Masterplug 20m 10A 4 Socket Extension Lead Reel $36.50 (Was $69.90) @ Bunnings

1620

Good Price. Enjoy :)

Masterplug offers a lightweight and sturdy reel, this portable solution delivers for most garden and home improvement situations. It has been designed and engineered for longevity. The plastic drum provides reliable protection when in use, transported or stored. Using 20m 1.0mm highly visible Heavy Duty green cable, this range of extension reels provides 4 x 125V 10amp sockets, power switch and has a built-it overload and reset button for extra safety.

4 Sockets
20m Heavy Duty Cable with SAA plug
Thermal cutout
Over current protector
On/Off switch

Thanks to Pricehipster

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Comments

  •  

    Tomorrow:

    20m 10A 4 Socket Extension Lead Reel $36.90 @ ALDI

    •  

      Can't seem to find that on Aldi's site.

    •  

      4 x 125 V sockets is WRONG;
      we still use 240 V AC in AU

      Total Current (in Amp's): 10 A

      So, None of the sockets can
      give over 10 A (We "never"
      need over 10 A, w/ devices)

  • +1 vote

    They skimped on the volts: "provides 4 x 125V 10amp sockets". No deal!

    • +3 votes

      Oh how many volts do I need?

      • +2 votes

        You can't have 125v because we use 230v power.
        125v is a mistake

      • +6 votes

        It isn't a maximum of 1250W per socket.

        You have used 125v*10a = 1250w
        But that is a mistake on the website because we don't use 125v in Australia.

        Your statement means that the cable can carry 5000w which it can't. Neither can the 10a power point it is connected to.

        The cable has a maximum rating of 10a.

        The maximum output over all 4 outlets is 2400w (10a), it is not per outlet.
        If you have 4 things plugged in the maximum each can use is 600w.

        It is the same as a power board.

        •  

          A 4.2mm wire should be enough to accommodate 4 * 1250W.

          •  

            @whooah1979: So?
            And a 4mm² flexible cable is rated to carry 25a.

            This is a 10a cable, not a 25a one.

            It is for a 10a power point and circuit not a 25a one.

            It is not designed for 4 * 1250W (20a). That does not mean it is a poor quality cable.

        • +3 votes

          @spaceflight - Yes it says clearly on the reel that it is 10amps… all up.

          The other downside of these reels is that you have to roll the full 20 metres out if you are putting anything but a tiny load through it. (states that too). I'm not an electronics expert but gather if you don't it can turn into a heat generating device.

          • +1 vote

            @Public21:

            Yes it says clearly on the reel that it is 10amps… all up.

            I know. That's what I have said.

            The other downside of these reels is that you have to roll the full 20 metres

            That it true.
            If you have 4 layers of cable then it can only carry 40% of the rated load.
            3 layers is about 50%
            2 layers is about 60%
            1 layer is about 75%

            •  

              @spaceflight: Nu?

              So, what happens if
              you Don't Unroll it?

              Surely, low current
              applications wouldn't
              cause issues unrolled

              •  

                @IVI:

                So, what happens if you
                Don't Unroll it?

                It can get hot, melt, catch fire.
                Heat also causes more resistance which will give you a further voltage drop and then a higher current draw which makes more heat

                Surely, low current
                applications wouldn't
                cause issues unrolled

                Low current wouldn't.
                If you have 4 layers of cable then it can carry 40% of the rated load which is 4 amps.

                I don't know how many layers this has when rolled up.

                •  

                  @spaceflight:

                  It can get hot, melt, catch fire.

                  Not true. I own this cable reel, and I have brewed beer in my 40L urn with the reel only 1/4 unrolled. The urn draws about 9 amps constantly, 2,160 watts, and the reel gets a little warm to the touch but no where near hot enough to be a fire risk.

        •  

          You have used 125v*10a = 1250w

          If someone was a real pain in the ass annoyance he or she would mention that incorrect units have been used.

          125V*10A = 1250VA, as no power factor has been stated we have only calculate apparent power (VA) not active power, Watts.

          125V* 10A* cos φ(1) = 1250W maximum, maximum as power factor (cos φ) will often be less than 1.

          Regardless of being 230 or 240V the max rating of concern is 10 Amps, if you are at the end of the line and you have voltage sag to say 220V then you cannot supply 2400W, only 2200W as it would take 2400w/(220v*Cos φ) = 10.9Amps to supply 2400W at 220V.

          I don't mean to disagree with your statement, just add to the discourse.

    • +2 votes

      My guess is just a carryover/typo from a US version. It says elsewhere that it's 240v

  • +3 votes

    Thanks. Bought something that I will actually use.

  •  

    Wait what? Aren't we running on 240v here?

    • +2 votes

      Nope. We run 230v in Australia (officially)

      • +1 vote

        It isn't official, it is the nominal voltage.

        And it doesn't apply to WA and QLD as they are still using 240v.
        QLD is moving to 230v

        • +1 vote

          Does my bill go down when they drop the volts to 230?

          •  

            @Elyxar: Maybe.

            If you are currently getting 240v you are getting 240 volts (+/-6%) 254 V to 225 V

            Most of Australia and appliances are designed to operate on 230 volts with an allowable (+10/-6%) and a preferred operating range of +6% to –2%. (244 V to 225 V).

            So if your appliance is modern and designed for 230 V but you are getting power on the high side of 240 V you are getting a higher voltage than the appliance preferred operating voltage (above 244 V)

            This means it isn't going to operate as efficiently so will use more power than is needed.

          •  

            @Elyxar: It should… after all:

            You pay for KW-Hrs

            KW = V x A

            So, cutting V's reduces KW's

            • +2 votes

              @IVI:

              You pay for KW-Hrs

              KW = V x A

              kW = V * A * cos φ / 1000

              It depends what appliance.

              Many electrical devices will be powered from switch mode power supplies, that will consume/supply pretty much the same amount of power over the range of volts we are talking about.

              If your mains supply drops 10% in voltage, then your computers, chargers, battery dyson, tv, sound system, blue ray player, streaming box, (non dimmable) led lights and the like will draw 10% more current to continue to supply their internal systems at the correct voltage and power, so no, no savings due to reduced voltage.

              W = V * A * cos φ, but as the Watt load needed is fixed for many devices (like above), the Watts will stay the same while Amps go up and down in response to supply line voltages, in opposite and equal proportions.

              Simple devices like an oven, space heater or toaster will run at less power, but will need to be "on" longer to supply the heat needed, so no saving there either.

              Corded vacuums may consume a little less power, but will you vacuum for longer?

              The garage door opener may use a little less power, but it will be slower, so the overall kWh will be pretty much the same, after all the work down to lift the door will not change to any great extent.

              kWh = Watts * hours/1000, as above the lowered kW figure will be offset by the increased hours figure needed to use the same amount of energy to complete the task, which will often not have changed, i.e boiling 1l of water will still take the same kWh, just it will be less kW and more hours.

              Fans, filament globes, fluro lights, some dimmable leds, will use less power.

            •  

              @IVI: No it shouldn't.
              Read my comment above.

              KW = V x A

              That's wrong

              V X A = Watts

              1,000 W = 1kW

              1,000 W for 1 hour = 1 kWh (this is what you pay for)

              So, cutting V's reduces KW's

              No it doesn't. Again read my post above to where you might save energy from lower voltage.

              Watts are the things that give you what you want.
              You might need 500w to boil a cup of water.
              At 10 V or 500 V you still need 500 W.

  • +2 votes

    Thanks .Ordered one for pick up.

  • +1 vote

    Got one thx OP. Checked instructions says max load 240~ 10A so no problem with it. BTW it comes with overload protection pretty decent.

  • +1 vote

    Got one. Ta.

  • +3 votes

    I wonder if this would be taken into account.

    From the wiring rules

    1. Where a flexible cord is wound on a drum, multiply current-carrying capacity by the appropriate factor, as follows:
      Number of layers: 1 2 3 4
      Derating factor: 0.76 0.58 0.47 0.40
  •  

    If I'm using it in the house for say vacuuming or in the garage on a portable air pump do I need to roll the entire 20m out or won't matter for something that will take 5-10 minutes work

  •  

    make sure to un-reel entire cable before using it, otherwise it can cause fire. Especially if you are using it at full capacity.

    • -2 votes

      You need to roll it out depending on the power load.

      If you have 4 layers of cable then it can only carry 40% of the rated load.
      3 layers is about 50%
      2 layers is about 60%
      1 layer is about 75%

    •  

      Not with this reel. See my comment above.

  • +16 votes

    Only the ozb crowd would overanalyze an extension cord. Most people would just plug and use it.

    • +3 votes

      I love the info on eveey new item purchased. I get a professional opinion on everything.

    • +1 vote

      If there's a Safety issue,
      it Pays to know the risks.

      It's just: Today's devices
      use far Less Power than an
      electrical garden tool, etc.

      So, Wiring Rules may have
      an Exception (I'd expect)
      to, eg, the unroll rules..?

      • +1 vote

        I'm all for safety but this type of overkill does my head in. Pretty much any device that's pushed to their limits may have safety implications but seriously this is just an extension chord that people will use it for some incidental stuff every now and again. Noone in their right mind will be running heavy equipment off this thing. If you read the safety instructions on every electrical or other device you buy (mostly legal indemnity) you won't even take it out of the box. Something to be said about common sense.

  •  

    Saw similar thing at Costco Moorabbin VIC $31.99 ( 25m )

  •  

    1.0mm cable? No thanks.

  •  

    Can we stop arguing and trying to find ways that we can use this without unrolling it? Stop being lazy and just use it fully unrolled, every time you use it. It’s got a crank handle, won’t take long to roll it back up. It simple isn’t worth the heat and potential fire risk. If you want to use it for something <10M, buy a 1M/2M/3M/5M/10M extension lead and powerboard.

    Thanks for the deal OP

    • +1 vote

      Even at full capacity this reel doesn't get hot enough to be a fire concern when used rolled up. I know because I own it and have done it. See my comment above.

      •  

        What about the magnetic field it generates? I don't want my prized VHS collection getting wiped.

  •  

    Why does it say "Do not operate, unless fully unreeled"?

    • +1 vote

      125V*10A = 1250VA, as no power factor has been stated we have only calculate apparent power (VA) not active power, Watts.

      125V* 10A* cos φ(1) = 1250W maximum, maximum as power factor (cos φ) will often be less than 1.

      Regardless of being 230 or 240V the max rating of concern is 10 Amps, if you are at the end of the line and you have voltage sag to say 220V then you cannot supply 2400W, only 2200W as it would take 2400w/(220v*Cos φ) = 10.9Amps to supply 2400W at 220V.

      EDIT: Picked mine up this arvo, and the drum isnt perfectly aligned with the frame, it's about 5 degrees out. I'm a little bit OCD so that's unsettling. Im going to have a go at it fully wound up anyway. Haven't decided on amperes yet. Might go with five.

      •  

        It's fine. 5 amps won't warm it up much. I've ran mine 3/4 rolled up at 9amps for over an hour, and it got warm but nowhere near the temps needed to be a fire concern.

      • +2 votes

        I hadn't planned to, but did purchase one the weekend gone when I happened to be at bunnings, it's all fairly square and parallel where needed, maybe I got lucky.

        5A should be a safe start, only 25% the heat load of the 10A rating, 7.1A being 50%.

        I'm tempted to put a few devices on it and see where the thermal overload trips.

        Edit, didn't see the above, nice to now you tested 9 Amps.