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Philips HD2137/72 All-in-One Cooker $131.25 Delivered @ Amazon AU

620

Awesome pressure cooker / slow cooker combo, looks like its been posted here a few times. I have this older model with the aluminium bowl and use about twice a week with no issues.

There is a newer model link with a ceramic bowl which may be worth waiting for a deal on. Could be trying to clear old stock?

Makes me feel like making a curry now.

From the page:

Generous 6L capacity
Saute/Sear with high & low temperature
Pressure cook with various direct menu buttons
Multi cook menus with recommended cooking time
Automatic keep warm for 12 hours, reheat functions
Slow cook with high & low temperature up to 12 hours

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Comments

  • +8 votes

    I have one of these and it is very very good.

    I would prefer a ceramic bowl as in the new model to the non stick but for my slow cook curries it has been a complete non issue.

    Great price

    •  

      I love my Phillips All-in-one.
      Its essentially a pressure cooker and slow cooker combined. But the best part for me is that it turns itself off when its finished. I can start a stew/risotto and leave the house without worrying about burning the house.
      I even use it to boil eggs. Good for people who get easily distracted by more important things than remembering the stove or over off.

  •  

    Does the Saute feature really Saute? or do you find yourself getting the frying pan out? Cheers!

    •  

      Sauté not fantastic. For best results I use the frypanfirst

    • +2 votes

      I think it depends what you are doing. Browning meat is just OK, but the base is so small, you have to do it in really small batches. A stir fry would be horrible in one of these.

      It is useful though when thickening sauces after slow cooking, as you can get a good rolling boil going pretty quickly.

    • +2 votes

      It all depends how picky you are. I'm very happy with the Sauté function because I hate doing more washing up than I have to. Seriously, though, I've sauteed onions & garlic, browned meat and even fried crispy potatoes once and all worked out well.

      • +1 vote

        I concur. Better than the frying pan, as the pot it's deep, and the oil never sprays out.

  •  

    Can anyone comment on how this model compares to the Breville The Fast Slow Cooker? Primarily interested in the Pressure/Slow Cooker, the other features I could take or leave. Thanks :)

  •  

    I bought this from the last Myer deal, very happy so far, been using it for cooking rice, meat and soup.

  • +1 vote

    So I have one of these and I am reluctant to to give it a good review. When it works, it is incredible and makes amazing dishes. But I have been facing issues with mine (about 2-3 years old) where the seal doesn't work because it gets too loose and the machine won't pressurise. Gone to Philip's website and got another seal, only to have the same thing happen few months later. Don't really wanna keep buying a new seal every few months…

  • +3 votes

    If I wanted one I would rather wait for the newer model HD2237/72 to go on sales again, twice previously were at $143.20, as it heats up faster and has a better bowl.

  • +3 votes

    Love these. Excellent for getting on the ASIO alert list.

  •  

    I recommend the Heller electric pressure cooker instead which is usually priced may be $10 less than this, and can often be had for around $110 or even less using ebay coupons. It's got a stainless steel inner bowl as well (which was an important criteria for me). It has been doing its job exceptionally well for over 6 months now, and we use it may be a couple of times a week.

    • +1 vote

      Looks like its 88$ right now? 15 % off on ebay.

      https://www.ebay.com.au/i/332813350314

      •  

        ctually can save postage too if you have ebay plus. So down to 80. SO whats the verdict? 80$ for this or 131 for the phiilips? I have a standard 5L from big w that is pressure cooker only..

      •  

        That's a really good price. I'd buy one if I were looking for it.

    • +1 vote

      Why is this better than the Philips? Is it better to go with a known brand like Philips?

      •  

        The Heller comes with top quality stainless steel inner bowl, which is what your food sits and cooks in. This was an important factor for me, because most other cookers were having some aluminium bowl with a non-stick coating. The build quality of this cooker is also absolutely solid for the price!

        I've a couple of other Heller products (a blender and an induction cooktop).

        I had a problem with the rubber seal breaking up in the blender, but received excellent support when I contacted Heller (Gaf Control systems I think it's called) and they sent me a couple of spare seals. Never had a problem with the blender since then. This made me confident about the brand enough to purchase the other two items, and I'm mighty impressed with the induction and the pressure cooker.

        On top of this all, this is ozbargain and there's no reason for anyone here to pay more than what's necessary.

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      How does it saute/brown? Dies it get hot enough for those functions? Also how long does the keep warm function go for?

      •  

        The cooker gets hot enough for my use, although I have not used the saute function. My opinion is that it will be as good as the philips one.

        I use it to cook a variety of things, as opposed to sauteing. So far, it's been absolutely perfect.

        Of course, it's my personal experience with this cooker, and I am not paid to be advertising it here. I've also recommended it to other people, and 3 of them have purchased it. Every single one of them said they're very happy with it at different instances.

        •  

          Thanks! Just purchased. I really wanted the stainless steel inner bowl. Looked up the instructions and it seems it does allow you to set a delay up to 24 hours and keep warm function for more than 4 hours (contrary to other comments).

          Looking forward to my first pressure cooker!

    •  

      I have this and have got my sister to get one too.. very good pressure cooker. I would have liked it better if I could set the temperature lower for the slow cooker function. I can't find a way to control this and it seems to get hot very fast for a slow cooker.

  •  

    Had a Tefal All in One seals giving trouble after 1.5 years… how are this in terms of reliability ?

    •  

      Had it for just over a year. No issue so far. I do hand wash all the components with a cloth, no scour or hand sponge.

  • +1 vote

    I've had an older version for 5 years now. No issues at all. I use it for all kinds of dishes - pressure cooking meat, making risotto / pasta, making soup / stew…

    The best thing I came across is to make jam. It takes 2 hours to take a huge pot of apple / peach jam and the quality is superb. Highly recommend.

  •  

    I bought one mainly for making yoghurt. A decent yoghurt (I like the ALDI organic) costs $5/L while milk is $2/L. We go through at least 1L of yoghurt per week, so that's $3 saved per week, or $150 per year. Has paid for itself in less than a year.

    Also, fantastic for cooking porridge, especially Steel cut oats using the timer. Wake up and breakfast is ready.

    You can also transport things (stews, soups) in it - the lid locks sealed, and it has really good insulation, so cook your stew, unplug, and take it to wherever you're eating (picnic, pot luck dinner, etc). Stays warm for ages.

    Pressure cook your legumes (beans, chickpeas) from dry in heaps less time than soaking and boiling, and save compared to buying cans.

    This is really an ozbargainer's friend. (Well, any fast/slow cooker really, but this one is cheap and reliable)

    •  

      Any recipe (or link) for yogurt to share? Ta

      • +2 votes

        4Tbsp plain/natural yoghurt (aldi organic works well). Slowly add milk while stirring well up to 1L. Put in slow cooker (put a cup of water in the cooker pot, then place the yoghurt tub in), cook on yoghurt setting for 8-12 hours.

        I have found that the ALDI and Coles organic milk works really well for this since they are heat treated (not quite UHT but not far off - you can tell as they have a curiously long expiry date). Fancier milks don't work as well unless you first heat them up to almost simmering, then let cool (to not kill the yoghurt bacteria). I haven't tried standard supermarket milk.

        After 4 or so generations the yoghurt quality seems to start degrading, so I've taken to keeping a 'seed' yoghurt tub that that is reserved only for seeding yoghurt, and I regenerate that one when it runs out, but periodically buy a new pot of seed yoghurt, when the texture of yoghurt had started to degrade.

        •  

          I use aldi Uht milk also. I add powdered milk to make it thick. I use powder to double the milk "concentration", so good.

        •  

          I use Coles and Woolies organic milks. Very good for this imo. I still heat them up to 80c and then drop to 49c - makes a massive difference to the thickness of the final product. The benefit of UHT milk is that there is no other bacteria in it to fight with the yoghurt culture but the lactose isn't denatured enough compared to preheating it.

      •  

        I make 6 l of yoghurt per fortnight(!!). We go through a tonne! :)
        The best way, imho, is to heat up milk to around 80c. Leave it there for 10mins or longer, then cool down to 49c. Mix with a cup of existing yoghurt and decant into 1l jars. Then place into an insulated area - like an oven (but don't turn it on or even pre heat). Leave to incubate for 10-12 hours, then place into the fridge to set. I use an anova to run a water bath to get the milk to 80c without burning it. I also use a mixer to stir the milk. Tip the hot water out when it gets to 80c (and maybe another 30mins), fill with cold water and let the milk drop to 49c (it does that in about 5mins with my set up). Make sure the milk doesn't drop too far below 49 (or try to keep it at 49 if possible).

        The point of heating up the milk is to denature the proteins just before fermentation. If you don't, the yoghurt comes out thinner, with less body. You can add powdered milk to give the bacteria more to feed on and create a thicker product but that's almost cheating :). I use 4am natural yoghurt as a starter and organic milk and the resulting yoghurt is identical.

        Check this out: https://cooking.stackexchange.com/questions/32783/making-yog...

    •  

      What about the electricity cost?

      •  

        The yoghurt setting is low temperature, and it's insulated pretty well, so negligible. Let's say it uses 100w in yoghurt mode (it will actually be heaps less). Over 10 hours that's 1kWh. 1kwh costs 30c or less. So electricity cost will be less than 30c for 1L yoghurt.

  • +1 vote

    Just got the new model today $140 tgg I think that’s a good price for new model

  •  

    For the cooker ? I’m looking for the inner pot now

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