• expired

Google Expands Free Cloud Music Storage to 50,000 Songs (Up from 20,000)

1650

Today we are expanding the music storage limit on Google Play. Now you can store 50,000 songs (previously 20,000) for free and stream or download them them to your phone, tablet, computer or Chromecast.

Announcement here and more info here.

To claim:

  • Sign in to Google Play Music - Go to your computer and visit http://play.google.com/music. Sign in with your Google account if needed.

  • Claim your free storage - If you’d like to try our subscription service too, click Get Started. Otherwise, click No Thanks to continue with the free storage.

Related Stores

Google Play
Google Play
Marketplace

closed Comments

  • +5 votes

    google article being posted on mac rumors site
    has the world gone crazy

    •  

      I thought the exact same thing..

      wish there was another service like itunes match that allows you to swap your mp3s for store mp3s..

      • +3 votes

        Google does match your mp3 with the store copy (where possible).

        • +2 votes

          really? So will copyright holders soon demand user's music lists from Google & sue you unless you can prove you actually bought a legit copy?

          <tin foil hats are on>

        • +1 vote

          @supabrudda: That's a genuine concern, IMO.

        •  

          @Make it so: All those concerns were brought up back in 2011 when Apple launched iTunes Match.

          Nothing has come out of it in the past few years, so I wouldn't be too concerned.

        •  

          @supabrudda:
          Tin foil hat = common sense/curious mind. No embarrassment or explanation required.

          There is no way on Earth I would use this service. It is like registering something (that doesn't need to be registered). Can't see anything happening today, but in the future this database can (and will be) abused.

        • -3 votes

          @Son ofa Zombie: Why did you register on OzBargain? Can't see anything happening today, but in the future the site might be sold to a marketing company and all the intimate details of the deals you were interested in can be harvested and sold.

        • +4 votes

          @eug: can't see a downside if the entire world knows I like cheap Colesworth deals. Uploading personal property… different story.

          Why are you on the defensive? Is Google's marketing so strong you feel it is a personal attack?

        •  

          @Son ofa Zombie:

          Why are you on the defensive?

          Why are you on the offensive? How is this a bad deal? Are you negging because of something that hasn't happened and only exists in your mind right now?

        • +1 vote

          @eug:
          It may be a good deal for you, but it is a bad deal for me.

          "Negging" is important for an honest and open review.

          When every deal only allows Thumbs up or everyone gets 100% Positive feedback, the voting system then becomes meaningless.

          Besides, the neg is really for the auto down-conversion to mp3. Unaware folks may not realise this, without someone pointing this out (with a neg)

        • +5 votes

          @Son ofa Zombie:

          "Negging" is important for an honest and open review.

          Sure, but negs must have valid reasons, and cannot simply be based on someone's preference. Otherwise people will be negging cheap PS4 deals because they prefer Xbox, or negging Ellie Goulding's free track because it doesn't suit their tastes, or negging Jetstar deals because they prefer Virgin.

          What is the reason for your neg? So far you've only mentioned that maybe, one day, the database might be abused, and that it's not lossless. Those are simply your preferences. The service might not suit your preferences, but that does not make it a bad deal. It doesn't even cost money.

          edit - you added the below later:

          Besides, the neg is really for the auto down-conversion to mp3.

          So you prefer lossless to MP3. Meanwhile, the rest of the world have no problem with compressed music from iTunes.

          You might want to check out the voting guidelines.
          https://www.ozbargain.com.au/wiki/help:voting_guidelines

          Specifically this part:

          If the deal doesn't apply to you, you don't like the company, or you want to leave a warning for people about the business or deal, you can leave a comment and then not vote.

          This is a compressed music servce. You do not like compressed music. Therefore this deal does not apply to you.

  • +14 votes

    Good for me but surely this doesn't pass as a deal?

  •  

    I wonder if they have a file format/size limit on the files being uploaded…

    • +7 votes

      It'll accept FLAC/AAC/OGG/ALAC/WMA, but they all get transcoded to 320K MP3. MP3s are untouched. 300MB limit per file (post-conversion).

      • -7 votes

        conversion??
        Heard enough. I'm out.

      • -1 vote

        not sure if you gave me a neg, but regardless, i gave you a positive for your info.

      • -1 vote

        Kinda odd considering the maturity of all of these codecs. Understandable in the case of FLAC or ALAC but why transcode AAC, typically that format is smaller than 320 MP3 for the same percieved quality.

        Anyhoo …

  •  

    Haven't used it previously - can you upload your own music or is this just for stuff you have bought?

  • +2 votes

    OMG! About bloody time!! I complained about the 20,000 track limit years ago and asked them to increase it but they said they absolutely wouldn't because they decided 20,000 tracks was plenty for the normal user. I wanted all my legit music available on my mobile and had around 22,000 tracks in my library so jumped on the $100 128Gb MicroSD cards last year and left Google to their antiquated assumptions ;)

    Hmm, might look back into it now but to be honest the SD card option is far better as it means everything's available while offline. Bring on the cheap 256Gb cards I say… but also the devices that can handle them too ;)

    • +1 vote

      But this means you can have a cloud backup of your music in case your SD card is lost or dies.

      • +1 vote

        Yeah, as I said… I might do it again but I've got two NAS boxes (one offsite) so disaster recovery isn't really a problem. To be honest I think I just walked away from Google and left it as is so 20,000 tracks should still be there and it wont take long to add the extras.

        •  

          Good luck uploading over 20000+ tracks. Judging on average Australian upload speeds it will only take about 30 years.

        • +1 vote

          @krazed15: Sorry, think you missed the point. I already have 20,000 uploaded so I only need to add the extras.

        •  

          @krazed15:

          Good luck uploading over 20000+ tracks. Judging on average Australian upload speeds it will only take about 30 years.

          From 2012 - http://www.smh.com.au/technology/google-launches-scan-and-ma...

          The service, which launched Tuesday, cuts uploading time for those who want to save their music libraries online. It scans a user's computer and gives them online access to the songs it finds, as long as they match the songs on its servers. Otherwise, it will upload songs to a user's online locker.

        • +1 vote

          @eug: 20k tracks took me around a month on a 25/1 ADSL line.

        • +1 vote

          I uploaded my 2000+ songs after this scan thing arrived. It saved a fair bit of time I guess, but it still took me almost a week of uploading.

  • +8 votes

    should be on forum, not a deal.

  • +2 votes

    Never quite figured out cloud storage when sd cards are so cheap.
    Does this mean you pay for bandwidth to upload them and then pay for bandwidth again every time you want to listen?

    • +3 votes

      It means you'll never lose your music if you lose your phone with your card, your card goes bad, or your hard drive crashes. And you can have your entire 350GB 50,000 MP3 collection accessible from anywhere at any time, instantly searchable and streamable through a browser at your friend's party or at work.

      • -6 votes

        lol, who has a single copy of their music and video library?

        • +5 votes

          I imagine many people do. Of those who do keep backups, I'm sure a large portion only make on site backups which means they are somewhat resilient to drive failures and the like, but still vulnerable to fires and similar circumstances that could wipe everything out.

          Hell I think half the people I know haven't worked out how to keep their phones address book sync'd via an online service, let alone having computers file system backed up offsite.

        • +2 votes

          @Smigit: Anyone who doesn't already have safe backups will soon do after their first big loss… And I wouldn't consider the cloud a more reliable option, tell me again how many times these kinds of things have been closed down in the past?

          Those people negging me are funny… And future clients.

        • +3 votes

          @bazzaa:

          Anyone who doesn't already have safe backups will soon do after their first big loss

          Well, good thing they have all their music backed up on Google Music to restore to their new hard disk, eh?

          tell me again how many times these kinds of things have been closed down in the past?

          I'm quite confident Google will be around for a very long time. If they were to shut down in 2035, I would be able to download 350GB in 20 seconds.

        • +2 votes

          @bazzaa: If a cloud service shuts down you can just move to another one. I wouldn't suggest it's the only backup someone makes, in most cases it's probably most convenient to be able to restore from a local backup first, and a cloud one secondly. I'd suggest anyone retain both a local backup and a cloud based one, and it's not a particularly expensive exercise.

          Also nothing is stopping someone using multiple cloud back ups. My music's stored on both Google and iCloud for example. Neither one will interfere with the other after all, and the only real cost may be the upload time (which all things being equal should improve for most people over the next few years).

      • +2 votes

        well said. These days bandwidth isn't really much of an issue, everyone I know has unlimited internet or at least 150GB+, plus my mobile has 5GB which i can never use up in a month, i even try to watch Foxtel Go in my lunch break.

        Each to their own, but this is AWESOME!

      • -1 vote

        To quote bazzaa, lol, who has a single copy of their music and video library?
        Thats what $90 3tb hard drives are for

        • +1 vote

          To quote bazzaa, lol, who has a single copy of their music and video library?

          What happens when lightning damages your computer and your backup drive?
          Or a thief breaks in and steals all your gear?

          Sure, you can say "just get another drive and keep it offsite". But this is the real world - people don't even back up their single copy of their photos.

          Thats what $90 3tb hard drives are for

          I don't think we're quite at that price level yet!

        • -3 votes

          @eug:"What happens when lightning damages your computer and your backup drive?
          Or a thief breaks in and steals all your gear?"

          What happens if the earth runs out of oxygen or the sky falls on me?

          "I don't think we're quite at that price level yet!"

          really? https://www.ozbargain.com.au/node/181995

        •  

          @Davros:

          What happens if the earth runs out of oxygen or the sky falls on me?

          I hope you realize you're not the only person on this earth. Just because you have never experienced a power surge or break-in doesn't mean others haven't either. I personally know people who have had their computers and valuables stolen while they were away (just two weeks ago in fact), and I also know people who have had lighting damage.

          really? https://www.ozbargain.com.au/node/181995

          Yes. Where can I buy one now?

        •  

          @eug: Terrible thread. How about you don't post in this thread anymore Davros.

    • +4 votes

      Yes… and that's the other problem I had (4G data use just for playing music) and why I went the SD route instead. I'm with Telstra and use MOG if I want to listen to stuff I don't own as it's not metered. I drove BNE to SYD and back listening to MOG most of the way… all without metered data usage!

    • +3 votes

      You only have to download it once per device. Streamed songs are cached, and you can explicitly download any songs you want and keep them on the device. 99% of the time my Play Music app is in offline only mode.

      Many songs are identified via fingerprint so you don't actually upload the file. Even if you have a 200GB music collection you're not necessarily uploading even half that. If something is identified incorrectly (sometimes it incorrectly detects a censored version — although Google seems way better at this than Amazon and iTunes), you can right click on the file, click "Fix incorrect match", and force it to upload your personal copy.

      I download an album, the Play Music agent automatically finds it on my NAS, and its instantly available on all my devices, including the iPad we use for music when hosting parties, and my web browser at work.

      All I can say is, just in time!
      http://i.imgur.com/CPVCKej.png

    • +2 votes

      A few reasons

      a) Not all devices accept an SD card
      b) Even if you do have an sd card, there's certain costs associated with that. I'm guessing 20,000+ songs is a lot of space and many people won't want to swap cards on a regular basis
      c) Not all devices take the same card format, so you could potentially have redundancy if you want to make your collection over multiple devices ehile on the go.
      d) As a remedy for both a, b and c, it opens up the option of streaming music, particularly to mobile devices but also to other computers for when you're out and about. As noted, this will typically be cached so if you listen to the same thing a lot then the data usage won't be overly excessive
      e) It adds redundancy should your cards fail, you have a fire at home or whatever. You can get the files back quite easily.

      Personally I carry a 128GB iPhone which fits my entire collection on it, but still backup to iCloud and Google's services since it gives me an easy way to restore my collection should I ever have any personal issues that prevents me accessing a local copy.

      Certainly SD cards and local storage in general has it's place…but it's by no means perfect and really, you can have a cloud backup without impacting your ability to travel with a local copy should you wish.

      •  

        "a) Not all devices accept an SD card"

        It must suck being an apple user and missing out on the most basic of features (-;

        "b) Even if you do have an sd card, there's certain costs associated with that. I'm guessing 20,000+ songs is a lot of space and many people won't want to swap cards on a regular basis"

        Yeah, $9 is such a huge amount for 32gb cards and you do know you can overwrite.
        https://www.ozbargain.com.au/node/156131
        How much is data each month?

        • +2 votes

          It must suck being an apple user and missing out on the most basic of features (-;

          I'm a Nexus user and I don't have an SD slot. That is Google's vision for mobiles too.

          Yeah, $9 is such a huge amount for 32gb cards and you do know you can overwrite.

          Irrelevant as nobody can buy it now for that price.

          How much is data each month?

          You seem to be blissfully unaware that playlists can be synced for offline playback.

        •  

          How much is data each month?

          With my home plan I have uncapped uploads…so $0 to get it onto a cloud service. Otherwise I can't give you a cost because everyone will be on different plans and have varying options available to them. In many cases people are already paying for a plan that'll cover this functionality anyway.

          It must suck being an apple user and missing out on the most basic of features (-;

          No, I don't miss SD card's really at all TBH. When I've had phones with support for them I never swapped between multiple cards anyway, it's just not a usage pattern I go for. Given the internal storage on my device works for me, it's somewhat irrelevant to me whether it's built in flash or an SD Card.

          You make it sound as though there aren't higher end Android or Windows Phones without expandable memory too.

          Yeah, $9 is such a huge amount for 32gb cards and you do know you can overwrite.

          May as well argue that you can override the internal storage in ANY device. That doesn't make your entire collection available to you at any time, which is a big deal for a lot of people. Sure, you could buy multiple small cards, but good luck figuring out what's stored on what if you have a reasonably sized music collection, and you're stuck carrying the cards if you want access to the files.

          I'm not saying use one method or the other, I just gave reasons why you might wish to use cloud based services instead of local storage. As already noted, I use both myself. At the very least an offsite solution is probably your best bet for a disaster recovery scenario, which justifies the services existence alone.

          Use what works for you.

        • +4 votes

          I never thought I'd see the day that a bunch of OzBargainers complain about a 100% free service, with a bunch of advantages over physical storage (including protection from loss/damage/theft, syncing to multiple devices, support for non-SD card devices, browser playerback, ease of use/no need to manually copy)….instead choosing to focus on ridiculous scenarios like Google shutting down without any warning and what are quite meagre bandwidth/quota issues (Oh noes, 0.2-0.3Mbps!) that won't put a dent in any half-decent internet plan.

        •  

          @eug: Like a typical fanboy there's absolutely nothing wrong with Google making a phone without an SD slot in Davros opinion.

        •  

          S6 doesn't have an SD card slot either! :)

  •  

    I'm happy, even though i'm only on 13,000 songs…

    • +1 vote

      how often do you listen to all of them? i've only listen to about ~ 500 songs from years of purchasing.

      •  

        Each to their own. I regularly listen to many of my older albums, usually driven by mood and after reading some of the comments here I think it's time for some Sepultura up really loud ;)

      •  

        I've got around 60k unique tracks (about a third of them I also have as flac, but keep an mp3 for streaming) and my 'to listen' playlist is around 5k songs.

        Damn you, cheap bandcamp albums.

  • +1 vote

    Silly question I signed in, but where do I claim the free storage?
    Maybe it's geo-restricted

    •  

      You don't have to do anything. It's automatic. I just went to http://music.google.com and there was a banner there saying it was now 50000 songs.

      •  

        I went to upload a song & it says i have 20,000 left.

        I was interesting in how it says you can upload your itunes library.
        I wonder if it just ID's the song & lets you have it, rather then uploading the songs?

        •  

          Music files are fingerprinted using some sort of magic algorithm. If it matches, its added to Google Music without uploading. If not, it uploads manually.

          Amazon MP3 and iTunes Match work the same way, although IIRC unlike Google+Amazon, iTunes doesn't let you override the match if it's wrong.

        •  

          @SteveBuscemi:

          Yeah I was more interested how it access your iTunes library, does it actually decrypt it & look at the songs or does it just read the titles & match that way.

          either way it might be a good way to escape itunes or share itunes libraries

        •  

          @SteveBuscemi: I've never had anything match :/ I just assumed it didn't do matching at all.

        •  

          I got the same message - when I checked under settings though it says 50,000?

  •  

    Does this have a iphone app?

  • +1 vote

    What if you have higher quality music (eg. in FLAC or ALAC) will it still "upload" them or does it work similarly to iTunes Match?

    • +1 vote

      It'll upload but, alas, convert to 320K mp3.

      • +1 vote

        In that case its not really "uploading" right? It should just "match" the track in their library like what iTunes Match does?

        •  

          I'm not speaking from knowledge of this system but I am assuming they are uploading the full size flac and then transcoding it to mp3 to reduce storage and bandwidth on the following downloads. If it allows you to upload anything then it can't match songs it doesn't have. Just speculation on my part though, take it with a grain of salt

        •  

          It would only upload if no match is found via a fingerprint, once uploaded it would convert if above 320k mp3 quality, hope this helps.

  •  

    With the traffic limit on local internet plans it would just take a few years to fill this up. Seriously, who really needs more than 20.000 songs online?

    • +5 votes

      who really needs more than 20.000 songs online?

      People who spent the last 15 years collecting them? :)

  •  

    Will it take 3.6 GBph or 8_Mbps from a local LTE server ??

  •  

    Is there any benefit of this for people who already have a Spotify Premium subscription?

    •  

      All the songs that aren't available on Spotify? The fact that it's free?

    •  

      One of the main advantages is you can upload your own songs and use them side by side with the subscription. They don't have every artist (on Spotify or Google Music) so you can have your weird and wonderful stuff all in one place.

      •  

        Ok, I can see the benefit, I had never really understood what the point of Google Music was before. I will be honest and admit that I don't really have any local music on my computer anymore after pretty much entirely switched to streaming/ syncing.

        If there are songs that I reeeally want that Spotify doesn't have I can sync local files in Spotify to another device on the same network, although I see how if you didn't have access to it how it would benefit you. I used to have about 80GB of music, the idea of waiting for that to upload seemed crazy even just a couple of years ago

        •  

          I used to have about 80GB of music, the idea of waiting for that to upload seemed crazy even just a couple of years ago

          If the song that you have on your hard disk matches one in Google's database, you don't actually have to upload it. Google will add it to your account automatically via the Music Manager desktop app.

    •  

      Someone above mentioned local syncing, unless Spotify would do this also.. . Exy

    •  

      If you're a bit naughty and convert your Spotify playlist to MP3, you can then sync those tracks to Play Music which will then presumably replace them with fresh, first-gen copies. But that's being a bit naughty!

    •  

      /-perhaps not until either of them support lossless as available elsewhere.

    • +1 vote

      I've used both in the past, and am currently on Spotify Premium. I like Spotify more as I don't have to pay for individual albums/singles whereas with Google Play Music you do.

      • +2 votes

        Google Music has streaming like Spotify, as well as a storefront like iTunes where you buy tracks/albums. They are separate things, although I can see why people would get mixed up; it's not exactly made clear.

        (as well as letting you upload your own music)

        •  

          You can't stream for free with Google though. Spotify does (well did when I looked) have a free account. If you don't pay with Google, you only have your own songs and ones you purchased through Google.

        •  

          @Shonky: That's true, but they were talking about Spotify Premium. Which would be the equivalent of GMAA (although I think Google is a couple of bucks more per month?).

    •  

      The fact that you can stream Google Play Music All Access to your Home Theatre via a Chromecast, without the need to replace your very expensive new-ish receiver with one that has SpotifyConnect built in to do the same.

      Instead, I chose to replace my Spotify Premium subscription with Google's and haven't looked back. The fact that you can upload your own library (in case something is missing in theirs) is a bonus.

  •  

    so would ppl use this or spotify?

  • +1 vote

    Yes upload all the illegally downloaded songs you have.