• expired

Philips Original Pasta & Noodle Maker $209.99 Delivered @ Costco (Membership Required)

200

Making delicious fresh pasta has never been easier. You just add ingredients, it does the rest. With its simple assembly and hassle-free clean-up; it is the ideal tool for individuals looking to experiment and enjoy making pasta at home.

Related Stores

Costco Wholesale
Costco Wholesale

closed Comments

  •  

    Anyone actually tried this? Is it worht it?

    • +11 votes

      Bought one a while back and used it heaps for a while, but like most kitchen gadgets it got a bit much and hasn't seen a heap of use since.

      Pasta is easy, miles better than normal packet pasta, but not quite as good as proper hand made pasta either (much much less work though).

      Biggest issues is that it's kind of just a pain to clean, but that would really be the same on any similar kind of machine. Not that there was anything inherently wrong with this design, it's just the nature of the product.

      do follow recipies - to the gram.

      • +2 votes

        Trick is to let everything dry overnight before cleaning, it will come off much easier than wash right after using.

    •  

      What I like is if you have eggs, flour and water you have fresh pasta. It really is easy to use. Cleaning is a touch of a pain but not too bad.

      You usually end up with some leftover dough which I finish off with my hand machine.

    • +3 votes

      I bought this product 5 years ago, and still use it once a week for making pasta or Udon noodle.
      I tried to make ramen noodle and soba noodle, but not very nice.

      clean might be a bit pain for some people, but remember authentic pasta machine cannot be washed in water.

      •  

        What are they supposed to get washed in if not water?

        • +1 vote

          You don't really need to wash it. You just use a dry brush and brush away any excess flour. That's what the instructions say on my mercato.

          •  

            @richy_o: I don’t wash my Mercato, either. Brush and a damp cloth, if necessary,

  • +3 votes

    From what I've read from multiple machines (not necessarily this one) is that they don't do anything better than the hand turn ones at a tenth of the price.
    If you have ever made pasta/dough, you would know that it's actually not that hard, and cleaning up something like this would probably make it even harder ;)
    Also keep in mind a good dough is made by hand or a decent mixer..
    .
    Have you ever made pasta, noodles, etc… ? If not, this machine ain't going to make you do it ").

  •  

    Pasta is like $1. Why make it? Does it taste that much better?

    • +7 votes

      I dont use a machine but i hand make my pasta. Tastes better for most dishes and has a different bite to it. Allows you to create different styles and incorporate different elements into your pasta.

    •  

      Yes. You can buy pre made fresh as well

    • +9 votes

      Freshly made is no comparison to dried stuff and still miles ahead of the "fresh" stuff you get from the supermarket fridge like Latina.

      • +1 vote

        if there are any lazy fresh pasta fans in Adelaide, would recommend Marino's pasta (and especially their gnocchi) at the markets.

        beats anything I've managed to pull off at home.

    • +3 votes

      It's definitely not about saving money

    • +1 vote

      I do love my dried pasta, but freshly made stuff is truly on another level. Better than the fancy dried stuff that costs you 8 bucks a packet.

      I don't have a roller or cutter, so I tend to just cut pappardelle with a knife. Not a huge pappardelle fan though, so its not something I do often lol.

      difficulty-wise its on a similar level to making scones.

      for a classic aussie spag bol stick to your dried stuff, but if you want to try the simple classics like Cacio e Pepe, fresh pasta is basically required to make it viable.

  • +1 vote

    I have the smaller version. It makes noodles fine, but as mattman said above, it doesn't make noodles as good as proper hand made noodles. This is because it doesn't knead the noodles for all that long. It only extrudes really low hydration dough (talking about really flaky and dry dough) and so it doesn't get a chance to mix it properly to form gluten bonds to make the noodles chewier. As soon as the dough gets even just a little bit 'dough like', it then sticks to the mixer and won't extrude well. The noodles it makes tends to be a bit mushier because of this lack of mixing.

  •  

    cleaning takes 2 minutes. i let the dough leftovers to dry in the machine for 2 days, then it all falls out, just takes a wet paper towel to clean a bit of flour and a quick wash or dishwasher cycle to clean the lid which will have egg remnants

  •  

    To think that top of the range was cheaper than this https://www.ozbargain.com.au/node/472046

    • +1 vote

      I don't think there is a range with these anymore - that's the old model (with auto weigh) when there was two versions. The one in this sale is the latest version, and the only one available in Australia.

      $209 for these is great price. JB current has it for $339. If anyone is waiting for a lower price, I personally wouldn't risk waiting a long time for that. I thought I got a good deal getting one for around $240 after watching it for months.

      •  

        JB current was always high 😉

        Might be good idea to look at eBay and gumtree. They pop up from time to time. It seems Philips downgraded it for Australia. There is even less shaping discs.

        •  

          Yeah, the shaping discs were a pain to track down and figure out which to get. Disappointing that they seem to be discontinued here. With the discs that come with the machine, plus two 4-packs from Amazon US, I think that covers all the Philips made discs that used to be available here, except one noodle disc (Udon if I recall). Some of the discs have different names in US compared to the Oz versions, but are still the same.

    •  

      There were a lot of complaints of error messages with the auto weigh ones.

      •  

        If it is to be believed to productreview site, plenty of satisfied customers.

        •  

          The less complicated you make something the less likely to error.

          •  

            @try2bhelpful: Say something can do 10 things and is a good quality product and then there are ten simple things that each can do only one thing, but they are bad quality. Which ones, do you think will be more likely to fail?

            •  

              @bargainparker: Even if a product is good quality if you put something in that is prone to failure it detracts, rather than adds, to its usability.

              •  

                @try2bhelpful: What is prone to failure? If you mean auto weighing, then do you have any data to back it up with?

  •  

    Any recommendations on a manual roller?

    •  

      There's two standard Italian ones, the marcato atlas or the imperia. They are both pretty much the same, I ended up getting a really good one used off gumtree with heaps of the attachments for about 90 bucks. I think brand new they can vary depending on the number of pasta attachments you get. It's very easy to use and you only need to kneed the pasta dough for about 10 mins prior to rolling it in the machine.

  •  

    This seems interesting for the price. I've used a hand crank to make pasta for years and people need to understand the many comments above that it is levels above what you can buy in the supermarket. I did look into machines like these a while back, but the texture is different to hand-made (as noted by Fotato). I'm waiting for the KitchenAid attachment to become a reasonable price….