Why Are Dogs So Expensive? Where Are All The X Breeds?

My partner and I have wanted to get a dog for some years but never been in a position to do so. We are now and dogs are crazy expensive!

I get that covid has tightened demand but really $4000 for a dog… I believe this was an issue before 2020 from what I've read.

Also, where are all the X breeds? Why all purebred's?

We had a few dogs growing up, German, Lab X and Jack Russell over the years. Even with inflation they should be maybe $600-$700 now days?

Seems exploitative with the insane prices, breeders just want big $ and if they can't get the puppy sold, ppl don't want older dogs, so do they just dump them?

Happy to pay up to* $1000 but all I see on gumtree/trading post is $8000 purebred's.

Give me any all old mongrel and it will live like purebred royalty! (Prefer Lab ;-)

Cheers

UPDATE* So after my whinging post we managed to find a local farmer that had his female boarder collie fall pregnant. A little of 10! $500 boarder collie cross, golden retriever I believe. Total cutie. Smallest "runt" of the lot but so worth it. He had people come from Melbourne, Brisbane and Sydney to little old Casino at the drop of a pin. Mental. He couldn't believe the response he had.

Maybe a new post is needed but: What are people's thoughts on so called Runts' of the litter?

From what I have read vets and the like have dispelled alot of myths and tbats it is just a pup that was latched to the placenta where they had slightly less access to nutrients and come out smaller.

If they come out with birth defects they've had a really bad "connection" or supply. They say in the wild the mother would neglect, but dometicate most of the negatives can be over come. I.e. access to food from competing siblings. The owner said they did loose one maybe that was the runt, so maybe she's just smaller.

He used to breed purebreads collies and golden retrievers and said her mother was, but it makes no difference to us. She's full of beans and already crazy conscious and alert to commands and our body language.

Thanks to everyone help!

Comments

  • +135 votes

    Go to your local pound / RSPCA. There are many many many dogs there, that will love you til the day they die, regardless of their 'cost'.

    • -48 votes

      Most of those shelter dogs are high energy / bully breeds. Even then, lots of people are adopting and not understanding those dog needs. I already got bitten by a staffy. Careless owners are out there.

      • +14 votes

        hahah bull, i have pedigree english staffy and they are not full of energy, they sleep then sleep some more, eat chase ball play with toy for 2 minutes, chew on antler , sleep ,sleep then repeat.
        also she wouldnt have a clue what biting is, she was taught from a pup not to nip.
        i really dont like people with the belief that bully breeds are dangerous.
        stick the brain of a stupid yappy little dog in a bully then they would be dangerous.

        • +11 votes

          Can vouch. Friends rescue staffy is super excited to meet me when I come visit. Must bring a toy to come meet me at the door. The sits between my feet and demands scratches for about 2 minutes before she goes back to sleep.

        • +9 votes

          English staffies are just love nuggets encased in muscle and saliva.

          • +1 vote

            @thanatos350: American staffys are less sleepy from the ones I have met, English are snooze balls in my experience

        •  

          i really dont like people with the belief that bully breeds are dangerous.

          Perhaps you should reserve your dislike for whoever chose to brand that breed as the "bully" breed. Are they not the ones to blame for giving those dogs such a bad name (literally!) ?

          •  

            @cloclo: nope, ts the people that jump on the band wagon and just blame the breed without knowing what they are talking about.
            Grate Danes are a bully breeds but you dont hear people talking about them as a bully so it comes down to individual knowledge not the people that brand the dogs as a bully breed.

      • +10 votes

        You’re right, people down downvote because they’re uneducated or like to deny reality, but the VAST majority of dog bites and fatalities are from bully breeds like staffies. People overcompensate and go crazy because their particular dog hasn’t eaten a child (yet), but the statistics do not lie. The chances are even worse if you’re picking it up from a shelter where it has been abused, or abandoned due to its aggressive nature. There are endless stories of people who bought into the “nanny dog” meme, where it ends in children getting bitten and it’s always the same. “He was fine for years and then one day he just snapped!”. It’s very tragic and I wouldn’t risk having a dog with an unknown background in my house around my young children. Not a chance.

        •  

          absolute rubbish
          australian cattle dogs, german shepherds labradors huskys and bully breeds are all as dangerous as eachother
          depends on how they are raised nothing else. its just people love to bag the bully breeds as they are ignorant

    • +26 votes

      Mongrels are generally healthier too!

      There's a reason most cultures frown upon marrying your cousin.

      • +9 votes

        That's not true.
        It takes hundreds of years of careful breeding to get a recessed chin, buck teeth, and a snout-like nose like The Royal Family. I mean, it's a rare breed. They should be, like, cherished and stuff.

        (props to whomever gets that reference)

        •  

          It takes hundreds of years of careful breeding to get a recessed chin, buck teeth, and a snout-like nose like The Royal Family.

          Out of curiosity, who specifically are you referring to? Both Queen Elizabeth and Princess Margaret were renowned beauties in their younger years. Even Prince Charles wasn't too hard on the eyes when he was a young lad. And don't get me started on Swedish Prince Carl , he's dayum!

    •  

      Apparently, they're empty?

    •  

      Perhaps they want a dog they can raise, bond with, build memories with, and know its background and be more confident it’s not going to their their young children? There’s absolutely NOTHING wrong with buying from breeders who do it properly. Look for registered breeders and buy from reputable ones. You don’t have to feel guilty for wanting a puppy you can raise and bond with for life.

  • +52 votes

    #adoptdontshop.

    My rescue Jack Russell was my best mate for a dozen years and still miss her daily. Pets Haven is the main animal shelter we donate to, but also try Homeless Hounds animal rescue, RSPCA, plenty more.

    • +11 votes

      Cannot agree more.
      Please don't encourage those breeding factories.

    • +1 vote

      This isn’t the only option. There are fantastic breeders out there who look after the dogs, have great conditions and aren’t even close to puppy farms. Support these breeders. Do your research and buy from reputable breeders, even if it’s a bit more expensive. Go check out where they breed them and then choose whether or not you’ll buy from them. If they don’t allow visits then obviously don’t buy from them. There is absolutely nothing wrong with buying a puppy, don’t let people guilt you into buying a dog from a shelter that you are not prepared for.

  • +28 votes

    Rescue a dog. 2 of our 3 dogs are rescue and they know when they get to their forever home. Their loyalty and love is almost sickening.

  • +1 vote

    We're happy to adopt, I've just had a look at local northern NSW centres, some have stopped adopting "till first quarter 2021" not sure if that's covid related.

    There were some beautiful dogs on the one other adopt site, but they were big boys - mastif, or very old fellas. We don't need a puppy but a younger dog would suit our family more, we have a baby on the way and would feel more comfortable with knowing their temperament. Happy to home 6 month to 1 year-ish.

    I'll keep an eye out on the sites. Cheers

    • +28 votes

      Greyhounds are fantastic lazy couch potatoes.

      • +3 votes

        One issue with greyhounds is some can be a problem with other pets because of their training to chase a lure. It can take some work to acclimate them to your other furry family members and of course if you have feathered pets you should never mix your fur and feathered friends anyway because sooner or later animal instinct can kick in and you have a dead bird.

        • +18 votes

          Or a dead dog if you have a Cassowary…

      • +2 votes

        My brother has 2 and fosters another one while they await adoption.

        They are like absolutely massive, gigantic cats. They sleep all day, they want to do nothing but be in your lap or curled up to you in bed.All they need is a quick walk around the block a few times a week and they are done. Such an easy breed to care for.

      • +3 votes

        I have a greyhound and can't recommend them enough. As Cyphar mentioned, they're basically massive cats. They don't need a lot of exercise, 20 to 30 minutes a day is usually enough.

        A couple of downsides, they'll want to chase anything that's moving in the opposite direction including cats, children, shadows and trains. There are exceptions and some more extreme than others but the urge to chase is fairly ingrained. This is fine at home, in the yard, but it means they always have to be on the lead outside of the house. I've had mine do a runner twice while opening the gate and she's faster… so that's a thing. When they're chasing they're pretty much oblivious to everything around them like cars, fences, ditches and your voice. This means taking the dog camping has been a non-starter for us.

        The other thing is they don't like sharing their bed so no sleeping on your bed, or you'll end up being growled at. Again, this is a general rule with some exceptions, but definitely was our experience when she decided she'd try to take over one of the kids' beds. It's no big deal, you just have to be consistent and don't give into those big sad eyes.

        Other than that, they're just super easy and really affectionate. They love being around people and are happy to lay in their spot while you do you thing.

        • +1 vote

          Agreed with your comments about chasing.

          Disagree with the growling. We can't get our hound off the f'ing bed and it's us that growl as he tries to bury his wet cold nose into our dry warm bits !

          But, all dogs are different.

    • +5 votes

      You'll find everyone wants what you want though. It's always the older or bigger ones that are left waiting sadfaced while the cute puppies barely make it through the cage door before they're instantly snapped up by those put off by breeders' fees. It's a shame because yes younger dogs are easier to train but younger doesn't mean better temperament, it's the luck of the draw and depends on each dog's character.
      Good luck on your search.

    • +1 vote

      Try Petrescue.com.au. There are plenty of groups as well. Good luck

      •  

        Agree, pet rescue has all types, ages and breeds.

      • +1 vote

        They seem to have lots of dingos!

    •  

      There are some breed specific rescue groups that do fostering and adoption eg Labrador rescue that have Facebook groups. If you sign up with local animal welfare groups as a foster cater you can also sometimes foster to adopt, which gives you a chance to see if the you and the dog work well together.

    • +4 votes

      Hi,

      I am a locum vet, working Sunshine Coast this week, will be in Bangalow end of January. My mother (87yo, early dementia) has a 4yo spayed female pug she is looking to rehome. She bought it from a breeder in Warwick two months ago. I've checked it out it's fine, just too energetic for little old lady. If you're interested, write back or text 0477451616. Cheers, aarn

      • +3 votes

        A pug with no issues, sounds fishy.

        • +13 votes

          Isn’t messed up breathing a feature and not an issue?

  • +15 votes

    Gumtree advertisers usually scammers - pure breds should only be bought from
    REGISTERED breeders - www.dogzonline.com.au

    I have 2 rescue rotties - beautiful well behaved dogs

    If have specific breed in mind many great rescue groups on Facebook

  • +2 votes

    Go to a breed-specific rescue e.g. https://www.labrescue.com.au
    Be prepared for them to want to send someone to your house to check your backyard is fenced, etc; or to ask for photos.
    The stricter ones put you on a list then call you when they think they have a dog that fits you

  •  

    Yeah I might need to get my partner to look on social media, she has Facebook and Instagram.

    Just looked on RSPCA site and their no dogs anywhere near Lismore/Northern Rivers region.

    Which I suppose* is a good thing… :-(

  • +1 vote

    Same with everything. Supply and demand, and people will pay the prices, so why not. Get a rescue puppy or similar.

    • +2 votes

      Getting a rescue puppy is like winning the lotto at the moment, and I don’t play lotto. Pretty much no shelters have puppies.

      •  

        Strange. Must admit I haven't looked recently.

        •  

          I just looked for a rescue, there aren't any family friendly in my area so I searched QLD RSPCA (only a few hours drive). Almost exclusively there 90% bull Arab, America bull, mastif.

          Check it out, only saw 1 or 2 different breeds. Are these more muscular staunch looking dogs getting bought by young men and then giving up on them? Or are all the other dog breeds getting adopted and Bull-ish breeds not?

          • +6 votes

            @Goremans: Probably a mix of both. Would you consider a greyhound?

            Regarding prices, I personally think high prices for dogs is a good thing, stops people impulse buying them.

            •  

              @brendanm: I disagree about high prices being good. Pensioners/widowers can’t afford many thousands of dollars for small cross breeds that are their only regular companions.

              • +5 votes

                @mapax: Except affordibility is something all potential pet owners should consider carefully before bringing one into their lives; it's just like having kids. If the "price tag" seems too high, what about vet bills that could potentially run into the thousands, sometimes tens of thousands if unlucky? Cheap prices definitely play a role in impulse purchases and a higher entry point may encourage people to think long and hard about whether they could afford $5,000 if their pet gets sick or hurt.

          •  

            @Goremans: Bull arabs are great dogs if you have the room. Don’t fall for the memes by cowards and pearl clutchers that claim they’re aggressive dogs. They were bred to be docile around humans and livestock, but be effective on feral pigs. I would avoid mature ones though unless you know where they came from as a lot of wannabe tough guys get them and ruin them.

            There is a chance that wanna be tough guys get disappointed when the bull arabs are giant teddy bears. There is also a chance they were purchased as pig dogs but they’re not good on the pigs, much like greyhounds that aren’t runners get put up for adoption.

  • +6 votes

    I looked for a dog 3 years ago…every dog, even the undesirable ones were going for $1000 each on FB/Gumtree…I think even my local pet rescue charge $800 a dog to adopt! I think its insane considering when I was growing up if a dog cost $300-400, you would expect it to have papers!
    People even wanted $2500 for a Maltese! Pffft…of course I joined the party and paid $3500 but my wife wanted what she wanted and I was simply there to hand over my wallet :( I'm sure u can guess what I got…
    Anyway COV-ID hasn't changed it…this is how it is.. they will argue that its the cost of vet bills( shots, vaccination etc) but really its just a huge money making scheme..

    • +2 votes

      The prices online are ridiculous.

      I just looked for a rescue, there aren't any family friendly in my area so I searched QLD RSPCA (only a few hours drive). Almost exclusively there 90% bull Arab, America bull, mastif.

      Check it out, only saw 1 or 2 different breeds. Are these more muscular staunch looking dogs getting bought by young men and then giving up on them? Or are all the other dog breeds getting adopted and Bull-ish breeds not?

      Dog…wealthy mans best friend.

      • +1 vote

        These are the dogs that scummy people buy. Dole bludgers and people on welfare, government housing etc….you could check all pounds around Australia and its always the same. Need i say more…

        •  

          That's shitty. Rather than the average cost going up, Gov/RSPCA/#someone should target that demographic with marketing to not buy dogs they can't support.

          Eeh, crazy I can't buy a dog for my family. Weird world.

          Just got a reply from a breeder for a Lab. I was curious lol

          "Hi Ryan, thank you for your enquiry. I currently have black males available for their forever homes on the 12th February. Puppies are purebred pedigree papered with Dogs Queensland and are sold on the limited registration (not for showing or breeding) puppies are $4800 inc gst. With $1000 deposit to secure a puppy. Thanks"

          Where are the non-petergree Labradors? Or simply the dogs we all grew up with? Dare I say a "normal dog"…you know sub$1000

          • +2 votes

            @Goremans: “Not for showing or breeding” lol… yeah yeah, no problem, but no longer worth $4,800.

            Breeders are such arrogant arseholes sometimes.

          • +1 vote

            @Goremans: My pure bread golden retriever was around $3k. With dogs like labs, you want to make sure they have hip scores done. I don’t know if you could buy a pure bread dog for much less than $1k. Also the limited register is pretty normal.

            One thing you could do is try dogzonline and you can search for older dogs.

            Also +1 to looking at the pound

      •  

        Yup, we looked QLD RSPCA for a good 6 months looking for a small indoor dog. We ended up finding a breeder in northern NSW and got a Maltese instead.

    •  

      I paid $2500 each for my Shih Tzus in 2017 and 2018.

      However, I went down the gumtree route in 2008 for my wife's first Shih Tzu (he's still alive) and after that experience, I'd decided I'll deal with a registered breeder next time around.

      I have nothing against rescues. I'm open to it but I need a dog suited to our lifestyle (low energy, easy going, homebody) and it's not a staffy, a bull arab or any big dog to be honest.

  •  

    We bought our purebred Labrador 20 years ago for $800, and we got another one 4 years ago at a steal for $1200 through a breeder who knew we weren’t planning to show her. Purebred dogs are expensive.

    Personally, I prefer to go to the shelters, but my husband wants labradors from good stock, blah blah blah.

    • +1 vote

      The only dogs for adoption in all QLD are bull-arab, American staffs etc.

      • +1 vote

        Here you go:
        https://www.petrescue.com.au/listings/search?name=&species_c...

        That should cover dogs up for adoption from Lower QLD/Upper NSW. Most pets seem to require ~$300 for adoption costs. There are some young/puppies, most dogs seem to be 2-4 years old. There's an even split when it comes to gender, some small/large dogs though mostly medium sized, and different mixes or breeds in there. Stay away from pedigree/breeders as most are unethical or simply profit making businesses.

  • +2 votes

    Just be super careful - lots of scams - both with puppys and dogs that don't exist, and with people selling dogs that shouldnt be sold (ie not bred properly or with significant genetic issues - they are doing this as they see it as a gold mine due to the high demand and poor regulation).

  • +1 vote

    I like the people that just make up their own breeds for their mongrels that got impregnated by the neighbours bitsa dog that jumped the fence one night and then slapping a $5,000 price tag on the puppies…

    "Do you have any puppies for sale? Can I ask what breed the puppies are?"
    "Yes, of course, they are purebred Border Spadoodleweiler Sheppard Retreivers…"
    "Riiiiiiiight…"

    •  

      Border Spadoodleweiler Sheppard Retreivers

      I just Googled that. Did you make that up? 😉

      • +3 votes

        No, it’s real, I swear… a great dog for hipsters… they can get one before Google knows about it…

    • -2 votes

      Anythning ending in ooodle is a scam to suck in stupid people

  •  

    Sounds like you have no Rescue shelters near you? Because you really need to go in, rather than looking online, but if too far away then I guess that is hard.
    I am lucky enough to live 5 min drive from an RSPCA in SA and we went in and adopted a dog the first visit, she is a bully/staffy/who knows but she is the softest dog going around, unless you are the postman.
    We have had 2 children since, a 4 and 2yr old now, and the dog certainly knows its place, haha.
    Edit: Cost approx. $300.
    Age: 6-12months.
    When: 7 years ago.

  • +3 votes

    Get yourself down to the pound and pick up a bitsa for a couple hundy. Spending $4,000 - $8,000 on a dog as pet is pure madness.

    •  

      I agree but have you ever seen a baby pug? People will pay the asking price if they really want it and that's no different than buying other overpriced things

  • -1 vote

    $8k is really an exaggeration for a purebred.
    And there are plenty of cross breeds for $4-$6k.

    •  

      Why is a cross breed so expensive? I thought breeding was usually a side business. What does it cost to breed a dog and how much is profit?

    •  

      I know someone who just paid $10,000 for a cavoodle. Was supposed to be $6500, but when they went to pick it up the price had gone up sure to demand.

      We seem to be in a bit of a bubble for everything at the moment. No doubt they'll drop back down to sensible levels again soon.

      •  

        Cavoodle is a crossbreed.

        •  

          Designer breed now

  •  

    Takes time to bake puppies. And you may find the runt of the litter cheaper but there will be a reason why that one doesn't sell as much. You'll probably be happy with any dog though so you should go to the pound to have a look first. If I were buying a dog I'd want a funny looking one so I might need to pay.

    • -1 vote

      'Takes time to bake puppies'
      Not sure this is quite what OP has in mind…

  • +4 votes

    I was lucky and my son picked up a Shorty Jack for free (4 weeks old). She is a fantastic dog, 1 year old now.

    No way in the world would i pay what people are asking, dogs are free or $200 at most. Go and get a greyhound for free.

    •  

      I agree. We have two Maltese shitzu's. One was a rehome from someone that couldn't keep a dog anymore, then I heard they bought a teacup poodle…. The other was from a breeder, but was a gift to my wife from her parents. So both free, from my perspective.

  • +6 votes

    Paid $50 for my mutt that lasted 16 years. Was the best buy.

    I cringe when I see people paying $1000+ for a dog breed that's basically animal abuse.

    • +2 votes

      My first kelpie cost me $10 from a local farmer out of town and she lived to be 19. My second Kelpie cost me $90, again, from a farmer, and she lived to be 16.

      My neighbours bought a French Bulldog 6 years ago for $8,000 and it had to be euthanised last week…

      •  

        One of my mates bought a kelpie from a farmer last year just before the covids hit. It was $7000, however both the dog and bitch are top tier working dogs. Supposedly if it’s not a performer by a certain age there will be a 50% refund, last I heard is it’s doing very well and there will be no refund request.

        • +5 votes

          Working dogs I can understand. They are a tool, like a tractor or a farm bike, they are not pets in that respect. There is a lot of training involved into getting to a working standard. Time and money…

          My last kelpie I bought about 5 years ago for $300 and partly trained myself I ended up selling for $2,500 and is now a fully fledged working dog on a local farm.

          Paying $8,000 for a noisey breathing, crippled walking, constant vet visiting, slobber flicking, drooling dumb arse French Bulldog is stupid.

      •  

        I got my Kelpie cross from a farmer for $40. She's 13, she was the runt of the litter. Wouldn't trade her for an $8000 dog, she's perfect (I may be slightly biased).

  • +3 votes

    There are no cross breeds anymore. They are all designer dogs that cost more than pure breeds.

    Prices have doubled / tripled since COVID and WFH. As a result there are a lot of shonky breeders out there trying to make a quick buck.

  • +2 votes

    Also, where are all the X breeds?

    Shelters

    We're happy to adopt, I've just had a look at local northern NSW centres, some have stopped adopting "till first quarter 2021" not sure if that's covid related.

    It's 100% Covid-related. People stuck at home lonely and bored, with Bali money burning a hole in their pocket.

    Where are the non-petergree (sic) Labradors? Or simply the dogs we all grew up with? Dare I say a "normal dog"…you know sub$1000

    They're still sold from breeders, just unregistered ones, often on Gumtree, FB, etc., these days still expect $$$ for a purebred dog.

    The only dogs for adoption in all QLD are bull-arab, American staffs etc.

    Shelter dogs are all surrendered or the result of accidental matings, and bogans who don't tend to desex, tend to own bull arabs and staffies.

  •  

    I guess one way of looking at it is if you have the money then $3000-4000 over hopefully 12-15 years is not a bad investment.
    I would also say the peace of mind that comes with a purebred or a multigenerational crossbreed's known temperament with young children is worth something.
    Also, characteristics like non-shedding coats are amazing with kids because there's enough housework as it is!
    Might be worth looking into 'guardian' programs with breeders too where you don't pay for your dog but have it at home with you and it has a couple of litters for the breeder before it officially becomes yours after 2-3 years.
    We looked for ages at the RSPCA in Melbourne but couldn't find suitable dogs so we ended up getting a Labradoodle under a guardian program at a breeder.
    Beautiful dog in every way :)
    Good luck!

  • -1 vote

    OP this might a little out of the way for you, but here's a local shelter/rescue group in Hunter region:

    https://www.hunteranimalrescue.com.au/

    no, no dogs are available at the moment.

    anyway, I hope there would be a mass dumping of pets once COVID is over and people are required to go back to their offices………

    edit: looks like a few dogs are available at Newcastle's RSPCA as well

    • +5 votes

      I hope there would be a mass dumping of pets once COVID is over and people are required to go back to their offices………

      Why would you 'hope' for this? Shelters would get slammed, more animals would need to be rehomed, a lot more won't and will be put down. It's bad enough we have a generation of maladjusted covid dog after the closure of puppy schools.

      •  

        opps I meant "I hope there WON'T be massing dumping" :)

  •  

    Our 6 year old CAV cost us $950 from a small breeder, friend of my daughters, his dad died but still gets run into his mother occasionally lol. Our other CAV that died in March was 13 and was $595 from a pet shop.
    No way I would pay $4-8k they are asking now, people are just stupid.

  • +1 vote

    Re your question Where are all the cross breeds? Why all pure breds?
    Don't know for sure - but I wonder if it's like cat breeders, where the regulatory bodies are cracking down on sales of undesexed kittens, and local councils charge a lot more to register entire animals than speys / neuters. If so, it has a trickle-down effect; if your Labrador Trixie is desexed then there's no chance of impregnation by the local poodle / indeterminate breed, hence no x breed pups.

    I've been looking for a British Bulldog but absolutely refuse to pay $5000 for a pup with an expected life span of 8 -10 years. So I guess I'm back to my original choice of a rescue greyhound.

    • +2 votes

      I have got a rescue greyhound dog called Ryan. Have him on a two-week trial which ends on Tuesday. He's going nowhere!! Greyhounds are very little trouble, lazyish - Zorsted - like lots of rests. Early days for me, but no regrets and surprised how easy he is to live with. Cost $395. Lots of support available too.

      • +2 votes

        I was fostering greyhounds. It is so rewarding. It is life a toddler discovering something new everyday. Are you going to get into fostering? It's great when they come out of racing and have another one help them navigate their new big world

        • +1 vote

          I don't know, it's early days yet. I usually have two dogs, but will start slowly and see what happens.

          •  

            @suzley: Just foster. You don't need to adopt all of them :P Yeah might cost you a bit will the extra food. Keep it in mind for later down the track

  • +2 votes

    Stop buying from breeders, then the prices will fall and eventually breeders will fall too

    •  

      I know a few friends that are convinced they have 'rescue' dogs. They can't be convinced otherwise despite the fact they went to a farm and paid top dollar to chose their favourite out of a litter of deliberately bred dogs. Breeders will unfortunately always find a way and the pounds will always be full :(

  • +1 vote

    People thought they felt connect to other people through social media. Hitting a like button on FB doesn't make you have a real connection like talking or face to face with someone. Maybe people really are lonely.

    I've been FB clean for 1.5 years now. Never been happier. I actually have to make the effort to speak to people to see what is happening in their lives.

    • +2 votes

      Random comment there but that's great! I've been off anti-$ocial media for about 6 years now and I feel the same way. It has it's benefits for keeping in contact with distant ppl, but even email can do that. When I see someone or bump into them and ask what have they been up to, it's genuine, I really don't know and I want to know. Rather than having been trickled curated photos of their activities.

      • +1 vote

        Yeah I totally agree. I like having a genuine real interest in peoples lives too rather than what they portrait online. Most of the time stuff didn't come up in your news feed due to the amalgarythems.
        When I went off FB I had my sister and ex boyfriend ask me if I had blocked them. By then I'd been off for months. No one really noticed I wasn't there anymore. I had over 700 'friends'. No one remembers my birthday any more either lol

  • +2 votes

    Where are all of the cross breeds? Hell they all seem to be these days. Designer dogs are everywhere. Only thing is they seem to have names that people think are genuine like cavoodle or labradoodle for Christ’s sake. Then there is the French Bulldog with all of ITS genetic problems. Stick to a breed that has a history of not having inbreeding issues - even with the pound mixed breed pooch. Dogs are not a status symbol they are a member of the family. They need a lot of work and mental stimulation and a long term commitment. Do your homework (and this is a start by coming here) and think hard before you take on such a huge responsibility. Spend time with somebody else’s dog in your home or from a rescue before you make the final choice if you can. It doesn’t always work out like the fairytale some hope for which is why so many rescues are out there. Ok I ranted a bit, not necessarily aimed at the OP btw. Have a nice day anyway.

  •  

    We just picked up our foxy pup last Wednesday, from a local family on FB. My first "new" dog
    We have always adopted dogs in the past, the most beautiful one we ever had was a 5yr+ rotti X from the RSPCA. The poor guy was raised by an old lady who ended up going into a home (or at least that's what they told us…) She obviously spent 24/7 with Jim and he had the most beautiful temperament.
    We got a 50% discount as no-one wanted an older large breed but they people couldn't bring themselves to put him down. BUT when you take on a dog you take on their quirks, and Jim was terrified of storms. He would run off and be gone for days, in the end it's that fear of storms which lead to his death.
    Our current dog was free off a guy on FB who was moving to a live-in winery job and couldn't take him. Diesel is a mixed breed and I got him at 18months. wife was pregnant at the time and a major positive was that he is great with small kids. BUT he has been trained poorly, loves to run off and explore even though he is desexed. The previous owner would chase him over fences etc for hours and it's now his favourite "game".
    Great cuddler and very sweet dog but has to be on a run or a lead at all times, which sucks but it's better than getting run over or drowned by a roo…
    So yeah dogs are all different and be aware that if you aren't there for the first few months they are likely to have been trained "wrong".

    The new pups seller let us regularly visit their house, loved the parents and pups (not a puppy farmer) and has even taught the pup its name already. Now it's up to us to put in the work and not screw it up!
    Oh and Rosie was $600 Inc jabs and chip

    Ps-where are all the cross breeds? Bogans figured out that "Labradoodle" and "cavoodle" sound better than mongrel and now charge a fortune for them 😉