This was posted 4 years 3 months 17 days ago, and might be an out-dated deal.

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Regulated International Voltage Power Adaptors $6.95 and $6.98 at Dick Smith (Click&Collect)

440

Exactly what I was looking for the next overseas trip.

DSE is currently selling two different models of Regulated International Voltage Power Adaptors, special offer for today only

Model M9926

Output voltage: 5, 7.5, 12, 15, 18, 23V
Rated current (mA) at 240V input:
- 1000mA max at 5 Volts
- 900mA max at 7.5 Volts
- 700mA max at 12 Volts
- 400mA max at 15 Volts
- 400mA max at 18 Volts
- 300mA max at 23 Volts

Model M9927

Output voltage: 3, 4.5, 6.0, 7.5, 9.0 and 12V DC
Rated current (mA) at 240V input:
- 1500mA max at 3 Volts
- 1200mA max at 4.5 Volts
- 1000mA max at 6 Volts
- 900mA max at 7.5 Volts
- 800mA max at 9 Volts
- 700mA max at 12 Volts

DSE eBay store is currently selling them for $38.98 and $40.98 respectively

Pretty good review.

Please note - this is not as good as the previous deal however based on the comments, lots of orders got rejected last time

Click and Collect available.

The cheapest similar product I could find on eBay costs $19.99

So this seems a good buy.

Edit: DSE have lowered the price to $6.95 and $6.98 respectively

Related Stores

Dick Smith / Kogan
Dick Smith / Kogan

closed Comments

  • -3 votes

    Dats dope…

    In other words, eneloops are at $19.98 for the 8 packs.

    That's right my pretties, keep decreasing in price, soon you'll be at $15 where you belong and I shall pounce!

  • +3 votes

    Thanks OP.

    TBH, $40 is probably a very inflated price, but either way, around $8 for this is good and very handy to have.

  •  

    ordered 3 as replacement for the crappy Chinese straight pins ones for some pan and tilt video cams.
    Thanks OP!

    •  

      No worries.
      Which model did you buy?

      I got the M9927 for $7.59 - I believe this is the better buy… but not 100% sure.
      Can anybody please confirm?

      •  

        These type of devices use 5V so I bought Model M9926 as the other one does either 4.5 or 6, which is not good enough.

  • +1 vote

    Is it just me or do the pins look like they do not have any insulation? Maybe they don't meet our Aussie standards?

    • +2 votes

      I would be surprised if many things we have in our homes "actually meet Australian standards" nowdays.
      So much cheap rubbish being imported and sold under "self compliance"…it is a joke.
      Led Lighting is a perfect example.

      But your point noted and when i pick mine up i will have a look… :)

      •  

        "Australian Standards" are still just acceptable minimums. Highlights how bad things are, when even they aren't met.

    • +1 vote

      What you'll find is these are actually Chinese plugs. They are the same "V" shape as ours, but upside down. That's why you'll find the bulk of the mass hangs above the pins on our sockets, not the more logical way of having the heavier mass hanging down. Also the cord should hang downwards, not enter from the top as these would do, in case they get splashed with liquids and run down the cord into the plug. Only AUS plugs now need to be half-insulated, and as these are called "international", I guess they are sidestepping that as they are technically Chinese plugs. They work just as well here though, just ordered 3 myself. Not a big fan of upside-down plug packs, but at this price I think I can overlook it this time.

      •  

        Maybe the price reflects the quality (or lack thereof) of the internals, which could be considered more important than where the mass is hanging…

        • +1 vote

          Sure, but they were selling for $41. Did their quality come down with the price too? I can't really say how good the internals are in any case, but I suspect they will be better than the el-cheapo iPhone charger clones.

          The hanging mass is a little more than just aesthetic. With heavier/larger units (not sure of these particular units) they can experience a larger torsional stress or rotational force than the low hanging fruit variety. They are more prone to levering themselves out of a wall-socket, potentially causing a poor connection and arcing.( think of the pins as the pivot-point or axle, and the heavier mass being higher and further out). In the inverted position, the mass is lower and if anything is pulling in towards the wall and helping the connection. I'm sure that in China these are perfectly fine as their centre of mass will be low and their cords are pointed down, just as designed. But our AUS units which work fine here would suddenly become just as problematic there.

          Of course this doesn't matter if you plug either of them into a power board lying flat on the ground.

        •  

          @endotherm:

          With heavier/larger units (not sure of these particular units) they can experience a larger torsional stress or rotational force than the low hanging fruit variety.

          That all makes perfect sense, but these mini SMPSUs are so light that I wouldn't really worry about it. If they used linear transformers on the other hand, I would be more concerned.

          Maybe the photo was from before 2005 before having insulated pins was mandatory? I'd be quite surprised if such a large chain was selling non-compliant electrical items.

        • +2 votes

          I picked mine up today. They do have insulated pins, so it's just an old photo that they're using on their website.

        •  

          Of course this doesn't matter if you plug either of them into a power board lying flat on the ground.

          Actually it would as unless it's a single row it would block the plug across from it :)

        •  

          @gokhanh: Well My double-row, 12 outlet board has a slot with nothing across from it, to suit just this type of product. :-)

        •  

          @endotherm:

          Now that's convenient :)

  •  

    Sorry if this is a dumb question but do anyone know if I can use this to replace my toshiba laptop charger?

  •  

    Great thanks.

    I don't need these, but might enable me to throw out my drawer full of old adapters.

  •  

    OK so I called DSE just wanted to check the productivity of these… was told they won't be able to charge Laptops (not enough power) or most of the tablets (unless it has AC port)… so what else we could use them for?

    •  

      I actually need one for a particle meter bought from US.

    • +2 votes

      They would be used to power devices which required the specific voltage and ampage - hell not everything is simplified like the 5Volt 1 (or more) Amp "USB" style charger.

      older video game consoles (eg: Atari 2600), android media boxes, home phone docks etc. MIGHT (if their voltage and amperage needs are met) require these power supplies, if the original PSU is broken / lost.

      I know your question may have been asked out of naivety, but it's a little like asking why there are different types of oil and petrol - some devices just need something different because they were made / designed that way.

    • +1 vote

      Pretty useful for old small devices you may have lost the power supply for, or if the power supply is from outside AU.
      I've currently got something similar connected to an old battery charger, and to my old BR900-CD recording box.

    • +3 votes

      Did you know…. if you don't need one, especially if you don't know what it is, you don't have to buy one!?

      Amazing, right!?

      You are a corporations dream.

  •  

    Will it be suited for this?

    https://www.massdrop.com/buy/massdrop-o2-amplifier#tab-descr...

    Says 15V AC on the unit.. but the plug on sale is DC with an AC plug?

    bit noob in electronics.

    •  

      No it wouldn't suit.

    •  

      It might work…
      In the 2nd pic it looks like it has a rectifier right after the power jack to convert the 15VAC to DC. If you connected the power jack to DC the rectifier would simply pass it through since it is already DC.

  •  

    What about the M9915 at $9.05? I'm looking for something that can do 1.5A out for a BOB2.

    Edit: Sorry, not international, my bad.

  •  

    If my broken power supply state: output 6V - 2A.

    Will the M9927 be able to replace it?

    Thanks

    •  

      Nope, you need a 6V 2,000mA one.

      That said, if your device uses less than 1A, it'd work.

  • +1 vote

    12 Volts at 700mA not much at all., it should be at least 1A

    •  

      I am also looking for a unit that will do 1A at 16V for a Logitech 1st gen PureFi express plus, but damned if I can find one anywhere, do you think I can get away with such a low Ampere rating?

        •  

          Thanks but 30bucks for an adapter plus shipping is just not OzBargain enough. I could buy the Sony speaker at JB for 50 afterall

      •  

        Not recommended, even if it did work

        •  

          Why?

        • +2 votes

          @eug: Because it would be drawing more current than it is designed to deliver. A bit like asking why can't I tow a semitrailer with a Hyundai Getz. You probably could if someone helped you get it going, but smoke and failure is certainly not far away.

        •  

          @endotherm: Yep lol

        •  

          @endotherm: The Logitech uses a 16V 1A adaptor - so the most it can draw is 16 watts. I linked to a 15V 2A adaptor - that's 30 watts of possible power.

          I'm not sure exactly what the internal design of the speaker is like, but am quite sure the 6.25% reduction in voltage will not damage anything - it's just a simple audio amplifier. Do keep in mind that it's also designed to run off a mere 9 volts (6x 1.5V AAs), and that's not taking into account the alkaline discharge curve.

          At full volume there would be a corresponding increase in current draw as you mention, which is why I linked to an adaptor that can supply nearly twice the power giving a healthy amount of overhead.

          If the OP really wants exactly 16V, just buy a ~$5-10 boost or buck converter off ebay and use any adaptor that can supply the right amount of power.

        •  

          @eug: Sorry, I was replying to addison8019's comment, who was replying to Jackson's question about getting away with a 12V 700mA supply to replace a 12V 2A supply (actually he hijacked the 2A discussion with a new one about 1A instead of asking a new question). I can see where the confusion came from, and my response was immediately below your comment and you were replying to me. I don't disagree with your initial suggestion.

          Yes, it might be able to run off 9V of battery power, but the current draw will be doubled. It's not so much about the voltage (I believe buck/boot devices only change voltage), but the current available from the supply. I'm sure I could boost an AA battery to run my 240V steam iron… for a few milliseconds. :)

          To be honest, even this humble adaptor will probably power the device and it's display, but don't expect it to be able to reproduce sound beyond a whisper. The 1A rating is there as a "worst case scenario" for full demand at full volume with everything lit up and operating.

        • +2 votes

          @endotherm: Mmmm, it was Peterozwho was asking about the 12V adaptor.

          Jackson then hijacked his question saying that he was looking for an adaptor that will do 1A at 16V, and that he couldn't find one anywhere.

          I then suggested a 15V plugpack.

          To which addison8019 said it wouldn't work.

          Anyway, I think we both agree that these adaptors won't suit his needs. :)

        •  

          @eug: Yes, we agree to agree :). Mostly.

          addison8019's comment is indented from and therefore replying to Jackson, not you (even though it was an hour and a half after your post). Had he been replying to you it would have been indented from your post or been preceded by @eug if the nesting was substantial. Reading top to bottom, it certainly appears that he was replying to your post.

          It was Peteroz who chimed in with a new comment (fully left justified) which by itself was a pointless and baseless opinion, however made perfect sense in the context of the preceding posts. My kinder nature just assumed he confused the reply and post new comment input boxes.

          Prepare for fight with Peteroz in 3… 2… 1… :)

        •  

          @endotherm: Thanks for adding, but you need a coffee or something, I didn't hijack a 2A discussion, the dude was talking about 1A. The 2A was a response to me.

          The last thing you said was what I was after, that you don't think it would produce sound, still maybe I will take a punt, its useful to have one of these for random devices

        •  

          @Jackson: Yeah I know I'm being pedantic. I playfully called it hijacking the thread because thxful started a new question about 6v 2A, eug answered that post. Then Peteroz started a new conversation out of left field (not replying to eug) stating 12V@700mA wasn't much and an opinion that it needs to be 1A. Why? In what context? We don't know what he is referring to and what needs 1A. I assumed he was trying to add something to the 6V2A discussion, but I don't know what offering information about 12V contributed. It doesn't make a lot of sense as a stand-alone comment.

          Anyway, your question was about neither the 6V or 12V conversation, but a new query for a 16V1A unit, which shouldn't have been a reply to Peteroz (who probably screwed up the flow of the thread in the first place :) ), but should have been a new comment in the "Post New Comment" box. That's why I referred to it as hijacking, don't take it to heart. It doesn't take much to mess up the flow of a conversation — I'm glad you can work out which dude was talking about 1A and which 2A response was to you, because I'm not at all clear, everyone is talking about different voltages and currents. Then you asking "…do you think I can get away with such a low Ampere rating?", I don't know whether you are referring to the 2A post, 1A, 700mA or the 400mA the Model M9926 could supply, being the closest voltage match. Just like eug misread that I was challenging his suggestion, when I was actually responding to someone else's comment.

          Again, I have no intention of upsetting anyone, just pointing out it got confusing and went off the rails a few messages ago. Anyway, eug accused you of hijacking as well, have a go at him… :)

          But back to the useful part, I agree it would be handy to have one of these laying around for unforeseen uses for random devices, and it's a bonus that you can just dial up the appropriate voltage. Just consider that for this current purpose, Logitech chose to include a more expensive 16W supply for a reason, at some point the device could be expected to draw up to that amount. If they could have got away with a smaller one they would have. Just be careful you don't crank it up too loudly.

          P.S. I enjoyed the coffee :)

        •  

          @endotherm: I am not having a go at anyone, I just didn't think anything was confusing. Its hard to have conversation about enough amps without suggesting other numbers.

          These were used for everything back in the day, but modern devices are much more demanding, use will be fairly limited

        •  

          @endotherm: Exactly lol. I was confused, I thought I must have hit the wrong reply button. I agree with you and @eug completely. @Jackson the power supply amperage rating needs to be equal to or greater than what the device it's powering draws, there are no shortcuts. The supply @eug suggested from Jaycar is much better quality than the supply listed on this ad, and would be a perfect solution for your problem.

      •  

        Or try http://www.altronics.com.au/p/m9357a-powertran-18v-dc-1.33a-...
        18 volts 1.33A $25.90 with reversible 2.1mm DC jack
        at Altronics 15 Short Street Auburn New South Wales 2144

        •  

          Sheesh why do these thing cost so much!? I think I am going to buy one from eBay and splice my old cable on

        •  

          @Jackson: Maybe splice two or three of these in parallel to provide enough current? But you're quickly approaching the same price. Even on eBay they are around $25-30 if you can find them, 18 volts is pretty uncommon and if you do find them they are probably AC not DC.

        •  

          @endotherm: sorry wasn't clear, there is someone selling similar amp and voltage on eBay but the connector isn't correct, they were 5 bucks or so, but for the saving of 25 bucks I could use the pain in the arse

        •  

          @Jackson: OK I understand. The only ones I found on ebay were AC, I think they use them in PA systems and house music systems, as well as alarm panels and some musical instruments. But they were also around $25 or more, sometimes with outrageous shipping from US or UK.

          If they are AC output types, you might have to include a rectifier and voltage regulator in line to suit the device. If you are lucky, they have the necessary circuitry in the input of your device and work without adding anything.

        •  

          @Jackson: I tend to stay away from bottom-of-the-barrel adaptors like those. They're usually poorly made, have a dirty output, and can be dangerous.

        •  

          @eug: yeah but like I said by the time I spend 25 bucks I am half way to a replacement device. I will give it a shot and if it's no good then may check with a friend who has a electronics wrecking yard, or get a way above specifications laptop adapter

        •  

          @Jackson: If you can get your hands on a cheap/free old laptop-style power brick that can supply around 20W, and don't mind getting your hands slightly dirty, you can get a buck converter like this and a DC power cable that'll fit your speaker (is it 5.5/2.1mm?). That'll be the cheapest way to get any voltage power supply you need, as long as it's a few volts below the voltage of your laptop power supply.

          If you have a desktop computer you can even use the 12V line, hooked up to a boost converter instead.

        •  

          @eug: Mate I can't see that link, giving me a 404 (the first one)

        •  

          @Jackson: Strange, the link feature didn't seem to work then.
          Here's the direct link:
          http://ebay.com.au/itm/DC-DC-Step-down-7-32V-12A-100W-Buck-C...

  • +4 votes

    Paid full price for one 2 months ago as I was desperate. Both made a loudish humming noise which I assumed to be faulty so returned it only for the replacement to do the same. I've read up that it could be the coils under load if this happens to anyone else with this adaptor.

    The guy at DS blamed my device and wouldn't plug it in to check whether it was just my device or it was the plug itself.

  •  

    Exactly what I was looking for the next overseas trip.

    Just out of curiosity OP, what are you powering for your overseas trip?

    •  

      See comments above, I was wrong - unfortunately this wouldn't charge my laptop…

      • +1 vote

        laptops typically require about 19-20V and 2-3A of current. These aren't powerful enough for that.

        It will work for, say, another adaptor for my cordless drill battery charger which does about 20V/300mA, or the car jump starter which needs about 15V/300mA.

  •  

    These things are a bad idea. They have been responsible for the death of millions of innocent gadgets over the years, by wrong voltage or polarity. You only need to get it wrong once.
    Fortunately these days most gadgets use either mini/micro USB for 5V, or 5.5mm centre-pos 12V.

    • +3 votes

      They have been responsible for the death of millions of innocent gadgets over the years, by wrong voltage or polarity.

      So you are saying the device's design & architecture are solely responsible for the 'death of millions of innocent gadgets' and the end-user has no part/role to play in the demise of these devices? Thanks for the insight.

    • +3 votes

      I find checking the polarity and voltage before you plug the gadget in helps avoid this problem.

    •  

      …most gadgets use either mini/micro USB for 5V, or 5.5mm centre-pos 12V

      Couldn't disagree more. While true they are very common connections, there are a plethora of other sizes and shapes in use. Just in front of me I have a few that take a 1.3mm plug, a 6V one, one 5.5mm centre-negative and another 12 V AC. That's without even getting up and having a look around.

      •  

        What I find really annoying is how some 5.5mm plugs have and ID of 2.1mm while a few select others decide to use 2.5mm, even though the voltages are the same.

        I would say micro USB and 5.5/2.1mm are the most common plugs I see nowadays though, followed by the EIAJ-02 4mm plug.

  •  

    Not sure about this one, the one I got many years ago voltage is not really correct. 5V can end up to be 6V instead.

  •  

    Could this be used as a laptop charger or is it way under powered?

  • +1 vote

    can someone help me here :)

    I have a handheld massager from US that states:
    INPUT: AC 120V 60Hz 0.4A

    Would any of these be safe?

    Cheers
    link

  • +2 votes

    Both out of stock. (Temporarily), but I'd say long enough as not to be on sale!

  •  

    Cheaper today at 7.24 bucks
    Stock still available

  • +1 vote

    Picked up M9927 today. It has an unpleasant smell. Probably yet another source of indoor air pollution.

  •  

    Stock available. Got 1 each because I know I have need of them in gadgets. Thanks op.

  • +1 vote

    Thanks Op. I just bought one online. Thankfully still can order and there is still stock.

  •  

    these won't be enough for an external hdd that needs a power brick, wouldn't they? i believe most of those hdd require 12V, but with 1.5A. am i right? thanks!

  •  

    DSE have lowered the price to $6.95 and $6.98 respectively

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