Moving personal data from work laptop to personal - external copy disabled

Employer has disabled copy from work laptop recently which is where I am stuck with some personal data on work laptop.
The personal data is about 100gb which is basically photos and videos from last few years of travel.
Employer doesnt have any facility or tool to copy it either.
May be some sort of website where I can upload and download later from personal laptop? But most sites seems to have upload datasize limitations?

Any advise on how can I achieve this? Thanks!

Comments

  • -1 vote

    Upload zip file parts to: https://www.wetransfer.com

    •  

      thanks, do you know what is the max filesize limit for this website?

      •  

        Looks like You can upload a maximum of 2GB per transfer using our free service.

      •  

        2GB per file on free plan which is probably ideal to avoid timeouts. You can zip/rar your content into batches automatically.

        Alternatively, you can get paid cloud services or seedbox/webhosting with FTP for a month to upload and redownload. Gsuite, Google Photos, Amazon Photos, iCloud etc.

  •  

    Employer doesnt have any facility or tool to copy it either.

    Do they not have it or do they not want to unencypt it for you? What happens when work needs to get some data off your laptop?

    My employer has software on my work laptop that automatically encrypts anything that's copied onto a USB/hard drive. They plug the USB/hard drive into another computer to unencypt the contents before it's readable on another computer.

    •  

      Unfortunately they dont have it.

      • +2 votes

        Have you tried copying onto an external drive that does not support NTFS Encryption? Maybe format a drive with exFAT (which can handle ACLs but hardly ever does) or even FAT32 if you can split the 100GB into smaller (<2GB say) parts, and see if that works.

  • +1 vote

    One drive or google photos..

  • +2 votes

    Is the HDD on the laptop encrypted?

    If not, remove the HDD from the laptop and plug it into another PC as a secondary HDD and do the copying from this other PC, once finish, install the HDD back into the laptop.

  • +2 votes

    Linux on USB drive?

  • +7 votes

    Share the folder using SMB and map it on your personal device. Copy/cut from the network drive on your main PC to your main PC

    •  

      If cifs access is allowed then this is the easiest and fastest way.

      •  

        Thanks guys, not sure I fully understand the approach. Sorry for dumb q, Can someone please point me the steps or any weblink to show how to do it?

        • +2 votes

          You can follow this - https://www.tenforums.com/tutorials/111783-share-files-folde... (Option 6)

          Once you have followed those instructions and once the share has been created, head to your personal PC and in the navigation bar of the file explorer type in the network path (in the example the network path is "\\BRINK-W10PC\Users\Brink\Pictures")
          You should see the folder that you shared from your work PC on your personal PC. Now just copy and paste them to your documents on your personal PC

          If you get any error messages or need something clarified send me a PM and I will help you further

  • +2 votes

    is your company using Microsoft 365? If yes, then you should have Onedrive where you can copy files to and normally you can access it from home network.

  •  

    Are you able to run a program downloaded from the internet or USB?

  •  

    Have you tried Volafile.org?
    Keeps the files for 2 days and then deletes them.
    Unlimited storage but I think it is limited to 20GB per file.

  •  

    dropbox web ?

  • +4 votes

    Cull 90gb of the photos and videos. You don't need 150 photos of different angles of each landmark or person.

    Upload online.

  • +1 vote

    How is it that your personal data ended up in the laptop in the first place? If it can get in then it can get out via the same way?

  •  

    I just email stuff to my personal email in 10Gb zip files

    •  

      I didn't realise Gmail could receive attachments that large? Thought it was as low as 10 or 50MB

      • +1 vote

        I think Gmail is 25MB (not certain), but if you run your own mailserver, you can have whatever (or no) limits you like.

        If you know what you're doing, you could have one up and running at home in 20 / 30 mins, but if you know what your're doing, you probably already do anyway :-)

        Having said that, I'd consider FTP as it would be easier.

        Either way, the transfer would be entirely within your LAN, and if via ethernet, would not take all that long - plus time is one thing we all have right now anyway!

        Alan.

      •  

        I probably mean 10 Mb.

  • +3 votes

    Maybe it’s against OzBargain values, but why not pay $2.49 for one month 100gb Google storage? It’ll work out to be cheaper than setting up your own storage or mail service. One month should be enough time to move your files.

    https://one.google.com/about

  •  

    1 - Get a personal NAS. Ideally one that supports two drives so they can be mirrored e.g. https://www.centrecom.com.au/qnap-2-bay-ts-231p-nas-2-year-w...

    Then you will be able to connect that to your local network and backup all your files to that. The mirrored drive means that even if or when one drive fails you will not lose the photos.

    2 - Use Google photos to copy all your photos and videos to the cloud. Slightly lower resolution, but not so much as makes much of a difference and it's free. This is the just in case backup ie in case something bad happens to the NAS.

    3 - Use a free cloud account like Dropbox to copy your important files and best/most important photos in full resolution. In the event of the NAS failing or being stolen, you can combine 2 and 3 to restore your photos etc.

  •  

    What is your job and employer?
    It's ok, I'm pretty sure you won't answer that.

    They would/should have very good reasons to lock down the laptop like that.
    Will trying to circumvent it get you into more trouble than just asking to copy your personal data off?
    Talk to your line manager and/or IT help desk.

  •  

    Attach to emails and send to new computer

    •  

      at about 10Mb usual email size limit and 100Gb to send isn't that like 10,000 emails to prepare and send?

      Doesn't sound too practical to me?

  • +1 vote

    Mega has 50Gb accounts if that helps.

    Also Google Photos has unlimited storage at 16MP photos and 1080P videos.

    You can use "Backup and Sync" to send them there then you can access anywhere any time.

  •  

    Seen this happen so many times before. IT contractor comes in, locks down Group Policy Editor, user can't change basic stuff after that. Rivers of gold for aforesaid IT contractor.

    Get the business owner to find out who locked down the PC's, then you can copy the data off. This crap is illegal as heck under Privacy Act but IT contractors get away with 'owning' the data, when it isn't theirs to own.

  • +2 votes

    I work as a technical support specialist, and have done for 20 years. Unfortunately these sorts of queries are very familiar.

    Your organisation has put these limits in place for a reason. It may be to prevent intellectual property theft. It may be to ensure data is only stored on authorised devices that are properly locked down. It may just be that they're using a recommended security standard that's been handed down from a higher authority.

    Regardless, if those limits are in place, they will also likely have monitoring software in place to detect any sort of breach of those policies they've put in place.

    Trying to overcome the restrictions you've detailed will most likely flag an alert to the appropriate teams. Whilst the reason for doing what you're doing is fine, you may get questions around why personal data was on the laptop in the first place. But you're more likely to get questions why you're attempting to defeat restrictions placed upon company equipment for personal use.

    I'm not for one second saying what you're doing is wrong or dodgy or against your company regulations. But knowing - and having seen - the consequences of breaching security protocols, i would recommendation caution. I'd also echo the comment from another responder that talking to your IT department or Service Desk is always the first course of action. It could avoid a lot of issues for you.

    •  

      Correct about the personal data being on a business device but, when I've seen this sort of thing before, the business has no dedicated IT go to person except an outside contractor who, has locked down GPedit. It's a nasty way to get reoccurring business.

  •  

    As others have already stated, I would use any cloud storage provider: OneDrive, iCloud, Google Drive, Amazon S3 (my favourite for this kind of stuff).

    Although I would add that I would encrypt my files with a password before uploading. If your employer has taken the steps to disable copying to external devices, I’m going to assume they are monitoring your internet activities too. If you encrypted the files first, they would still see you uploading lots of GBs but they wouldn’t know exactly what you’re uploading.

  •  

    pcloud.com gives you 15 GB for free.
    You can upload in less batches.

  •  

    I use Resilio sync: https://www.resilio.com/individuals/

    It uses P2P technology to share files/folders between your devices, no cloud storage required.

    There's a few other pieces of software floating around.

  •  

    Download 7zip and make an archive file. 7zip lets you create part files of any size you specify, so you can upload a few pieces at a time, and supports encryption so you don't have to worry where you upload it to.

    I would suggest you use dropbox, install it on your personal pc, and upload a piece at a time then download and delete it as you go.

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