Getting Older and Needing to Freeze Eggs/Sperm

Just wondering anyone got any idea how expensive this is? for a man in particular?

getting old, bio clock ticking and needing to extending chances of getting pregnant..

Comments

  • +34

    Speak to AlienC. He maybe able to help when/if he gets his freezer.

    Seriously though, is this really a topic you want brought up on this site?

    • +5

      Send her to Whirlpool.

      • Or reddit

  • +40

    Do you really though? Plenty of kids available through adoption.

    • +7

      Surprised you're getting negged.

      Fact: There are about 50,000 children who are in and out of home care in Australia. 30,000 of those have been in that situation for more than two years and are unlikely to ever return to the permanent care of their biological family.

      Devastating, right? Yet according to Renee Carter, CEO of Adopt Change, adoption rates are at an all-time low. And we're not talking a couple of thousand. We're talking 278. 278 out of 50,000 children.

      • +3

        Don't you have 3/4 kids?

        • +54

          What did he do to the other quarter?!

          • @tshow: Lol. Maybe he could let us know.

          • +3

            @tshow: Swallowed.

            • +5

              @bobbified: I had a suspected case of pharyngitis while in Peru a while back. So I walked to a chemist and got some betadine gargle. The pharmacist kept saying "¡No lo tragues, lo escupes!" over and over to me while I was paying for it. I had no idea what he meant but just nodded anyway.
              I later found out it means: " Do not swallow; spit it out." Words to live by 😂

              • -1

                @DisabledUser102420: I don't want you talking to any girls I know! 😏

                • -2

                  @bobbified: My stay ended up being longer than originally planned.I learned spanish to keep myself entertained until my employer could get us out of there. I can tell any pretty spanish-speaking girls you meet whatever you want me to tell them. For example, "¿Crees que es apuesto? Pfffft! Francamente, señorita, creo que puedes hacer algo mejor." I'm the perfect wingman :p

                  • @DisabledUser102420: p.s: Look's like at least 2 spanish-speaking ozbargainers have read this. So, I'll admit it: I would make the worst wingman ever.

                    "¿Crees que es apuesto? Pfffft! Francamente, señorita, creo que puedes hacer algo mejor."

                    Translates to "You find him good-looking? Nah. Frankly, Miss, you can find better." Sorry @bobbified 😂

        • +31

          I have 3 biological kids (the eldest were a BOGOF) and 1 foster child. We are currently in the process of adopting her.

          • +1

            @DisabledUser102420: Doesn't the adoption process take years though? I knew a couple that got one kid after 10yrs and then aged out of being allowed before they got a second

            • @smashman42: It does .We started the process in June last year and we're nowhere near the end of it.

              • +1

                @DisabledUser102420: Why does it take so long?

                • +2

                  @serpserpserp: I like to think that all the red-tapism is to ensure they get it right- that it is indeed the best possible outcome for this child.

                  This article explains why the adoption process shouldn't be easy.

                  • @DisabledUser102420: Talk about adopted children, stories I heard about them shared by adoptive families weren't that good. Something to do with their biological parents' genes. Of course you can find counterexamples, but I guess they do have a point.

      • +11

        Have you ever known someone who has tried to go down that avenue? I’ve known several. It’s not simple. Yes lots of kids are in and out of care but the government here want to reunite kids to their biological parents regardless of whether that’s the best interest of the child.

        None of my friends (2 different couples and 1 single) who seriously perused this got anywhere close because of the lack of children actually up for permanent adoption. One couple were in the system for three years.

        • +1

          Yes, I know several. I have a friend who used to work for Barnados. My wife also started out working as a Child protection Officer for DHHS and have had a couple of her clients placed in foster care homes and then went on to be adopted.

        • +31

          @jjjaar: Came here to say something similar to this. My wife and I went down this avenue because we thought there were too many kids that needed a home. The foster system is broken and nearly unworkable. We know of people who foster out between 5 and 10 or so kids at a time and always have kids going though their home. They use these kids as a business, not as children.

          The system is almost impossible to get into and once you are in you get very little to no say in what happens. We were basically told we take who we are given, we don't get any choice and we don't know for how long. We were told that we would have to start out as emergency, short term housing and would later progress to longer terms as they saw fit.

          We basically gave up on the idea because of all the uncertainty of it and the fact that they were treating these kids like a commodity and not the human beings that they are. I can totally understand why a lot of these kids are broken. And the reason there is so many in the system is because they make it too hard and they are worth too much money to the "career" carers and to the agencies…

          I have seen animal shelters that are run better than what some of the foster care agencies I have seen. If there is 50,000 kids in the system, it's because they want it that way, not because people don't want to help.

        • +3

          adopt from an English speaking country abroad. Look up Dilkusha Home in Fiji - friends are in the process of adopting a child from there.

        • +19

          My wife and I looked into this also, we're vegetarian, at the time had a healthy 5yr old daughter ourselves and were looking to long term foster a baby. We live in Sydney, though my and wife's families are all in QLD, so each holiday we fly up to see them all.
          After 2 phone interviews, we weren't suitable as we needed to apply for permission every trip to QLD, and if the foster care agency or original parents said no, we'd have to leave the child in short term care here, or with the original parents. We also had to feed to child meat.

          What really hit home, like 6 months later there was a couple, homeless, who drown their baby saying she was evil, it came out child services were aware of the couple and decided to leave the baby with her parents because there weren't any alternatives.

          • +4

            @sacah: That's seriously [email protected]!

          • +3

            @sacah: Absolutely awful, but for some reason I am not surprised.

          • @sacah: There are good people like yourself then there are messed up system like those… This world is darker than fiction I says

      • -1

        BUT MUH PROGENY

      • +1

        Likely because a quick google shows you how difficult it is to adopt… Make it easier and more people will consider it. I understand the need for checks etc, however to me if someone wants to adopt…. they must really want a child. Can you even adopt as a single male?

    • +2

      People are obsessed with their own children or self-..

      • +2

        That's not entirely true. People who are very nurturing and caring are probably more ideal as being adopters. People who want to extend their blood line and think of it as a natural progression in life, would need some motivations, either the offspring looks similar to the, or they have similar traits. Dealing with your own biological kids is probably already hard, especially during the tough years they go through, people would put it out that well it's my blood and the personality is like me, but if they were to adopt, they would likely keep at the back of their minds that this kid is so not like me, or is more stubborn than me.

        All in all adoption is really suited for a people who really have a nurturing personality, otherwise it's just as bad as not adopting them.

        • You got a point, but they gotta remember that it is for the benefit of the child though, so keep emotion in control I guess…

        • +1

          I agree with this so much. Many research papers, and even the adoption websites themselves, describe the biological and psychological differences when raising an adopted child. It's written into our DNA and these child rearing traits have been recorded throughout our evolution.

          I hate these other ozbargainer commenters suggesting that people should adopt instead of conceive a child. They're shoving their shitty moral values down everyone else's throat. It's as stupid as telling someone to stop being Asian or Black or anything else that they cannot change or have any control over.

    • +2

      People want to start with a baby not an eight year old though.

      Not so many baby's available for adoption.

  • +22

    for a man in particular?

    I thought blokes didn't have a bio clock?

    • -6

      If this were true, men would be immortal.
      Logically, won’t there be more errors in cell mitosis and meiosis in the body as men grow older?
      Research paper

      • What?

        • +3

          I think hes pointing out that birth defects and issues are more likely the older/weaker your sperm is. not sure if his claim has any merit though.

          • +3

            @Kill Joy: They weed out the dodgey looking ones during IVF anyway.

          • +2

            @Kill Joy: I believe the rate of Down's syndrome at least is related to the father's age. Much more to the mother's age, but the father as well.

            • +1

              @Zephyrus: The claim definitely has merit.
              There are some issues associated with advanced paternal age, for example autism, schizophrenia, low birth weight, and increased risk of miscarriage.

    • +1

      Yes, male sperm increases in genetic errors with age. This is made a bigger problem as a women's assessment of sperm viability decreases in time. Result, less successful pregancies and increased rates of birth defects.

      If OP is serious he should do a health binge for a while to make sure the when he freezes the kids-to-be mid stroke they will be the superstars and not a poor batch.

  • +4

    I'd be interested myself for different reasons. I don't have any personal experience, but a quick Google search suggests:

    For sperm: $550 initial, $200 per 6 months after
    Eggs: $5000-7000 initial!!! $500 per year after.

    Damn, those eggs are expensive. And ongoing costs kinda suck. Not sure if these are what people actually end up paying and what deals exist (not sure it's something you'd want to cheap out on).

    • +8

      Surgery required to harvest eggs

    • +2

      I have frozen sperm and can confirm that costing is pretty spot on.

    • Had an embryo left after IVF that we kept frozen for a few years, these were the ballpark prices a decade ago when we got it done

    • It's a little more - consultation fees, follow up, etc.
      The operation to harvest eggs (whilst "easier" in the sense that more o&gs are performing it), is around 7-10k more like.

  • +1

    Just wondering anyone got any idea how expensive this is? for a man in particular?
    getting old, bio clock ticking and needing to extending chances of getting pregnant..

    I'm confused by this. Your query is about freezing a man's sperm but then asking about your chances of getting pregnant. Reminds me of the couple of cases I've heard about where people would refrigerate used condoms and later extract the semen and impregnant themselves using a turkey baster.Not saying that is what you're trying to do OP.

    To answer your question, the most expensive part is not storing the sperm/eggs but the IVF treatment itself.

    • JJB, I had to google to see what a turkey baster actually looks like.

      • +2

        Those were the only times I've heard of the turkey basters . I wonder if those basters were ever used for turkeys or if they were always secretly designed for spurgling.

        Fun fact: A 'spurglar' is someone who steals sperm . It is a portmanteau contraction of 'sperm' and ' 'burglar'.

        • +18

          And here I was thinking that “spurglar” was a contraction of “spurt” and “gurgler”.

          • @pegaxs: Ewwww!

          • @pegaxs: It can be both all at once!

        • +7

          Those were the only times I've heard of the turkey basters . I wonder if those basters were ever used for turkeys or if they were always secretly designed for spurgling.

          We had a turkey baster in our house when I was very young, I remember playing with it when I was maybe 3 or 4. You have just ruined my childhood :(

          • +1

            @onetwothreefour: I've just asked my wife if she knows what a turkey basker is. She said, " it's like a bigger version of a baby snot sucker, isn't it?" 😂

            How did those roast turkeys taste like?

      • +1

        😂😂

    • Those costs are outrageous. Check this place instead, used to be called primary IVF:
      https://www.adorafertility.com.au/treatments/costs/

      • +2

        Why not get some test tubes, sterilise them, and then store your spooge and eggs in your own refrigeration setup? A quality bar fridge might do. Surely it only needs to be well frozen, so as long as you make sure it's on a decent UPS you should be right, no?

        • +3

          just store it in the freezer of coles or woolworths near a product with low sales. Save money like a true ozbargainer

  • +3

    Blokes can knock up women into their 90s. No need to worry about them. Although these cases might be the exception rather than the rule. Also quality of sperm declines with age.

    • +1

      It seems to be a common phenomenon with the Rolling Stones membership.

    • Didn't Bernie Ecclestone just knock someone up at the ripe old age of 89 recently?

  • +6

    You might be able to find a deal on the back of a shopping receipt

  • seriously, please contact and IVF clinic, and don't go for the cheapest contact one with a decent reputation, you get what you pay for.

    • +5

      I don't know about that. We went and saw the most respected specialist in our city (long waiting list) and he both failed to diagnose endo in my wife, and told us we wouldn't conceive naturally. First round of IVF didn't take and we conceived naturally before the second. Now my wife is 36 weeks along with our second - also natural.

      I get the impression that fertility treatment is pretty formulaic, they have a script and they follow it.

  • +11

    You don't need this.

    Just keep fit and healthy and barring medical conditions that impact sperm production you should be OK.

    The hardest part is finding a woman that won't take you for half once it's done.

  • +1

    Careful. Twins is hard work. IVF can result in twins or more! Our twins were thankfully free.

    • +7

      I bet they're not free, will cost you a small fortune by the time they leave home.

      • Fair point

    • Depends on how they do it - like if you're old or the woman loses embryos easily they implant multiple in the hope one sticks, hence multiple births, but if the woman is younger or if the bloke is the one with the dodgy sperm, they may only implant one

      • +1

        They rarely do multiples anymore. They're trying to reduce the incidence of twins.

  • +1

    In 2015 I paid $500 for an additional 5 years of storage.
    Westmead IVF
    (02) 9845 7484

    Appears to be renamed
    https://www.westmeadfertilitycentre.com.au/

  • +2

    My flatmate keeps his in a my little pony jar in the fridge.

    • +1

      One of the 'patients' my wife met during her clinical placement used to mix it with his weetbix and milk and slurp it for breakfast. He believed that his semen contained holistic, metaphysical powers - a sort of self-propagating Elixir of Life and he didn't want to waste even a single drop of it.

      • +2

        Tell your wife I said hi.

        It's been a while!

      • +3

        I feel sick.

        • +1

          From what she said, that was just one of his "quirks" and not the reason he was there.

          • +1

            @DisabledUser102420: Stop making me re read your post. For the love of all that is holy.

            • +1

              @DisabledUser228397: Then I won't tell you about the one who performed an extreme form of circumcision on himself…

              • @DisabledUser102420: Dorsal Slit-Sleeve Technique?

                • +2

                  @voteyes: The ice and steak knife technique.Let's just say, he pees like a girl now.

  • +1

    Wah? "Eggs/Sperm"

    You can either be one or the other……

    • +2

      Hybrid?

      • +2

        Biology doesn't count nowadays.

  • How do you know you can't have kids have you tried, oh wait I didn't read it properly.

    Oh well gone.

  • +1

    How old are you?

    Do you want to have children with an Australian citizen or a foreign woman?

  • How old should one start thinking about this?

    • +1

      30s

      • I would not bother. Since you will go with IVF anyway, the doctors can extract the DNS from the sperm at any time, and I don't think that's the expensive part of the process. For women it's a bit different. P.M. me if you need more information about IVF.

    • +5

      PM Boris is 55 years old and got a child … yesterday?

      Age is an issue for women, the "ticking clock", the body clock.
      Not so much for males; my neighbor is 79 years old, German background and got his 38 years old Asian wife pregnant twice already.

      It is an issue of health and genetics and NOT age alone (for males that is)