Best Budget Tyre Brand?

I'm looking at Tyroola, and I'm wondering if anyone has any tyre recommendations brand wise.

Just for a Ford Focus 120kw, daily driver.

Mate of mine offered me Sailum fitted for $95 each.(215/50/17) he said best value for price point, but reviews online are bad.

Brands I'm seeing on the site include:
Rapid $62
Grenlander $65
Kinforest $70
(Excluding fitting) adds $85
Sailum listed too, just above $72

However only the Rapids being the cheapest have free shipping to Adelaide.

Thanks

Comments

  • +8 votes

    All the cheap Chinese tyre brands generally perform just about the same as each other (i.e. shit), so really you're best off just getting the cheapest ones for you if you are definitely set on getting Chinese tyres.

    There's a big jump between the crap brands and the somewhat well-known brands Dunlop/Hankook/Kumho.

  • +21 votes

    One of two places you don't want to skimp on a car is tyres! (the other being brakes!)

    over 30-50,000k, get decent rubber, it'll cost a lot less than a funeral!

    Pirelli, Goodyear, Dunlop, Continental, Hankook, Bridgetone, Toyo, Yokohama, Whatever decent tyre is on sale. cheap tyres = false economy.

    https://www.tyroola.com.au/pirelli-p-6000-powergy-21550r17-9...

    https://www.tyroola.com.au/goodyear-efficientgrip-performanc...

    When it enables you to stop several metres earlier and you avoid having to explain to a judge why you killed someone (which I'd imagine is very stressful) or just as bad, to a passengers next of kin why they're dead.

    The cost of tyres you'll probably save in terms of better braking and fuel consumption, and in not having to pay your excess when your crap tyres don't keep you on the road.

    • +3 votes

      +1 cheap tyres are a false economy…

      My wife's car had cheap tyres fitted when we bought it…
      Not only were they unsafe to drive in anything but the best conditions, they wore terribly, lasted a mere 20,000Km! And my wife is no hoon driver!
      Replaced with a set of Turanza's with a 50,000KM "guarantee".

      You pay double upfront, but get a far safer tyre that will last twice as long…

      • +2 votes

        I personally like Hankook.
        They're like the cheapest of the known-brand tyres but offer better performance than some of their competitors. You really get good value out of them, as long as your fitter doesn't rip you off on other things.

        Things like the luxury Pirelli, Toyo, or Goodyear demand a pretty premium… and it could be worth it depending on what you want.

      • +2 votes

        This reminds me of cheap motorcycle helmets being promoted in Vietnam where they said it is very hard to destroy. But when people used it and fell off the bike, the helmet still in good shape but the biker's head is damaged and they died.

        •  

          The helmet is meant to absorb the energy of the collision and fall apart, allowing minimal transfer to the head. Unbreakable helmets mean all the collision energy is transferred into the rider's head.

      •  

        In saying this… bought a 2014aurion
        18,500km with michelin primacy tyres and it was owned by a church… only done 10000km since november and im almost down to the wear markers… havent hooned or spun the wheels, so not all "brand" names last much better tbh.

        Hopefully the next pair last a bit longer

        •  

          Down to the indicators on all 4 or just your fronts? Is it even wear across the tyre?
          Usually early wear is an indicator of a bad alignment or possible under/overinflation.

          Primacy are not known to be a fast wearing tyre, I suspect there's something else at play.

          •  

            @nafe: I got 45,000km out of my Primacy tyres and they still had a few thousand km left in them. But I am a conservative driver. Replaced them with Chinese Toyo (USA parent company) because they are known to be a very quiet tyre, and they were a lot cheaper. They are holding up well after 10,000km, and are much quieter than the Primacy.

      •  

        Dupe comment

  • +7 votes

    Kuhmo

    those listed are garbage, do not skimp on tyres

    •  

      Kumho not Kuhmo.

      I think these are shipped with all new Hyundais and Kias from Korea? I find them cheaper than the western/Japanese brands but still decent.

      Hankook is Korean too.

      •  

        My bad Kumho.

        Yes shipped on Korean cars as factory standard. I have a set for my i20 off a 2017 Hyundai accent. No complaints so far.

        I had a few sets of Kumho Ku31s on my WRX, these were an amazing wet weather tyre. Put them on my missus car too. I liked them better than Brigrstones. Only downside is they are slightly noiser but for the price with better performance hard to go past.

        •  

          I've tried KU31s on a couple of cars (in different sizes) and found them to become absolutely terrible in the wet once halfway through their tread life. Much worse than Bridgestones or Michelins I've had in that regard.

  • +1 vote

    The name brands often have their old tread pattern as a different brand name at a much cheaper price than a) the current tread pattern and b) a cheaper price than it was when it was the current tread pattern.

    I have purchased the superseded Bridgestone Tyre pattern sold as, I think, Lassa. That car is at home and I’m not, so I cannot verify the brand name at the moment, but I think that I’m correct. 33 000+ kilometres and still going. They have been on the front of the (front wheel drive car) and on the rear. (I rotate my tyres front to rear approximately every 10 000 kilometres.)

    You can probably ask most tyre dealers about the practice, and specifically Bridgestone dealers about the Lassa brand.

    I hope that this is helpful to you.

  • +3 votes

    https://www.bobjane.com.au/a/215-50r17-tyres/hankook/ventus-...

    4 fitted for $474. You don't have to buy rubbish tyres to save money.

    • +4 votes

      These are on promotion at Bob Jane - buy 3 get 4. Brings it down to $118.50 each. Far far better than saving a few dollars and getting a budget tyre.

  • +4 votes

    You have mentioned ‘daily driver’ and ‘120kw’. Both are things that car people would say, which leads me to believe you that you don’t know about cars but drive ‘enthusiastically’.

    Only buy cheap rubbish tyres if you 1. Only drive to the station in traffic (ie slow, no long highway trips) 2. Are just about to sell the car and it needs tyres for rego.

  •  

    I think I'd rather live and stick to a tyre that keeps my car on the road.

  • +6 votes

    The muppets you see spinning out going slowly round a roundabout in mildly damp conditions on Dashcam Owners Australia YouTube channel are using these cheaply made crappy tyres. Don’t do it.

  •  

    Any one have comparison on different tyres from trials so we can have some facts ?

  •  

    None.

    Buy reputable, proven tire brands.
    They’re the only contact point between the car and the road, why cheap out?

  •  

    Nankang has been recommended to me by my mechanic. He used to work for Mercedes, now he owns tyre place. Agree with most of the comments above though, for a daily driver don't roll the dice with super cheap noname tyres.

  • +1 vote

    Look for the better known tyre brands doing a buy 3, get 1 free promo. Ring around the local tyre shops.

  •  

    Never heard of any of these brands? I once decided to get cheap tyres as possible on my old Corolla, was like $60 ea for some generic Malaysian tyre. Can echo the sentiments of others - they didn't last long and had no grip. Ended up replacing them with Bridgestone Ecopia which were brilliant for a small car.

    Stick to your Bridgestone, Michelen, Goodyear and maybe Yokohama, Dunlop. Some good budget oriented tyres are also made by Kuhmo. There are also some rubbish sub-brands within the major brands so beware.

  • +1 vote

    If you really have to then Kinforest KF550 is the better one.

    With tyres
    Price
    Grip
    Life

    Pick two

    •  

      What if I have no life?

    •  

      You forgot durability

    •  

      Man my Kinforest KF550s were so sketchy in the wet. Going around a roadabout in my old BA, hit a little bump in the wet and it snapped sideways. Wasn't driving silly either haha.

    • +1 vote

      Softer compounds have grip at the expense of 'life', so it's not quite this simple.

      •  

        It is actually almost as simple as that. The two main factors for a tyre are grip and durability. More grip, less durable because soft. More durable equals harder and therefore less grip. It’s a sliding scale between them.

        The you can add price to make a three way comparison. If you want the most extreme versions you get to choose two factors. If you are happy with a three way compromise, you get middle of the road stuff for each.

        Cheap, long life: hard and less grip.
        Long life and good grip: expensive.
        Good grip and cheap: not going to last long because soft.

        Sure you can add comfort into the factors being supple ride quality and less noise but typically more comfort comes from a softer tyre - which fits into the durability and grip factors.

        The three way comparison works for quite a few things. Eg bicycles: cheap, strong, light pick any two.

        •  

          Funny that, cheap+grippy was never something I stumbled upon. Cheapest softer compounds when I was buying were Yokohamas. They were dearer than three other short-listed tyres of the same size. I went with Kumho KU31s as possibly the second-best for what I intended. They were also cheapest by a small margin.

          The first time I wanted Yokis in the same size was in 1993. Local dealer stuffed up, I ended up with Goodyear Eagles that were terrible.

  •  

    I’ve generally found that Kuhmo to be the best bang for buck tyres.

    Not great, not terrible, sort of middle of the road.

  •  

    Kinforest or imperial…..if can afford more hankook

  •  

    With those choice of tyres I'm glad you don't live in Sydney.

  • +1 vote

    Using Goodride on my car, lasted 50k so far and going strong… thinking of another 20k before I get another four. Used tyresales.com.au

    •  

      What specific tread are you using?

    •  

      they've lasted 50k but how do they stop in the wet?

      Are they noisy?

      There's more to a tyre than how many km you can get out of it for the cheapest price.

      •  

        RP28. No rain these days were I am, will find in next 3-4 months. So far performance has not been so bad in cornering and stopping during the past two wet seasons. I'll change these in the next 12 months so this will be their last wet season. I use my car to take me to work and back mostly so mileage is important to me (being an OZBargainer) , so these tyres do not do any intentional drag racing or anything.

      •  

        brad1-8tsi on 06/08/2019 - 07:44new

        Are they noisy?

        There's more to a tyre than how many km you can get out of it for the cheapest price.

        And that’s why I don’t use Pirelli tyres.

        They were the noisiest tyres I have ever put on any of my cars. They were so bad that I thought that the car had suddenly developed a problem with the diff (rear wheel drive car)!

        And it’s been a similar experience with other Pirelli tyres since.

  • -1 vote

    You really want tyres that keep your car stable in wet conditions, not slide all over the road.

    I've found yokohamas to be best for that.

  •  

    All unknown brands. Impossible to make any recommendation.
    These chop and change all the time.

    Check the tyre ratings and go with what suits best
    See here: https://www.tyrepower.com.au/tyres/tyre-tips/tyre-loadspeed-...

    Hopefully the tyres are rated correctly!

    Another thing to consider is performance vs Long lasting/wear

    The harder the rubber in a tyre the longer it lasts but grip and performance suffer.
    And conversely the softer the rubber the better the grip but it wears quicker.
    So thats another factor for your consideration

    Most importantly check the tyre size label on your car and make sure the tyres you fit match the label. This information is also in the owners manual.

  • +1 vote

    Surprised no one's mentioned http://tyresales.com.au/

    You can get $25 off if you use someone's referral code (I think), or $50 off if you find a coupon code off the internet.

    I got 2 Goodride Tyres for my Yaris (175/65R14 82H) - $78 for BOTH. They seem pretty decent so far.

    Order Details
    Includes fitting & balancing
    Congratulations - $50 off your order has
    been applied!
    12 month tyre roadside assist: FREE
    Total Tyre Price: $128
    GST Total: $7.09
    Order Total: $78 incl. GST

  •  

    Just to save a “few dollars”? Just plain crazy! Even the premium brands are fairly well priced in that size.Advice: do not skimp on tyres.

  •  

    never get cheap tyres, it is not worth it
    consider all that is on the road is 4 tyre prints the size of your hand
    it has to stop quickly in case of an emergency, turn quickly sometimes
    will it grip well enough when you slam on the anchors?
    will you only drive it around town or do 100km/h down the highway with your family inside?
    I used to be a mechanic that worked at a tyre joint in the 80's
    the stories I heard, cheap tyres are not worth it

    I use Toyo NanoEnergy 3 on my car, it is nothing too flashy

  •  

    Always shop around, look through catalogues, websites and instore. I ended up getting Bridgestone Potenzas fitted for $400 from Bridgestone. Which has every 3 months free check-up including tyre rotation, alignment, spare tyre inflation, clean and shine, battery check, free puncture replacement, 25,000km warranty, plus a few more perks. Should be able to get an alignment for around the $50-$60 mark when buying tyres.

  •  

    I'd go with a branded tyres. Correct me if I am wrong, I think Bridgestone currently has a buy 3 tyres and get the fourth free.

  •  

    I think European tyre brands e.g. pirelli and michelin are generally softer rubber compounds and generally wear quicker than the korean and jap brands. The benefit of a softer compound is greater handling and performance. Maybe someone can confirm or deny this?

    • -1 vote

      Agree… so soft that I had a an old Goodyear punctured at 160km/hr… due to heat of the day and wear on it… lucky we noted and stopped in time…

  • -1 vote

    I just love all these comments about tyres from all the so called experts here……It could be a Holden Vs Ford thread…… LOL

    •  

      Not really, they are mostly accurate. The cheap Chinese tyres are mostly crap, I especially hated winruns, as not only were they rubbish, but for some reason the beads were always very close together and were a nightmare to get seated on wheels. As a general rule, you get better grip, longevity and quietness out of proper brands.

  •  

    Pirelli P Zero.

  • -1 vote

    A friend had a bad experience (Ply separation) with a Chinese brand of tyre.

    I would not take chances with these. I'll just stick to my Hankooks. I have been using them since the 90s.

    •  

      Goodyear had thousands of tread separations back in the day. So did Dunlop. I run Dunlops now and would run Goodyear even though I processed hundreds of Goodyear tyre claims when I worked for them.

      A survey sample of 1 person with "a chinese brand of tyre" is possibly statistically to small?

  •  

    Those 5 brands are so cheap it's not worth comparing. They are all in the same bucket.
    Don't be cheap and for the sake of public safety and pedestrians buy a better brand tyre for a sake of $100 max extra for all 4. It will get you better handling and grip in the long run using the known brands.

  •  

    Tyres are definitely one of those areas where, as has been stated earlier many people allow a 'false economy' to prevail - that being that they focus on saving a small amount of money upfront but this either costs or risks costing them an expotential amount more later.

    Considering the average driver does 15,000km/yr and if properly inflated (and you will find the car makers pressure recommendations are NOT going to give your tyres the longest life or best performance - as the car makers want the ride to be more comfortable & quiet, so if 33psi advised actual tyre experts will advise ~38psi will give best tyre life+performance - and no this doesn't result in centre wear, thats higher inflations e.g 45psi) - you should get 2-3yrs minimum from tyres.

    So I understand the temptation to save maybe 30% on a no-name brand that to a layperson looks just as good a tyre to the brands you know - but the reality averaged out over the lifespan of the set of tyres this is a near irrelevant saving - especially when put in context of the total costs of owning & running a car in Australia.

    Cars are generally 1000 to 2000kg of metal hurtling along roads at speeds often upwards of 100km/hr - and even in the the most state of the art car, that has every safety feature on the market at any point in time the ONLY thing thats in contact with the road is a few square inches of your tyres.

    If they fail to do whats required - then the rest of the features are generally damage limitation oriented - and that shows it's clearly best to not have your tyres fail in the first place - so you'd think people would want the absolute best possible. Now we're all on budgets so thats often not possible, but going out and buying what is likely very crappy tyres just to save a fraction of a cent/km you use them is going the other way.

    Likewise using your tyres until they're completely illegal - is IMHO a bit silly - as they're far less capable (especially in the wet) and you're now saving very little but risking a lot.

    Haha final tyre tip….if you have a fullsize spare - make sure you're rotating it in with your tyres (as you are rotating them at proper intervals right?) no point having 4 well worn out tyres and a brand new unused spare in the boot (and generally you always want your BEST tyres on the fronts) - people often leave their spare unused and not only is it wasted through non-use - tyres only have a certain life (several co's recommend 5yrs) and so maybe in 6-8yrs it won't be suitable for fulltime use due to cracking, material aging etc - so use it while you can. Get new set of 4 when needed and put best old one in your boot as the spare. :-)