expired H2 Melon Water - 100% Watermelon Juice 1L $3.50 at Woolworths

1390

In honour of my namesake I am sharing this deal with my fellow ozbargainers. $3.50 at Woolies.

closed Comments

  • +1 vote

    I love that stuff

    • +6 votes

      considering fresh water melon is in season and about $1 kg, why this stuff …… one juiced, most juices oxides , when you can have fresh cheaper and healthier …..

      and water melon doesn’t require much chewing or leave stuff stuck between your teeth.

  • +6 votes

    I bought some of this the other day. It is so much worse than blended water melon. It has a nutty taste to it.

  •  

    Not sure if it taste any good…

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    What are the benefits of drinking this aoart from getting a sugar high?

    • +2 votes

      You get hydrated due to watermelon having a high water content.

      Still a bad product though.

    • +11 votes

      I actually wrote a 3k word report on this for my degree. There are performance benefits, from reduced rate of muscle failure to faster recovery. There's heaps of studies available that you can look up if that interest you!

      • +24 votes

        This was my reference list:
        Australian Institute of Sport 2017, ABCD Classification System, Australian Institute of Sport, Australian Government, viewed 2 September 2017, https://www.ausport.gov.au/ais/nutrition/supplements/classification.

        Eat for Health 2015, Guideline 2 recommends we enjoy a wide variety of nutritious foods from the five groups every day, Eat for Health, Australian Government, viewed 2 September 2017, https://www.eatforhealth.gov.au/food-essentials/five-food-groups/fruit.

        Bryk, J., Ochoa, J., Correia, M., Munera-Seeley, V. and Popovic, P. (2008). Effect of Citrulline and Glutamine on Nitric Oxide Production in RAW 264.7 Cells in an Arginine-Depleted Environment. Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, 32(4), pp.377-383.

        Collins, J., Wu, G., Perkins-Veazie, P., Spears, K., Claypool, P., Baker, R. and Clevidence, B. (2007). Watermelon consumption increases plasma arginine concentrations in adults. Nutrition, 23(3), pp.261-266.

        Gonzalez, J., Fuchs, C., Betts, J. and van Loon, L. (2017). Glucose Plus Fructose Ingestion for Post-Exercise Recovery—Greater than the Sum of Its Parts?. Nutrients, 9(4), p.344.

        Goubel, F., Vanhoutte, F., Allaf, O., Verleye, M. and Gillardin, J. (1997). Citrulline malate limits increase in muscle fatigue induced by bacterial endotoxins. Canadian Journal of Physiology and Pharmacology, 75(3), pp.205-207.

        Hong, Y., Betik, A. and McConell, G. (2014). Role of nitric oxide in skeletal muscle glucose uptake during exercise. Experimental Physiology, 99(12), pp.1569-1573.

        Jayaprakasha, G., Chidambara Murthy, K. and Patil, B. (2011). Rapid HPLC-UV method for quantification of l-citrulline in watermelon and its potential role on smooth muscle relaxation markers. Food Chemistry, 127(1), pp.240-248.

        Moore, K. (2006). Essential Clinical Anatomy + Grant's Dissector. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

        Osowska, S. (2006). Citrulline modulates muscle protein metabolism in old malnourished rats. AJP: Endocrinology and Metabolism, 291(3), pp.E582-E586.

        Pérez-Guisado, J. and Jakeman, P. (2010). Citrulline Malate Enhances Athletic Anaerobic Performance and Relieves Muscle Soreness. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 24(5), pp.1215-1222.

        SAHLIN, K., TONKONOGI, M. and SODERLUND, K. (1998). Energy supply and muscle fatigue in humans. Acta Physiologica Scandinavica, 162(3), pp.261-266.

        Sureda, A., Córdova, A., Ferrer, M., Pérez, G., Tur, J. and Pons, A. (2010). l-Citrulline-malate influence over branched chain amino acid utilization during exercise. European Journal of Applied Physiology, 110(2), pp.341-351.

        Tarazona-Díaz, M., Alacid, F., Carrasco, M., Martínez, I. and Aguayo, E. (2013). Watermelon Juice: Potential Functional Drink for Sore Muscle Relief in Athletes. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 61(31), pp.7522-7528.

        Tarazona-Díaz, M., Viegas, J., Moldao-Martins, M. and Aguayo, E. (2011). Bioactive compounds from flesh and by-product of fresh-cut watermelon cultivars. Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture, 91(5), pp.805-812.

        Von Duvillard, S., Braun, W., Markofski, M., Beneke, R. and Leithäuser, R. (2004). Fluids and hydration in prolonged endurance performance. Nutrition, 20(7-8), pp.651-656.

        Yudkoff, M. (1999), Basic Neurochemistry, 6th edition. Lippincott-Raven, Philadelphia

        • +2 votes

          @Putnum: I didn't write the report on the product, but on the topic: "Watermelon: is it the wonder fruit for sport?".

          The references are there as a follow up of the …"There's heaps of studies available that you can look up if that interest you". I.e. do your own research but here's a head start.

          :)

        •  

          @Sir Flabo: what were your findings/conclusions?

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          @kiLbiL:
          This is what I wrote for the conclusion of the report, please note:
          -My tutor later informed me that Watermelon has not had enough scientific evidence to support it being a grade A supplement, it closer to grade B but between B+C ("Deserving of further research and could be considered for provision to athletes under a research protocol or case-managed monitoring situation." (AIS 2017))
          -This is not advice

          "According to the Australian Institute of Sport (2017), to be classified as a “Group A” supplement a product must be supported for specific use in sport, using “evidence based protocols”. It must also fit into a sub-category. As watermelon has been shown through multiple evidence based protocols to directly contribute to optimal performance, it would be most fitting to be assigned to the “Performance supplements” sub category. Given this, watermelon (or watermelon juice) would be most suited to the “Group A” supplement classification.
          Watermelon is an accessible, relatively affordable fruit that would assist in meeting the minimum nutritional requirements specified by the Australian Government (2015). Thus to consume the recommended two serves of fruit per day (standard serve size approx 150g), it would be suitable to consume watermelon as a part of a healthy diet (provided consumer has no allergies/negative reactions to consuming watermelon).
          For the purposes of reducing fluid loss to maintain performance and reduce cardiac stress, athletes could suitably consume 550g/mL of watermelon/watermelon juice 1 to 2 hours before an exercise session. Athletes who participate in sessions longer than 1 hour should consume 1200mL of water with 60g/hour of carbohydrates post workout, ideally consuming both fructose and glucose to maximise carbohydrate and glycogen uptake. An example of this could be 600mL water, 650g watermelon juice and 25g of a glycogen source (e.g. 34g of gummy bears).
          8g of citrulline has been shown to decrease muscle soreness by 40% and increase repetitions performed (pectoral contractions) and 6g of citrulline has been shown to increase growth hormone and concentrations of amino acids associated with muscle relaxation, resistance to fatigue, accelerated removal of lactic acid and improved performance due to Nitric Oxide synthesis. As, 500mL of natural watermelon juice contains 1.17g of L-citrulline it is not practical to suggest an athlete should consume approx 3.5L (equal to 8g citrulline) of watermelon juice to obtain the same level of citrulline. Instead an enriched citrulline watermelon juice or citrulline supplement could assist in reaching this level. However, 14.63% of participants noted discomfort in their stomach, so caution is advised in consuming this level of citrulline."

        •  

          @Sir Flabo:

          As I said, my findings were quite interesting and I learned a lot about the benefits of Watermelon/l-citrulline during this report. If you are also interested, I implore you do conduct your own research.

        • +1 vote

          @Sir Flabo: will have a look. Thanks,

      • +8 votes

        Fructose is the worst type of sugar for you, it causes the production of visceral fat, increases chance of heart disease, can cause non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and insulin resistance.

        The reason eating fruit is not as bad is because absorption within the liver is slowed down by the fibre content. When you down a glass of watermelon juice your greatly increasing the rate of absorption. There is no such thing as good sugar.

        • +1 vote

          By that logic consumption of too much of fruits is bad. I wonder what’s good then if fruits were bad.

        • +3 votes

          @virhlpool: Don't worry there will be a new study within 12 hours stating the bad foods are good and good foods are bad, then another 12 hours it'll be the other way around.

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          @virhlpool:

          No. As I've said it's when you drink a fruit as opposed to chewing and digesting it. You increase the amount processed by the liver at a given time, thus increasing the negative impact of fructose on the body.

          Further, it's a lot easier to drink your fruit than eat it so after two glasses you've consumed 1/2 a kilo of watermelon in one sitting. This would therefore increase the amount of fructose you are consuming. Same applies for orange juice, hell of a lot easier to drink 6 oranges at once than eat them.

        •  

          @virhlpool:
          By that logic consumption of too much of fruits is bad. I wonder what’s good then if fruits were bad

          my (limited) understanding:

          fructose is metabolised almost exclusively in the liver where it is converted to fat and stored in the liver for later use. when you eat fruit you get a smaller time-released dose from fruit as it is digested due to the fibre which is usually accompanies fruit. this is easier for your liver to process and utilise. with a drink you get a huge dose all at once. do that all the time and you will end up with a fatty liver. fat in the liver -> inflammation of the liver -> screwed up metabolism -> metabolic syndrome

          but yes, if you gorged on fruit i suspect there is no difference. but fruit intake is usually self-limiting (you feel full).

          iirc alcohol metabolism is almost identical to fructose metabolism

        •  

          @virhlpool: That is correct… in-fact the logic applies to anything.. too much Consumption of anything is bad (oxygen excluded?)

          So yea, there is such a thing as "too much fruit".

          Cheers!

        • +1 vote

          the reason eating fruit isn’t bad is because you need to chew it ( requires effort and time) so there is a limited amount you can eat ….. where as juice it’s easy to drink so people drink more …….

          hard to eat 6 apples in an hour, easy to drink the juice from 6 apples in a few minutes.

  •  

    It doesn't taste like watermelon juice. Has this weird artificial flavour to it

  • +9 votes

    Why not buy a fresh watermelon? Saw them at the market for 69c a kilo.

  • +8 votes

    was told by a friend this is the best drink on earth so bought one and tasted like shit went bought a watermelon thru it in my ozb purchased nutribullet and wow what a difference my opinion your choice

  •  

    Add water and apple juice to a rockmelon and blend. You have watermelon juice

  • +4 votes

    This stuff is terrible. My boyfriend and I couldn’t bring ourself to finish even one of the tiny cartons (it comes in lunch box sized ones too)

  •  

    Tastes better with vodka.

  • +1 vote

    Seeing these comments which I am absolutely in favour of, I fail to understand how most of the people still drink packaged orange juice of Tropicana and all other brands? It doesn’t taste like even anywhere close to the real oranges no matter what different brands write on it to market it. That shit still sells well. I hate it when even good airlines and reputed high-star hotels and restaurants give you shit from those bottles/Tetra Paks when you ask for orange juice assuming that at least there you would get real juice.

    •  

      Tropicana is an American brand of juice not even available in Australia

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        I meant similar brands that we all buy from grocery stores here. There’s no difference whatsoever as none tastes like real orange anyway.

    •  

      For me, although they don’t always taste like the real thing.. they still taste good.

      This watermelon drink tastes like watermelon that has started to go off.

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      I hate eating real oranges because the fibres get stuck between my teeth and they just have a wide range of taste. Most of them taste awful with the exception of some that are nice and sweet, but not worth the trouble of getting stuff stuck between my teeth. Maybe I've just bad at choosing oranges and maybe its the fact that my parents used to force me to have oranges with them when I didnt feel like it.

      OJ on the other hand, you know what it's going to taste like if you have bought similar brands before. But that's just me. I don't mind putting a real orange though the nutribullet though along with other fruits and vegetables.

  • +1 vote

    Classic post!
    The stars aligned watermelonjiuce! I cannot stop laughing 💗

  • +1 vote

    watermelon is $1 /kg at woolworths this week

  •  

    90c at Eastgardens - $1.20 at Bondi - suburb profiling!

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    it must be better than 'Chocolate Coconut water'. I bought that by mistake before when I needed the real 'Coconut Water' and it tasted horrible! anything must be better than 'Chocolate Coconut Water!'

    anyways $3.50 for a litre of that is still a bit pricey?? Give me some good ol' Orange Juice LOL

  •  

    72 votes, almost 50 -ve comments. Hmmm

  •  

    Taste like the proverbial

  •  

    A real ozbargan user would just grow their own watermelon and get free juice . It tastes much sweeter

    •  

      Nothing is free. You still need to pay for the seeds, and the soil and all the water that it will need in order to grow

  •  

    Not that watermelon is already 95% water with some sugar, I have no idea why they sell this rubbish except to market on lazy people cutting up a watermelon

  •  

    Had a holiday in Vietnam and every morning at the buffet breakfast they would make fresh watermelon juice. Tasted amazing. I'd never buy it from a carton though.

  •  

    This product exists because it’s a pretty good mixer for booze. That’s really it. It’s gross without vodka but with it, not so bad. Who’s blending up a watermelon at pre drinks? Nobody that’s coming back to my house anyway. Imagine a drunk person and a blender.

  •  

    I wanted to like this, but it's one of the worse beverages I've tasted in a long time. Horrible.

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