties you forfeit in exchange for convenience and services. Ultimately, it is a risk you take when you open up your personal life to the Chinese government and that is your own prerogative, as it is for many others.
          At least in Democratic America, there are systems and checks in place to limit the abuse of power.
          China on the other hand, have nothing stopping that except for a dictator who rules over the PRC with an iron fist.

          • +1 vote

            @Forleix: Edit: sorry not directed at Forliex in particular. Just adding to the conversation

            People may not care about the data or may not care enough. The real problem will be when ai evolves enough and it will have all this data, that the data can be misused and put out of context for ill intent.

            Never mind that your data could be used to create a fake identity for criminals where they take out loans and you’re left dealing with the debt or criminal investigation. It’s a lot of unesscesary stress that could be avoided by protecting your data

          • -1 vote

            @Forleix: You still didnt answer my question.

            Do you think YOUR data has value for the Chinese government?
            HINT: No, they dont have ANY value.

            • +2 votes

              @nikoris: Your data, our data, everyone’s data, has value, especially to an authoritarian regime. Potentially any of us may one day become an enemy or target of said regimes, possibly simply from a public or social media statement. Then, for example, personal photos or videos may be ‘photoshopped’ into blackmail or propaganda material. Have you seen the fake Obama and Zuckerberg videos? Whether the value of our data justifies the cost of collecting, collating and storing it is the real question.

          • +2 votes

            @Forleix:

            How about people just don't want China, or America, to have access to that kind of data? Clearly you've been living under a rock, because China have been prosecuting "dissidents" and protesters.

            What he means is, he lives in a country where China has no jurisdiction to do to him what they do to their citizens, so it's a non-issue.

            Why are you so ignorant as to use language as point of contention? Did you know Chinese people can speak English? Did you know people can be bi-lingual? Did you even know that was a word? Your entire comment reeks of naivety

            While this is true, Xi Jin Ping the president does not speak english, nor does the vice premier, the foreign affairs minister, or any diplomat or high level official in that government. They are only ever seen speaking Mandarin and through interpreters despite it being a highly important language to know for high level officials. They never even bothered to make the effort. So if even top brass doesn't speak the language, it's not even worth assuming that the general populace does. Some will, but China will be more concerned with what their own citizens think, not what you think. You are not their subjects.

            Ultimately, it is a risk you take when you open up your personal life to the Chinese government and that is your own prerogative, as it is for many others.
            China on the other hand, have nothing stopping that except for a dictator who rules over the PRC with an iron fist.

            China is not going to send agents to Australia to arrest you for things you have on your phone. America on the other hand is an ally of Australia and both are members of 5 eyes. There will be cooperation with the Oz govt that does not exist between China and Oz. If the US wants you, Oz will give you up, or the US will threaten to cut off intelligence sharing or something else just as punitive. If China wants you, ScoMo will tell them to go jump.

            If you live in China, that is of course a different story. But he doesn't, and I'm guessing neither does anyone here.

            Likewise if Assange was living in some embassy inside China, there would be no extradition.

            At least in Democratic America, there are systems and checks in place to limit the abuse of power.

            You've no idea what abuses of power the US have committed. They keep this stuff under a lid. Assange and Snowden have exposed their spying powers and even war crimes. That's why they want both of these men. So much for checks and balances.

            The government itself is not subjected to the same rules you are. They are very much going to act outside of the laws you are expected to abide by. If they commit crimes, you most likely are never even going to know about it unless a whistleblower exposes it. Secondly, are they going to prosecute themselves?

            Say what you want about China. I just find it laughable that you think "democracy" prevents crime or abuse of power. So many allegations have come out against Trump just this year (including rape, sexual assault with video evidence btw, and tax evasion—someone got a hold of his tax returns) but he will never get prosecuted for it because you can't prosecute a sitting president. What about after? Easy. A week before his term ends, he has Mike Pence assume the role of President and pardon Trump for any and all crimes, which includes crimes he has not even been charged with yet. He will never be able to be charged for anything. What kind of abuse of power is this "democracy" enabling here? The idea that a sitting president can't be prosecuted, and the power he has to pardon anybody for anything, including having his successor pardon him like Nixon did. He can literally get away with murder.

            Impeachment? Well the senate has to vote on that and he controls the senate. That and it still doesn't stop him from being pardoned by Pence.

            Believe it or not, he can actually pardon himself. If he does that, it will lead to impeachment and removal from office. But if he waits till he only has a few days left in office, who even cares? He pardons himself and loses his job on the last day, which he was going to lose anyway. In exchange he has immunity to any and all alleged crimes, including charges for which he has not even been accused of yet.

            •  

              @lostn:

              What he means is, he lives in a country where China has no jurisdiction to do to him what they do to their citizens, so it's a non-issue.

              This China's equivalent of PRISM. It is an issue for national security when a significant % of it's populace is under surveillance. You don't see the ramifications of having data stolen or misused in your day to day activities on the micro scale. Only in the macro scale are we affected. Meetings with China, trade agreements, negotiations; Knowing a certain member of Parliament uses a Huawei would be a significant advantage, because OpSec is a foreign concept to these people, and clearly yourself.
              I hope you can understand this concept because it applies to every other point of argument you keep making about Chinese jurisdiction over Australia.

              You've no idea what abuses of power the US have committed. They keep this stuff under a lid. Assange and Snowden have exposed their spying powers and even war crimes. That's why they want both of these men. So much for checks and balances.

              I have a very good idea of what the West have committed. As do the rest of the world. War crimes are committed by both sides, and by every nation participating in a War. The rules being followed are never black or white. ALL nation's military activities are kept secret. ALL forms of intel are kept secret. This is standard operating procedure for ALL military on the globe. I don't know what you expect the US to to do. Broadcast on Facebook or Twitter that the 1st Cavalry Division is en-route to their location? To broadcast to the terrorists that there is air-support in that region?
              The result was from bad intel, NOT an abuse of power. Separating children in concentration camps IS an abuse of power, which by the way, is very well documented.

              America has the FOIA. Do you know what China has? I thought so. "So much for checks and balances". Here we clearly see it working. Please tell me where this is working in China. One of the biggest demonstrations of checks and balances working is people demonstrating out in the open against the government's continued presence in the middle east, and so Obama drafted a plan for withdrawing military personnel.
              Do you know what happens to protesters in China? Probably not, because they vanish. Where are China's checks and balances against government abuse?

              I just find it laughable that you think "democracy" prevents crime or abuse of power.

              I'm so sorry you can't distinguish the difference between the words prevent and limit. Democracy in practise is far less corruptible than a Dictatorship. I never did say it prevents. I said:

              limit the abuse of power

              It appears the rest of your argument is derived from your inability to distinguish these two words, and you've created a strawman argument.

              For all that is said and done, there is no better example of China's dictatorship being looked down upon than the million-strong protests that is happening in Hong Kong. There is no other state in the world with closer ties to China, no other state in the world which knows China better, and which runs in a some-what democratic government, being granted far more freedom than the mainland.

              There is a lot to be said if these people, who have experienced freedom and democracy, don't want to be any part of it.

              • +1 vote

                @Forleix:

                It is an issue for national security when a significant % of it's populace is under surveillance.

                Are you a member of their populace?

                Chinese branded phones like Huawei have sold over a billion handsets. You telling me their government has the time and inclination to look at everything you do on the phone, especially the ones who don't speak chinese? It's a busy enough job just spying on 1.3 billion chinese. To add foreigners to the spying list would keep them very busy, particularly when the job has to be handed over to people familiar with the language.

                Meetings with China, trade agreements, negotiations; Knowing a certain member of Parliament uses a Huawei would be a significant advantage, because OpSec is a foreign concept to these people, and clearly yourself.

                None of this affects me because I'm not a diplomat or member of any form of government. I have no dealings with China and probably no intention of ever visiting the place. I am not considered a person of interest to them. So even if they have my data, I don't care. Even if I criticise China or its government, which I already do and most likely on platforms they have spying access to (if you think no one else is also spying on you, I'd say you're pretty naive).

                I have a very good idea of what the West have committed. As do the rest of the world.

                Well my issue is that you think democracy prevents abuses of power leading to these acts. Any country that has high influence has a way to spy on you through your personal devices. America certainly has access to it. And if it's the invasion of privacy you're afraid of, America is no more a friend of yours than China.

                America has the FOIA. Do you know what China has? I thought so. "So much for checks and balances". Here we clearly see it working. Please tell me where this is working in China. One of the biggest demonstrations of checks and balances working is people demonstrating out in the open against the government's continued presence in the middle east, and so Obama drafted a plan for withdrawing military personnel.

                I don't know what any of this has to do with me or Huawei phones. I don't protest, and I don't see what difference my choice of phone will make to your complaints. Nor do I think a Chinese person's choice of phone will affect their personal freedoms.

                I'm so sorry you can't distinguish the difference between the words prevent and limit.

                Fine but 'limit' is so ill defined a word that it has no value. If abuse of power is reduced to 99.9% of previous levels, you have limited the abuse of power. I don't think it will limit the actions of the CIA/NSA which most definitely includes the level of spying you don't want. Because you will never even learn about it, except from a whistleblower.

                It appears the rest of your argument is derived from your inability to distinguish these two words, and you've created a strawman argument.

                I'll repeat, an ill defined word has no value. I replaced it with a defined word for the purpose of a conversation. Without one, it is pointless.

                But I'll humor you. What 'limits' has democracy placed on US intelligence agencies ability to spy on you and its people? They have even set up a 5 eyes alliance specifically to get around the shitstorm of governments spying on their own people. The solution is, you let another country spy on your people for you, while you spy on theirs and you exchange information.

                Do you know what happens to protesters in China? Probably not, because they vanish. Where are China's checks and balances against government abuse?

                Wow. Making people disappear without a trace is a very impressive feat, especially if they number in the thousands of millions. How do you even hear about this? You'd think they'd be so good at it no one even knows a thing about it.

                There is no other state in the world with closer ties to China, no other state in the world which knows China better, and which runs in a some-what democratic government, being granted far more freedom than the mainland.

                There is also Taiwan and Macau. They all have autonomous government separate from the mainland.

                There is a lot to be said if these people, who have experienced freedom and democracy, don't want to be any part of it.

                Anyway, can you tie this back to how it affect's an Aussie's choice of phone? Are you afraid that by possessing a Huawei phone, in the event you land in a Chinese airport you will get arrested? Because they have somehow taken a personal interest in you, and somehow have found the time and resources to go over a billion phones worth of data with a fine toothed comb. There are quite a lot of Huawei phones sold outside of China (they didn't become #2 phone maker for no reason, and even Xiaomi sells more phones than Apple now) and I am not hearing mass reports of arrests of foreigners at airports.

                What kind of activity are you wanting to do but are afraid of doing out of fear of arrest? Are you trying to incite regime change in China?

                Any product that rattles the US enough that they will ban it and force their allies to ban it also, is going to be something of interest to me. I think it's less about what China can do with the phone, and more about what the US can't do with your phone. Namely, that Huawei or China won't allow the US a backdoor into it. If this threatens the US's ability to spy on me, I'm all for it.

                This does leave the allegation that China could spy on me instead and it's a question of whose spying is the lesser of evils. But China is not rattled by the US's spying enough to ban US products or Google/Apple's refusal to provide backdoors to the Chinese government. They have less of a tendency to stick their nose into other countries' businesses unlike the US which have interests and involvement all over the world. They have over 800 military bases abroad, drones and satellites in the air everywhere, and are actively operating in other countries far and wide on the ground or through intelligence gathering. China has no military bases or operations going on outside of their neighborhood and less need for my data.

        • +4 votes

          But Iphones, maybe Google phones are also made in China. Better don't use any phones.

        •  

          10 million Chinese speak English. 1 in 100, and even then, you only need a programmer with basic English to automate and filter that 500,000,000 person data.

          Data = money

          It can be used for anything, big 2 right now are machine learning and usage habits.

      • +2 votes

        Wrong, no other 'communist country' is 'not much different from China'.

      •  

        and which country might that be? I don't know another country that's "not much different from China".

    • +1 vote

      I like you too.

    • +16 votes

      People forget that Google and Apple will use your device to constantly record everything you're saying in their attempts to recognise the trigger words for their AI assistants.

      Let's not forget that Australia has no laws protecting net neutrality so our ISPs and the government are already monitoring what we do. The proof is in the internet filter (filtering required monitoring) and the whole Dallas buyers club fiasco (ISPs were able to report because they were already logging your usage). Now they're taking it one step further with the NBN monopoly proposing to block/slow down Netflix unless you pay the Netflix tax they are planning on implementing. Wouldn't surprise me if they planned to implement different pricing tiers based on the quality of the stream.

      Comparatively, the 'potential' for China to spy on us is not as scary.

      • -7 votes

        People don't forget, they just dont care. Meanwhile commies in China knock off and push headfirst into an authoritarian super-dystopia. It's funny, until it's not.

      • -1 vote

        Comparatively, the 'potential' for China to spy on us is not as scary.

        Except that if you buy a Huawei ANDROID phone. You are inviting both Google and China to spy on you.

      •  

        |Comparatively, the 'potential' for China to spy on us is not as scary.

        its not really the potential for spying. I think all devices have it.

        It's what it is used for.

        I think for most of us, if we don't say ill word or have friends (or friends of friends) whom has offeneded the PoC, we're fine.

        But for a lot of people who do have friends of friends, or friends. It might be a risk to consider.

        If theres any indication of the potential worry, just look at the rallys in HK. When around a quarter-half the potential population get of their butts to walk in demonstration of laws which put them in touching distance of forced border crossing, it says something. Especially from a group that knows the Chinese better than most.

    • +5 votes

      Scenario 1

      • Google/Apple use your personal data to try to sell you some ads.

      Scenario 2

      • Chinese govt use your personal data to track your online activities and if you happen to have criticized govt or its policies on social media etc especially if you're a dissident or ethnic minority then a very good chance of getting detained on landing in China on you next trip.

      You do realize that they filter 1.4 billion citizens data over The Great Firewall. Those filters do work very well in containing type and source of information.

      The country banned a cartoon character (Winnie the Pooh) for resembling the president for god sake.

      https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/aug/07/china-bans-win...

      • +4 votes

        Careful mate, if you say bad things about China here in ozb, you'll get 30 days ban by scotty.

        Last time I checked, Australia still a western country.

        Read this, might get censored soon.

      • +2 votes

        Been to China a couple times. People are happier, less rude, more helpful over there compared to here. Never heard a story about the government caring about what you try to find online, just how much can be blocked. Lots of Chinese friends due my girlfriend being Chinese.

        The shit I was searching over there didn't get me detained.

        I think you've been reading too much American propaganda, China is far more free than we are here. I've watched my girlfriend's father brush off a cop because he didn't agree with traffic violation. The cop just let him go. Try that in Australia.

        They also seem far more advanced than us in the northern states.

        I feel far more invaded here in Australia.

        • -1 vote

          "I've watched my girlfriend's father brush off a cop because he didn't agree with traffic violation. The cop just let him go. Try that in Australia."

          Your girlfriend's father wouldn't happen to be well connected by any chance? Friends in high places?

          Because I've seen similar in China, and brushing off fines and such isn't exactly the norm unless you know people..

          •  

            @mrdavedave: Uhh maybe. I don't speak Mandarin so not sure what was said, but it 'looked' more like he justified his actions than anything…

            🤔

            You might be right though, pretty sure I remember stories of knowing the right people

        • +3 votes

          In China if you don't speak chinese, the locals wont tell you to "speak mandarin" multiple times.

          Unlike here, if you go to white (irish/english) dominated area they shout out you "speak english!"

          Imagine if aussies go to Bali and the locals there shout at them to "speak indonesian!!"

      • -1 vote

        Google doesn't just use data to sell you ads. They use personal data to make their services/software better and more intuitive than the competition at low or no cost to consumers.

        Due to consumerism and the tradeoff between convenience and privacy, the West's dependence on their services technically gives google more power than most governments as their monopoly on smart services continues to grow.

        As for the Chinese government, if the West isn't dependent on services or infrastructure that is controlled by China, their data collection should be far less of a concern to the average western consumer.

    • +17 votes

      China gets demonized alot in the western press. But this is the most nonsensical with regards to phone spying. Seriously unless you are involved in the direct attempt of regime change or Tibetan/Xinjiang separatist terrorist activity, China dun give a crap where you normally do your shopping or how many mistresses you have or what you say to your mates on the phone.

      Plus

      plenty chinese citizens have expressed displeasure at government policies or corruption on Weibo, the chinese version of a supercharged Twitter type social media platform. They dun get arrested. Authorities only take notice of you if you break any law, create a false rumor that incite mass panic, attempt to subvert state, separatism or terrorism. If you are foreigner then there is even less chance of getting arrested unless as I said you commit a crime or you are one of those exiled dissident or Falun gong cultist hell bent on inciting regime change in china.

      By the way you can still find winnie the bear on Weibo or baidu( the Chinese Google) lol. It isn't banned. If only people can do a simple search.

      •  

        And plenty of Chinese are on a list and I'm sure their social credits reflects that. If you're a canadian you probably want to leave as the ccp have a tendency to arbitrary detain foreigners. This whole I'm a good little citizen so it's not even that bad is hogwash.

      • +3 votes

        plenty chinese citizens have expressed displeasure at government policies or corruption on Weibo, the chinese version of a supercharged Twitter type social media platform. They dun get arrested.

        Well, you should go tell this to people who have recently been arrested for these exact things or you can go tell the Chinese govt that they have made a mistake. Of all the cases listed in below report, I found one interesting, case of a girl who got arrested and put in Psychiatric hospital for throwing ink at Xi's poster.

        https://www.businessinsider.com.au/how-china-deals-with-diss...

        create a false rumor that incite mass panic, attempt to subvert state, separatism or terrorism

        Almost all human rights activists, lawyers and college professors that China has detained since 2015 crackdown have been charged with above offences. Most of those detained haven't been seen again. Legal and justice system is totally rigged and controlled. Getting a fair trial is just wishful thinking.

        https://www.amnesty.org/en/latest/campaigns/2018/07/china-hu...

      • +1 vote

        Winnie the Pooh is everywhere in China, seems to be very popular for shirt prints.

      • -1 vote

        Just out of curiosity, I always wondering what is the story about the organ harvesting from Falun Gong practitioners and other political prisoners in China. (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Organ_harvesting_from_Falun_Go...)

        Is this really happening in China?

    •  

      Apple has your bank account & spending patterns monitored. They pretend privacy for marketing aim to keep you locked. They all monitor your habits. That's how they decide their designs. China is just catching up, trying to compete.
      We need to be more honest as Society/Community. Celebrities have the most privacy exposure. We all become celebrities.

    • +2 votes

      From speaking to many people who have lived and has more direct relations to China than myself, I think you have been sucked into the propaganda of the Chinese.

      So many fear for their (and their families and friends) safety and security, and would never travel to China (and now HK too). Sence of retribution amongst the PoC is strong (they feel).

      Google
      - china uighurs ABC news
      - social credit china ABC news

      China takes no prisoners (excuse the pun).

      I don't know as many people who fear for their lives using a google or apple phone.

      •  

        Couldn't agree more. Had the same thoughts until going there a couple times.

        The freedoms they have outside of internet censorship and what I would consider radical action makes us look oppressed.

        America hates China, and unfortunately most of our internet is American trash. Hard not to see past the propaganda.

        People seem nicer and more friendly over there, and have a lot of respect for everyone else. I'm honestly wondering if I'd like people more if our internet filtered out all the hateful garbage I seem to rest

      • +3 votes

        You need to clear things inside your mind (and people need to start thinking more)
        What does Chinese government practices have to do with me buying a Huawei phone in Australia WITH GLOBAL software?

        Chinese government doesn't want my data, but Google/Apple/Australian government do and they all get it. Easily.

        And here we are, talking about Huawei like noone else steals data.

        smh

          •  

            @Ozama Bean Bargain: You literally shard THE SAME article from four different sources.
            Also, since when are articles that say the word ALLEGEDLY in the title, proof of anything?

            Edward Snowden, might wanna google his name

            • -1 vote

              @nikoris:

              You literally shard THE SAME article from four different sources.

              Just to show that it wasn't just a blog someone wrote in their basement.

              Edward Snowden, might wanna google his name

              It's funny you bring up Edward Snowden to the argument. I wonder if he was Chinese and did the same, what would have happened to him. Firing squad? Labour camp? Organ Harvesting? I guess I would never know.

              I don't think of any country where you work for a national security agency and spill out state secrets and they would give you a medal for that. Do you? Would love to know if you do?

              •  

                @Ozama Bean Bargain: So, because Chinese government is bad, we don't buy huawei.

                Just bought something made in Bangladesh. Literally googling 'Bangladesh gonverment' to see if i'm gonna return it back lmfao

                Can't argue with that logic
                Won't argue with that logic

                •  

                  @nikoris: You can twist argument and logic as it suits you but it won't change anything.

                  You are the one who wrote below line and I just countered it.

                  And here we are, talking about Huawei like noone else steals data.

                  Have you seen anyone bashing OPPO, Xiaomi, Vivo etc here often?

                  Huawei has to be the shadiest of companies to have existed.

                  • Indian security services accused Huawei of aiding Taliban back in 2001.

                  • Cisco accused them of stealing their source code in 2003. Huawei admitted to this, but the case was eventually dropped after Cisco and Huawei reached an agreement.

                  • FBI started an investigation into Huawei’s founder for potential violations of U.S. trade sanctions in Iran in 2007, the very thing they would charge Huawei with in 2019 (pre-Trump BTW).

                  • Motorola sued the tech giant for corporate espionage in 2010. The suit was eventually settled in 2011.

                  • T-Mobile USA sued Huawei, alleging that it had stolen trade secrets concerning a phone-testing robot used by American carrier named Tappy.

                  • Poland arrested a Huawei employee on suspicion of spying and admitted it didn’t know if it’ll use Chinese tech for its 5G network.

                  •  

                    @Ozama Bean Bargain:

                    Have you seen anyone bashing OPPO, Xiaomi, Vivo etc here often?

                    Literally noone cares about OPPO and VIVO and Xiaomi in USA, Xiaomi doesnt even sell there officially (dont know/care about others)

                    You try too hard bruh to collect data against huawei around the internet, you should find better things to woth your time.

                    Mate 30 will probably be my next phone, cheers

        •  

          |Chinese government doesn't want my data

          that's what I mean.

          I have said "I think for most of us, if we don't say ill word or have friends (or friends of friends) whom has offeneded the PoC, we're fine."

          But many people will have friends or have friends of friends that might, that data will be useful.

          •  

            @cloudy: I didn't lose any argument, of course I won them all.

            But it takes a smart person to really understand arguments in a conversation and clearly you just spend time googling 'Huawei is bad' and posting links.

            Use your brain, it's never too late.

            • -1 vote

              @nikoris: Nope, I don’t google Huawei is bad. Not so clear, but you seem to like to assume a lot, so not surprised you say that.

              I happen to read a lot, using brain is nice, only with good information. Just sitting back on your keyboard and writing junk without info is pretty useless too.

              Keep up the personal attacks, really adds to your case.

    • -1 vote

      It's not a fair comparison without comparing what they do with your data. Google wants to monetize your data. The Communist party wants you to obey.

  •  

    This or p30 pro to use as long as I can?

    • +13 votes

      Well, do you want to spend $570 or $1250?

      •  

        p30* whoops my bad. But yeah same concept, is paying a bit more worth or not?

        • +3 votes

          I don't think so. You get a bit of an upgrade on the camera but lose out on battery life. The mate is a bigger screen but is IPS vs OLED of P30. The rear finger print sensor of the Mate 20 is more reliable than the under display of the P30. Not much else to pick between the two

          On balance I'd save the few hundred and go the mate 20.

          • +5 votes

            @iforgotmysocks: Cheers mate (20). I think you are right, Ill do a bit more research before buying but thanks for the advice.

            • +6 votes

              @grimhimblem:

              Cheers mate (20)

              Haha got 'em

            • +1 vote

              @grimhimblem: Long term, you don't need the overall best. Something that meets your priorities without too much drawback is probably more important.

              I'm using an iphone se. It's an old model phone, the battery kinda sucks, and I prefer android. But I wanted a small phone.
              But before the se, I tried a Mate 10. Great phone, better than the iphone. Fast, android, and the battery life is spectacular (my 2nd priority). I really liked (and preferred) everything but the size, basically. And that one thing was enough.

              And so I recently upgraded to another iphone se with more space, to use for the next couple of years. New phones have nice features and seem good, but the size is enough of a factor for me.
              The P30 is probably close enough not to bother comparing features except where something really stands out or rubs you the wrong way.

              •  

                @crentist: So one benefit rules over all others when you value technology and size is not much tech thing other than old tech.
                You must be a LOTR funs

  • +12 votes

    upvote for the description

  • +1 vote

    just wait for mate 30 pro , 5g version. my mate 10 pro is still working good now.

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