UberEATS Motorcycle/Scooter Drivers Not Knowing Road Rules

Just wondering if everyone else has been noticing the particularly poor driving by UberEATS motorcycle/scooter riders? Usually seem to be overseas license with little understanding of Australian road rules, cutting and swerving everywhere and honestly just an accident waiting to happen.

For the record, I have both a car and motorcycle license and understand the rules for both cars and motorcycles.

The other day when I was in a carpark, I saw the following altercation between an UberEATS rider and a driver. I was stationary and waiting for the guy in front of me to reverse into a parking spot (on the left) when an UberEATS rider tried to cut in from my left and behind the reversing car. Obviously they were on a collision course, I beeped my horn so the driver would stop. The driver and UberEATS rider got into a physical altercation afterwards.

I think the issue is that these riders are riding like in Asia, where they can just cut in anywhere and just ride anywhere where there is space, there's little understanding of just waiting for the guy in front of you. I find that Australia tends to be very car centric, so as a rider, I find that if I try to act as much like a car as possible, it's generally less dangerous.

Anyway, complimentary MS paint diagram: http://i67.tinypic.com/ezoak8.png

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Comments

  • +4 votes

    Are they allowed on the footpaths too? Haymarket area, Sydney.

    I'm not sure what the rules are, but they are quite annoying.

    • +6 votes

      No, definitely not allowed on footpaths. I work in the CBD and I see all sorts of illegal behaviour - going down tram routes, pedestrian walkways, clearways, clearly places where cars and motorcyles are not allowed.

      • +2 votes

        How does OP know the licences is from overseas?

        • +3 votes

          I don't know but I once hit a dominos motorcycle delivery guy, straight up turned left onto the narrow road I was travelling down, he wasn't looking, he didn't stop, I had to slam on the brakes, ABS kicked in, still hit him, he stayed on the bike but my bumper got smashed up. I found it mildly interesting that when we exchanged details he had an Indian driver's license.

      • +3 votes

        It's shows how desperate to make some money at cost of their life. They want to make maximum delivery in short time so they can afford their international student life style. Unfortunately. They have no patience because they thinking time is. Money and immigration not allow work more then 20 hours a week.
        I know because I deal every days with those dumbs because I works in hospitality and when I hand food them if take 2 min longer get engry and upset like end of world.

    • +12 votes

      Problem is overseas students driving for delivery services like ubereats on overseas motorcycle licence. So clearly no idea of Australian road rules.

      • +6 votes

        Try finding a natural born Australian that knows the road rules is just as difficult.

        • +4 votes

          Yep, people are forever talking about having right of way, completely confused about how you would indicate to leave a roundabout, there are people who think you're allowed to go over the speed limit to pass another car, unaware cyclists are allowed to ride to abreast, indicating right when going straight at a roundabout.

          Then there's all of the entitled people who think they're above the law - speeding, running red lights, driving in emergency stopping lanes, talking on/playing with their phones, driving in the right hand lane on roads with speed limit over 80k/h, tailgating people, over .05, don't indicate when turning at a roundabout or when changing lanes.

        • +3 votes

          Yes it's the Aussie way to not give way when doing a u-turn, try to run people of the road when lanes merge, tail gate and go through red lights in quiet areas and then get road rage when someone horns them for doing one of the above.

    • +1 vote

      This is one of my big issues with food delivery riders, is they often hang around the popular places to eat, waiting for orders to come through.

      The number of times I am walking down the footpath only to have one ride straight towards me is insane, they do it as if there is nothing wrong. Sure, maybe if he came to a stop, waits for pedestrians to walk past then proceeds slowly I wouldn't have an issue with it, but you have no idea where they are going or what there intention is because they shouldnt be riding on the footpath.

      • +3 votes

        That's insane. I'd take licence plates and complain to the police and council alike.

  •  

    I feel like a similar case can be made for those food delivery riders on electric bikes. The ones that spring to mind are those yellow bikes or Pizza Hut. Putting these riders on the road or footpath with no great knowledge of road etiquette or rules is just a disaster waiting to happen.

  • +10 votes

    Why do you drive a green car?

  • +8 votes

    Last weekend, I almost collected this delivery person riding a scooter. I had green light and this guy cut me from the opposite lane to turn to his right. I almost had a heart attack and honked the horn. Guess what, he didn't even flinch, like he had the right of way. Probably was using earphones too.

    • +2 votes

      That's the sort of behaviour I'm talking about. Just complete ignorance of their surroundings and the assumption that others will not hit them.

    • +24 votes

      Mostly Asian or Indian? I think p1 was just trying to be civil/politically correct. We all know what they meant, and it's their ignorance of road rules that's really relevant, not their actual skin colour.

      • -15 votes

        Its the obvious display of walking on eggshells, pandering to the ubermoral Nazis that sticks out like a sore thumb. I think thats what djkelly pointed out and i agree.

      • +8 votes

        Yeah, this is what I meant - I'm making a judgement on what sort of license they have based on many factors, the average demographic of an UberEATS rider, the way they ride and behave on the road, their general etiquette and knowledge of road rules, and yes, their appearance (not just race, but the way they act, speak, dress, look…etc.).

        Also, as someone with a motorcycle license, it's quite easy to tell who got their license properly and not. Unlike with car licenses, the process to get a motorcycle license is much tougher. You have to enroll in an accredited course, make sure you do all of the modules properly, and the ride test is actually much tougher (not just driving around slowly, like the car test is). That's why you might see reckless riders, but very few absolutely incompetent ones the way you do with drivers.

        Either way, this isn't a post about race or politics, it's about UberEATS drivers and their behaviour on the road that's an accident waiting to happen. Their race is irrelevant.

        •  

          You need a bike license for a moped?

          • +2 votes

            @gimme: Yes. Anyone going through the AU licence scheme would not ride like the uber-eats. Unless you mean pedelecs (<250W allowed) or pure electric (<200W allowed), all other vehicles must be registered, and hence require a licence.

            • -1 vote

              @ATangk: Thought you can ride a small bile (under 100cc?) on a standard car license which most of these Uber bikes look like.

              •  

                @gimme: Not allowed, at least not in NSW.

                • +2 votes

                  @ATangk: yea my mistake, looks like things have changed since I got my bike license.

                  edit: ok this clears it up now - NSW seems to be different.

                  To ride a scooter over 50cc you need a motorcycle licence in all states, but in QLD, NT, SA and WA you can ride a scooter 50cc or less with a car licence.
                  To ride a 50cc scooter in NSW you have to get a 'conditional rider licence'.

      • -4 votes

        Are we the only country that splits asians into Asians and Indians? Everywhere else I travel, people just refer to both as Asians.

      •  

        Haha so true.

        I think there should be compulsory retesting for licences for people from countries where it is known you can buy a licence off the net or bribe an official at the counter. For example, Chinese licence isn't recognised here, so the people from mainland China go to Hong Kong and buy the licence even off sites like Taobao supposedly. So they end up with a HK licence which is then recognised here.

  • +11 votes

    I'm pretty surprised there haven't been a spate of Uber rider deaths from just how many times I've had to brake, or swerve, or whatever suddenly to avoid running one of them over.

    But on the other hand, the very real risk of accidents and injuries aside (which to be honest, is mostly to them considering the pretty dinky looking motorised scooters they mostly ride), they're at least out doing work to support themselves instead of just living off the dole, probably being paid pennies for a pretty thankless job. So eh. I try to cut them some slack when I'm not swearing at them from behind the wheel.

    • +1 vote

      Welcome back..!

    • +1 vote

      I agree, but I think it combines some of the worst traits that tend to cause accidents. Generally, it seems that the two most annoying traits on the road are unpredictability and not knowing where one is going. UberEATS riders tend to have both - they are always trying to go into any space they can, even if it's dangerous and they generally are too busy looking at their phone because they don't know the roads.

      which to be honest, is mostly to them considering the pretty dinky looking motorised scooters they mostly ride

      Yeah, but when they start cutting onto footpaths and not respecting pedestrian crossings, it becomes very dangerous to other people too.

      • +1 vote

        Biggest thing I've noticed is lack of indicators plus the use of half meter or so between parked cars and moving traffic, WHILST looking at their phone for directions. They move off with traffic or just dart out of parked spaces from a stand still and cruise along these tiny spaces without the slightest care or regard for anybody else around them or the traffic/relevant speed conditions.

        I'm equally surprised that there hasn't been more reported accidents or even deaths, they're dodging bullets the way they ride. Also, the closer to the cbd you get, the more prevelant it is.

        Victoria here and rider myself and I'm shocked and appalled at what they're being allowed to get away with. As if motorcycle riders didn't already have a hard time being accepted and recognised (in Victoria at least).

        An extension to this topic is the uber car drivers skill level. At least when in taxis, they're bright yellow and identifiable. Uber vehicles need some sort of ID themselves if you ask me (the front window sticker is near on useless from the side/behind) so that you can drive/ride accordingly. I know I take extra care when riding near taxis given how many times I've nearly been taken out by them cutting across lanes to pickup some silly pedestrian waving them down. This has just turned into a guessing game with uber vehicles.

        • +1 vote

          UberEats Cyclist here and your comment is 100% true, especially the need for stickers on the backs of cars. The amount of times I've nearly been knocked of my bike by the stupid scooters as well is ridiculous. Puts bogans in commodores to shame!

          Surprisingly, I tend to be given a heap more space and get less aggression with my UberEats backpack on as compared to regular riding / commuting. Which is odd as I'm certainly slower and take up more space.

          • +1 vote

            @IgG:

            Surprisingly, I tend to be given a heap more space and get less aggression with my UberEats backpack on as compared to regular riding / commuting.

            Do you usually wear lycra when commuting or riding regularly? My cyclist friends tell me that if you substitute lycra for normal clothes, you tend to get less hate.

    • +2 votes

      Someone had a really good theory on this sort of behaviour, Darwin I think.

    • +2 votes

      Besides, they are usually bringing me food so I cannot complain.

  • +5 votes

    This is a common topic of discussion between friends & I, especially the ones who also ride motorbikes. This type of riding makes a lot of car drivers dislike other motorcyclists as well, even when they ride to the rules. It's incredibly frustrating & i have lost count of the number of times I have almost been involved in an incident with these type of riders because of their poor riding skills.

    • +4 votes

      It's incredibly frustrating & i have lost count of the number of times I have almost been involved in an incident with these type of riders because of their poor riding skills.

      I agree - one of the things I like is the stringent requirements to get a motorcycle license. It means that most riders are good and they have a good understanding of how to be safe on the road (given how dangerous it is to ride). Some of these idiotic UberEATS riders do all the things that everyone hates on the road.

      • +5 votes

        I have always been in favour of how stringent the motorcycle license course is, I think unfortunately the major problem with these riders is riding on international licenses who haven't had to do the mandatory 2 day course (in VIC at least) to obtain an Australian license.

        I have long said that anyone driving on an international license should have to re-take a driving test in Australia to get their license converted, just because there is so much variance on how people drive in different countries & to ensure they know the road rules here, or maybe they are just really terrible drivers either way 🤷🏼‍♀️

        • +3 votes

          To make matters worse, overseas students on temporary visas, don't even have to complete the mandatory 2 day course they could just ride on the overseas licence by default for as long as long as they have the student visa.

          The government should definitely change rules for at least overseas motorcycle licence holders either temporary resident or permanent.

        • -1 vote

          I think the issue is, you can’t teach an old dog new tricks… just because they do the mandatory training/licensing - will they improve? Maybe… maybe not, but given their amount of time spent on the bike, they’re probably not going to fail the closed course p’s test either.

  • +1 vote

    Natural selection. If they want to ride dangerously outside of the appropriate rules then it ain't my problem if they get hit.

    •  

      Yeah, but when you have them going onto footpaths and disobeying pedestrian crossings, it becomes a public hazard.

  • -2 votes

    You beeped and saved the UberEats life.

    I would have brought out the popcorn.

  • +4 votes

    Isn't it true for most delivery drivers around the world, specially those on motorcycles or scooters? When you pay per delivery this kind of behavior is incentivized.

    •  

      If that's offered as an excuse, it's a bit of a cop out. You'd think avoiding a trip to the hospital would be enough incentive to drive/ride safely. Or that avoiding a fine/liability for a crash would be incentive too.

      We don't say: "When everything costs money, it incentivises bank robbers…"

      • +2 votes

        If I were an international student trying to stay afloat in Australia, I'd probably be riding around like a madman too. When I was living in the UK I came very close to signing up to some of those medical trials. People in need of money don't make the rational decisions the rest of us make.

        • +1 vote

          Oh yeah definitely. Read my other comment where I note they're at least doing something to support themselves financially instead of mooching off others.

          But if someone's in that kind of situation, if it's not riding recklessly for Ubereats, it'd likely be something else equally ill-advised.

    •  

      Nail firmly hit bang on dead centre on the head PandaExpress.

      Fact of life motorbikes and scooters are more agile in traffic and better acceleration than a 1000+kg vehicle, more cost effective to operate, lower maintenance costs etc etc etc.

      Blame Uber deliveroo Menulog for convenience food. Perhaps they should carry additional insurance policy to cover nuisance delivery personnel.

  • +2 votes

    the guy in front of me to reverse into a parking spot

    Drivers that are reversing are required to give way to pedestrians and other vehicles.

    • -1 vote

      That's impossible to park if you have to give way to other vehicles.

    • +6 votes

      The police ended up coming because of the physical altercation. I gave them some verbal evidence. They were in agreement that what the UberEATS rider did was completely idiotic.

      • +1 vote

        We see drivers and riders from all walks of life behaving badly on the road every day. It's just how it is when it comes to living in the big cities.

        •  

          Yeah I think ubereats drivers are down the list a bit. My other half nearly got wiped out by a garbage truck on the way to work this morning. There's a lot of dangerous behavior on the road from so many quarters.

        •  

          Part and parcel?

    • +4 votes

      But in a single-lane of traffic, a scooter shouldn't be trying to get around cars at all. I'm pretty sure lane-filtering doesn't apply here.

  • +1 vote

    I think food delivery riders are fully aware of the road rules and choose to ignore them.

    The parent company should take some responsibility as the riders breach so many sections of the WHS Act and the parent company is the PCBU.

    •  

      If the riders know the law and are wilfully ignoring them, what can the parent company do? It's not as if they can penalise them (at all) more than the police already can.

      •  

        Where I work the contractors can have their contract terminated or the particular individual is banned from site if their poor driving is linked to one of our projects. As a PCBU we are responsible for the actions of who we hire while they are doing work for us.

        If it's an employee and they continually break the rules of the road then they are sent for ongoing education / training followed by temporary ban from using a work vehicle followed by an extended ban. This then becomes a major pain for everyone else and the usual outcome is they stop making us look bad while in a company vehicle or they leave.

        Even the simple fact that they are riding at night with insufficient PPE, that the reflective tape on their storage containers is worn out and the bicycles and motorcycles often have defects is a breach and the PCBU should be ensuring they take all reasonably practical steps to ensure their contractors are working safely.

        •  

          Except who has ever reported an Ubereats or Deliveroo or other rider/driver? I know I haven't. Because of how they work (no centralised HQ, no physical interaction, etc - there's a really high level of plausible deniability for breaches of traffic regs and WHS regs).

          • -1 vote

            @HighAndDry: 'What consumers may not know is that restaurant owners have to sign up to some dubious contract terms if they want Uber Eats to deliver meals for them.

            One of these terms is: "You acknowledge … Uber is a technology services provider … [which does not] provide any delivery or logistics services."

            https://mobile.abc.net.au/news/2018-04-22/uber-eats-criticis...

            Uber and the internet in general were a mistake.
            The sooner Skynet becomes self aware the better.

            •  

              @Ozbargainite:

              if they want Uber Eats to deliver meals for them.

              "If". Free country. Used to be a restaurant would have its own staff deliver, don't see why that's not still possible.

    • +2 votes

      It's Uber. It's above the law. The drivers aren't employees and they aren't contractors, depending on which is most convenient for the corporation at the given time.

  •  

    Lane splitting on single lane roads, using right or left turn lanes to filter, I turn at traffic lights. Those are the major ones that will cause them injuries cause I can’t see/not expecting it.

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