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OkayFreedom VPN 1 Year License for $0 Usually US $29.90

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Go to the provided link, enter your email address and that's about it. One year license for the premium version of OKFreedom VPN.

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OkayFreedom VPN
OkayFreedom VPN

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  •  

    Just worth mentioning that, if you think about it, any VPN services offered to you cheap/free means that you are literally their actual product (their true methods of earning money).

    • +8 votes

      This is not a free service, it is $30 a year, this is just a christmas special from a german computer magazine

    •  

      Not necessarily. Plenty of services offer a free introductory period in the hope that you'll like their service so much you'll pay for it, eg. Foxtel, Stan, Presto, Dreamhost and other web hosting services, etc.

    •  

      A company also needs customers to spread word of mouth (keyboard) recommendations to generate business.
      Plus they hope happy customers will pay the next year.

    •  

      Agreed. Please see comments on previous deals.
      Sorry but I am going to neg this deal.

      https://www.ozbargain.com.au/node/227781

  • +2 votes

    The price is right.

    Thanks.

  • +3 votes

    Anyone used them before

    •  

      I tried there free version and it was terrible, uninstalled it immediately. Perhaps the premium version is better?

    •  

      Yep, used it last time there was a free year deal. Absolutely terrible

    •  

      just tried now. Comparing to my nbn 90mbps without vpn, i get 1-10mbps for every okayfreedom server available

  • +3 votes

    I'm no stooge for Okay Freedom but I've been using this VPN for about 2-3 years now and I think it really does the job. Never had any problems with it but early on I did experience a few pop ups until I worked out when not using the VPN to actually exit out of the program altogether and never had a pop up since.

    Even if the little eye is red it means the program is still running just not active so right click exit on that and haven't had a pop up for a good 18 months from them now.

    • +1 vote

      I should add once the free 12 month premium licence runs out they then set a limit of 2GB of downloads allowed per month for free unless you pay.

      I just rode that out for about 6 months until the last one of these free unlimited 12 month deals came up again recently.

  • +3 votes

    "The OkayFreedom service saves neither addresses nor content accessed by the user, the IP address that OkayFreedom assigned to them; nor the user's own IP address through which they are using OkayFreedom. As a result, it is not possible for Steganos to ascertain the content an OkayFreedom user has accessed. Neither the IP address of the user nor that of the accessed servers are saved."

    https://www.okayfreedom.com/en/privacy

    •  

      Do you believe them? They must contain at least some logs, or else how will they know how much you've downloaded? Remember, after the one year, you'll be on 2GB a month.

      •  

        I believe the answer you seek is covered in the link :)

        Edit: "For billing and load balancing purposes, OkayFreedom determines which data volume (only the amount of data transmitted, not addresses or content) belongs to which pseudonymous user-ID. The pseudonymous ID is derived from the hash value of the computer's MAC address on which OkayFreedom is being used and is not traceable to a particular computer or user."

        •  

          That sounds ridiculous.

        • +1 vote

          @Diji1: Buyer (or bargainer) beware I guess :)

        •  

          It sounds like OkayFreedom has enough info that they can still identify you. Psudo ID is just there to obfuscate things a bit, but they know who you are. If you're doing something to break the terms of service with OkayF, they would terminate your account. Obviously they'd be able to do that. They can identify your account via the pseudo ID (or else they wouldn't be able to terminate you) and when you signed up for your account you gave them your details right?

          If authorities ask them to hand over your details, would they? They won't be able to say "I can't because I have no records kept and have no way of identifying who the user is".

    •  

      Steganos will fully cooperate with public and private criminal and legal authorities in cases of rights violations by the users to the extent required by law and according to their own discretion

      https://www.okayfreedom.com/en/tos

      • -1 vote

        Are you aware of any VPN company that won't comply with lawful requests if asked? Furthermore, no technologies of this calibre are going to be immune to the efforts of certain groups to obtain your data.

        I see your point, but there's nothing any of us can really do to avoid data being captured if someone with the right resources really wants to.

        (This is going down the tinfoil route quickly haha)

        • +1 vote

          Some will refuse to hand over logs unless a court order is issued. And if the law was ever changed that they must hand them over without one, they will pack up and move to another country to operate.

          Others will simply comply if asked.

        •  

          Sure, but when those logs are presented as evidence in court, it will be public knowledge that the VPN company handed over the logs. How often does that happen?

          If you are doing something really nasty, the logs may just be background information and not presented in court. If it's a copyright issue, the logs will likely be the only evidence they have and need to be presented.

        •  

          The EU has much tighter privacy and data protection laws actually, much tighter than Australia. This appears to be a German company who are not officially operating in Australia so good luck with that AFP.

          Does anybody have a list of what countries their VPN's terminates in?

          Email received in about 2 minutes.

  • +1 vote

    May as well give it a try.

  •  

    Hey guys, any reason to use VPN in Australia?
    I mean for what kind of websites do u usually use it?

    • +1 vote

      well duh, ozbargain

    • +2 votes

      Use a VPN if you ever, ahem, torrent. I mean, hypothetically…

      (Say goodbye to The Pirate Bay soon)

    • +2 votes

      Australia now retains "metadata" ie the list of every site you have visited.
      This was supposed to be for law enforcement only, but they are already considering allowing access for civil copyright enforcement.
      How long until the data is sold to employers so they can perform character checks on new employees?
      Will there ever be a hack where an ISP's logs are dumped into public?

      A VPN currently prevents that metadata from accumulating.

      Web censoring started this week with some movie piracy sites being blocked.
      (Use non ISP DNS such as 8.8.8.8 or a VPN to bypass)
      Its the top of a slippery slope, today its torrent sites (which are not 100% pirate content), tomorrow its political sites and versions of the news the government doesnt agree with.

  • +1 vote

    Supports OpenVPN ?

  •  

    Would this be good to use with kodi/exodus?

    Recently installed it and have been wondering if I need a VPN

  •  

    Why would you need a vpn? Sorry but i don't know why people use vpns.

    •  

      Torrenting and viewing contents that aren't available in Australia

    • +5 votes

      One great reason is purchasing digital content from overseas. Great examples include Battlefield 1. During black friday sales it went to around $60 (i don't remember exactly) in Australia. But A quick VPN to South Korea gets you the game for ~$36.

    • +1 vote

      People get paranoid about the australian government watching all their internet traffic, torrent downloads etc. It can also be handy to buy things from different origin online stores in another currency.

      No, I don't use one though.

      •  

        Can the Aust Govt still see the data being transferred between the VPN and you? Or is that data encrypted?

        Let's say child porn is being downloaded to your system and the govt sees it and arrests you.

        But if you had a VPN, they would still see the child porn being downloaded wouldn't they? Just that instead of the porn originating from the porn site, the porn is being downloaded from the VPN.

        Unless it's encrypted. But can you also encrypt without a VPN?

        • +1 vote

          Most decent VPN services will use at least AES-256 to encrypt the traffic between them and you. Between the VPN and the server you are downloading the content from will be normal HTTP or HTTPS (assuming web content). So theoretically the government could see the content (or at least URL) going from the content provider to the VPN but would not be able to identify which VPN user had requested it. If the VPN service kept logs or allowed the government access to the live server, they could then connect the user with the content.

          If you're connecting to a VPN server in another country, then the Australian government would need a warrant in that jurisdiction or cooperation from that country. It's a real stretch that anything like that would happen in a copyright context but for really serious crimes I would think that's possible.

        •  

          "Asking for a friend" are ya?

        • +1 vote

          @lockmc: Hah no. I'm not into that kind of stuff. Not even because it's illegal. There's simply nothing to see. I can't understand how it can appeal to anyone to be honest.

          But it was an example for illustration purposes. I probably should have said, if you hack ANZ bank or something via VPN, whether the govt could trace you. But we are talking about the aust govt being able to see everything you download, so that example isn't as relevant.

        •  

          @dazweeja: I do know of copyright infringement notices served to people who used VPNs that supposedly didn't keep logs. It's hard to trust claims by VPNs, and I go on the assumption that they are keeping your logs and could sell you out, regardless of what they claim. The important thing to me is not whether the government can theoretically find out it was you doing naughty things, but whether or not they can do anything about it.

        •  

          @lostn:

          Unless your VPN is set up correctly, it is easy to leak your real IP address. I'd tend towards user error than the VPN provider but the latter is of course possible because not all VPN providers are equal.

  •  

    ozbargained already?

    signed up ~ but no sign of the code

  •  

    Thx OP. Is this good for mobile devices?

  • +6 votes

    Same deal last Christmas didn't get rated well as people complained about adware. Has it changed?

  • +1 vote

    Forgive me if it's a stupid question, but I wonder if using a VPN service is perfectly legal in Australia?

  • +1 vote

    Worth noting this is Windows only. No Mac support

  •  

    damn! just got windscribe VPN for 1 year for USD 12 just a week ago!

  •  

    Can I use OkayFreedom VPN on more than one computer?
    When you have a premium account, you can only use this on one computer at a time. When you use your premium code on another new computer, your premium traffic contingent on the first computer will be deactivated.

    worth noting. one premium code for 1 device only.

  •  

    Australia is not amongst the supported countries, damn!

    • +4 votes

      You generally dont want a local VPN server. It is better to cross international jurisdictions to a country with stronger privacy laws who dont bow down to corporate demands.

  •  

    No email received

  •  

    I tried this on a throw away windows7 virtualbox install and it does work. My premium key was accepted.

    I would avoid installation of the browser plugin at the end of the installation wizard. I did not notice any advert insertions but I would say the browser plugin would be responsible for this if you are getting extra ads. Cannot comment on speeds

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