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Reusable Stainless Steel Straws, 4 for $5 or 12 for $13 Includes Shipping @ Keeo

117
weshipspring

Hi OzBargainers,

I have added a new range of stainless steel straws on my online store.

The stainless steel straws are a perfect alternative to plastic straws that pollute the oceans or paper straws.

The Stainless Steel is 304 graded (food grade).

You can buy 4 straws for $4 or 12 straws for $11 :) Free shipping on using 'WESHIPSPRING' at checkout!

Thank you!

Related Stores

Keeo
Keeo

closed Comments

  • +10

    4 straws for $4 or 12 straws for $12

    I love mafs.

    • +15

      If only there was a deal for 24 straws for $24…

  • -3

    Hard on the teeth and cold :(

    • +1

      Imperse in boiling water beforehand :)

    • +1

      Don’t chew it? Lol

    • +2

      Warm 'em up by sticking 'em up your….

      • Nose? Arm pit?

        • Ears, holes that meant to be for eye balls, wounds or wherever your imagination leads my friend.

  • Code doesn't work for free shipping with 4 or 12 straws in the cart.

    • Hi Boodee, can you try again? I have made some adjustments to the code, sorry about that :)

  • +2

    I thought Kmart was selling 4 of these for $3 as well as a cleaning brush

  • +2

    cleaning these will be a challenge i think…

  • +4

    Now this would be an excellent post if you included something that can clean the inside of these straws.

    • +7

      Fill your mouth with soapy water and suck and blow afew times.

      • +2

        Are we still talking about the straw?

        • With soapy water? Yeah I'd hope so….

        • +1

          I am a seedy seed rofl

      • +2

        suck and blow afew times.

        Just tried this, can confirm it works.

  • +2

    So your 4 straws for $4 does not include taxes, becomes $4.40 after taxes

    I think its illegal to exclude taxes from advertised price?

    • +1

      Even the free shipping is calculated on the ex tax total. $75 gets free shipping, add $13.20 of straws and $63 left for free shipping.

    • Correct, unless it’s a B2B model.

  • +1

    Cheaper on GearBest (8 straws, 2 cleaning brushes) for $6.50 + $1.59 shipping

    • Does GB collect tax?

  • +7

    I bought some stainless steel straws via Groupon in the past, but found that they were too narrow and difficult to clean. David Jones set came with a cleaning brush which broke (returned for refund).

    I'll give one of these a go, but it is definitely the final straw.

    • +1

      I have tempered glass ones …nice thing is you can see if dirty inside, very tough, no issues as yet.
      Got them as freebie at a food show, the guys reckon when they hit mainstream in Australia would be $1.50 per straw, mouth feel wise, we are used to drinking from glass.

  • Any Bargains, can buy for cheaper.

  • +1

    Have one of this, and not very comfortable as the tips can be quite sharp. A silicone / bamboo straws is a better options.

    Did a amazon search, and lots of them came up. Few of them provides free shipping as well.

    https://www.amazon.com.au/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%...

  • +1

    I dont quite get how people would use these…are they gonna whip them out of their bags after they bought like a boost juice or something? then when finished just put it back into their bags which will be all sticky and wet? how about the disposable cups being used?

    • +3

      Just rinse them under the tap.

      • the tap

    • It's pretty straightforward really.

      And a no-brainer if you give a half of a shit about the planet.

      Or you could - maybe - not use a straw?

      • +4

        I'm also tired of the 'I'd rather people think for me because I'm lazy' attitude.

  • +1

    I find these impart a metallic taste to my drinks. Glass straws are way better.

  • +4

    Did no one search on Aliexpress? Depends on the quantity, some are down to 20c each including shipping.

    4 Straight, 4 Bent, 2 cleaning brushes, inc. postage $4.11 ($4.52inc GST)

  • +1

    Awesome, people can pretend they're doing something to help the earth as they do almost nothing at all.

    Oh well, at least there'll be a few grams less plastic as human civilisation is destroyed by climate change. I'm sure having avocados in the supermarket all year round was worth the entire civilisation.

    • +8

      So your attitude is - this doesn't do much so why bother doing anything at all?

      You sound like an American gun advocate.

      What this whole straw thing is doing is really bringing the issue of single use plastics to the attention of the general populace.

      It's changing peoples' attitudes to unnecessary consumption and waste.

      Here we are discussing it as a result.

      • So your attitude is - this doesn't do much so why bother doing anything at all?

        This is actually perfectly valid, though it sounds better if put as: "It's better to do nothing and force actually effective changes, than to pay lip service and sap public sentiment for ineffective changes."

        Psychologically, if people think they're doing something good, it takes away motivation from doing other good acts (basically we have an in-built quota for how much good we feel we need to do). If that quota is wasted in ineffective moves like this, it saps motivation from actually useful changes.

        • +2

          If people want to do good they will. If they dont, they wont.

          Never heard that I stop doing good even though I would want to simply because my quota is up.

        • -1

          @rdhupar:

          Never heard that I stop doing good even though I would want to simply because my quota is up.

          Really? Easy example:

          If you see a busker on the street - are you more or less likely to throw them $5 if you've already given another busker $10 just a few minutes before?

          This is (almost basic) psychology. In other contexts it's known as using up "political capital", "public goodwill", "public appetite" etc.

        • @HighAndDry:

          Psychologically, if people think they're doing something good, it takes away motivation from doing other good acts (basically we have an in-built quota for how much good we feel we need to do). If that quota is wasted in ineffective moves like this, it saps motivation from actually useful changes.

          Do you have anything to back this up?

          My hunch is that raising general awareness of these issues will influence other, related behaviour.

        • @pigferret: Raising awareness, yes. Taking ineffective actions? No.

          And when I said it was almost basic psychology I wasn't lying, this has been known for a long time:

          http://www.psych.nyu.edu/gollwitzer/09_Gollwitzer_Sheeran_Se...

          When other people take notice of one’s identity-relevant behavioral
          intentions, one’s performance of the intended behaviors
          is compromised.

          (…)

          Other people’s taking notice of one’s identity-relevant intentions
          apparently engenders a premature sense of completeness regarding
          the identity goal.

          This ties in very closely to virtue-signalling, which is effectively telling others how good a person you are, without actually being one: It decreases the underlying psychological impetus to actually be a good person, because it's already served the same goal: gaining social or self approval.

        • @HighAndDry:

          Thanks for that.

          Do you think implementing/promoting [somewhat effective measure] and then later implementing [much more effective measure] would be of less benefit than waiting to implement [much more effective measure] and bypassing [somewhat effective measure] altogether?

          I mean, like rdhupar's point - it isn't a do it once and never again action, surely?

          I get the point around virtue signalling.

          But just because that behaviour exists in many - does it outweigh the potential benefits (including raising awareness)?

        • -1

          I understand your viewpoint, but it's ultimately the mindset of human beings which hinder the evolution in environmental movements such as cutting down/out the unnecessary consumption of single-use plastics, as well as reducing use of print paper/toners etc.

          Some people are just lazy, and if they can scrape by in life by doing the bare-minimum, they can and will - as was proven by the recent ban of plastic bags by Woolworths/Coles, grown political-voting adults were wailing and carrying on for days on end on social media as if someone had taken their first born or one of their limbs, simply because that's something they've always done and it was too hard to change that behaviour.

          There should be no capacity limit on doing good, as if we're pre-programmed to only care a certain amount, you should act the best you can be until you no longer can physically or mentally.

        • +1

          @pigferret:

          Do you think implementing/promoting [somewhat effective measure] and then later implementing [much more effective measure] would be of less benefit than waiting to implement [much more effective measure] and bypassing [somewhat effective measure] altogether?

          Yes, because the implementation of the [somewhat effective measure] will diminish uptake of the [much more effective measure] down the line. Obviously there will be a break-even point depending on the differences in effectiveness, initial uptake, decrease in future uptake, and other factors, but it's far better to start with the [much more effective measure], don't you think?

        • +1

          @HighAndDry:

          I think this is really interesting, thanks for making me reconsider my views on this.

          I'd love to see some more real science on this - but unfortunately this is ultimately all entwined with electioneering.

        • +1

          @pigferret: Happy to have helped. I think it's always good to double check things even if they seem logically or intuitively true - that's why there's a lot of science devoted to arguably "duh" subjects, because sometimes a combination of factors can combine to cause counter-intuitive outcomes.

          And added to that, it's always good to be skeptical (not to the point of inaction) of anything which is pushed or advocated strongly by one group or another. All groups are comprised of people, and people always have an agenda. In the case of businesses and companies, profit-motive is ever present. It doesn't mean they can't do good - sometimes the cost of doing good delivers returns in terms of PR/competitive-advantage/etc, but if there's a way to reap those returns with minimal costs, you can bet companies will take that route instead.

    • https://news.nationalgeographic.com/2017/04/plastic-straws-o...
      Americans alone use 500 million straws daily, according to the National Park Service.

      Every little bit helps, every effort has some impact regardless of whether you are there to witness it. Maybe one day we won't demand avocados all year round either.

  • -1

    Of all the plastic bans recently, the straws one is the biggest joke. So Woolies and Coles decide to stop selling their own homebrand straws, but still choose to sell the Deko brand straws (and at much higher cost than 1c/straw)…. But that isn't even the biggest issue. The straws that end up littering the oceans and environment in general AREN'T the ones come from the shelves of Woolies and Coles, instead they're the ones coming from fast food joints or other take away mobs. You reckon those places are gonna stop using plastic straws anytime soon?…. I wouldn't be counting on it…

    • +5

      all of it contributes, doesnt matter if its fast food or the 100 packs from the supermarket.

      where i live its a daily shame to see the plastics that wash up and make the beach/ocean unsightly.

      be grateful for the beaches you have and do your best communally to ensure beaches stay clean and beautiful everywhere in the world.

    • +3

      That's just not true about Coles and Woolworths, they're just liquidating existing stock. Once they run out, that'll be it.

      McDonalds are phasing out plastic straws by 2020. (http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-07-19/mcdonalds-australia-to...)

      Do some research.

      • my local maccas already has paper straws, OK for softdrinks, but might be tricky for thick shakes, but I drink those straight from the cup anyway.

  • -3

    I think these are dangerous. You could get seriously hurt if one of these things got stuck into the top of your mouth. (in a fall or collison while drinking)

    • +10

      Makes you wonder how we haven't killed ourselves off with all of the metal forks and spoons we've been using for centuries.

      • +1

        To be fair you dont generally walk around and eat a piece of steak or drink a bowl of hot soup…just saying…

        • +1

          Sure, maybe you don't.

          Savage.

        • To be fair you dont generally walk around and eat a piece of steak or drink a bowl of hot soup

          Speak for yourself, I've taken eating soup to a whole new level of productivity, son!

    • Stick some in the ground under a tree and this might happen…

  • +1

    More water usage vs keeping the fish alive

  • +2

    What grade stainless

    • +2

      Hi, these are SS 304. Food grade Stainless Steel :)

  • Are these straws baby-turtle-safe?

    • No, not big enough to suck up baby turtles.

      • Based on Scab's advice I would say the baby turtle's are safe.

      • Challenge: accepted

  • Aren't we in the middle of a drought? And yet we should waste more water washing these?

    • Agree! Washing is such a wasteful exercise. Hello Nimbin!

    • Username checks out.

  • Just buy paper straws

    • …if you need them.

  • I wonder if they make them half the length and nostril size…

  • -1

    I don't mind people using metal or paper straws if they want to, options are great, but so long as nobody tries to take my choices away. For me it's plastic straws all the way. Having said that, I almost never use straws as there truly is little need for them.

    People absolutely should be trying to use less straws, but for me (40 hours working, 3 young kids, no time for myself), metal/paper isn't worth the time investment.

    I'm just not going to waste my time cleaning metal straws. And paper straws are crap (go soggy).

    If we had a 4 day work week I'd happily start doing a lot more optional stuff. But then that's less effective for the rest of society than letting me get on with my real job for an extra day per week. Serious. What I do in one week saves alot more in emissions than use of straws over my whole lifetime will ever wholistically (eg including fauna impact) cost.

    Maybe cleaning metal straws could be a new thing on work for the dole.

    As a side note I'm an avid recycler, community composter, buy nothing supporter, op shop clothing buyer. IMHO there's alot more work to be done and priorities are all wrong. The processing side (eg: soft plastics not requiring special trips to coles) that I can't believe is lagging so pathetically. Reducing consumption is great, but people who want plastics banned entirely are taking it too far.

    End rant.

    • +2

      Can you please tell me more about how your life is so tough?

      • Gladly. PM sent.

        :P

      • -1

        Yet has time to go on a rant to randoms on OzB

        • 5min vs much longer.. Make statements that make sense

  • Deposit scheme. $1 per plastic straw. Non claimed money goes to environment programs. No more problem.

  • I’ll wait for xiaomi straws - self sterilizing

  • Ikea sell re-useable plastic straws for 1.99 for 6. I bought them for cocktails as they could be cut in half for shorter glass and cute: they are stripy with 3 different colours.

    • What makes the straws that Ikea sell any more reusable then a normal plastic straw?

      • They are a thick plastic, not the disposable ones