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Arlec 20W Twin Security LED Floodlight with Motion Activation - Black $20 (Was $34.90) @ Bunnings

710

These modern integrated LED floodlight with over 1600 lumens of light output. The adjustable twin head and 90 degree beam angle allow you to direct the light precisely. Featuring a detection range of 10 metres through 180˚ making it the perfect addition for your home security needs.

  • 20W, 1600lm Integrated LED floodlight
  • Fully adjustable lamp head
  • IP44 Rated
  • Detection angle 180˚
  • Detection Range 10m
  • High Impact UV stabilised plastic
  • Model: MAL400

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closed Comments

  • +2 votes

    Next week at ALDI….

  • +4 votes

    I have had floodlights before (before LED). Now I have "normal" outside light fittings with a motion sensor, which I put a 14W Phillips LED bulb in (1440 Lumens I think). It looks a whole lot nicer than one of those plastic floodlight contraptions, and the amount of light is very comparable (better distribution of light around the garden actually).

  •  

    Can anyone please explain why Xiaomi smart plug will never work on security light like this?

    I tried to set a timer to disable the lights for certain time of the day.

    •  

      Surely if the thing doesn't get power it won't work?

      You may need to be more clear on "will never work".

      •  

        Yeah I'm guessing the smart plug cuts the power so the motion sensor won't work…

        I use the Philips Hue smart lights and have just a normal smart bulb plus their motion detector… that way I can control the light with my phone/voice and also it acts as a security light with the motion sensor. But the light needs power the whole time to work. Smart plug can just control a light on/off with your phone/smart home.

        Good luck!

        • -1 vote

          If you use the Smart Plug to bypass the Motion sensor (connect them in parallel) you can have either the smart plug or the motion sensor switch on the light.

    •  

      I tried to set a timer to disable the lights for certain time of the day.

      Just get a sensor with an ambient light sensor in it. That way the lights won't come on if the ambient light is above a set level.

      If that's what you are trying to do.

    •  

      they have a sensor that turns the light off in the daytime

    •  

      Because it has a sensor attached to control the lights, you need to get a non sensor version

  • +2 votes

    Have this from a previous deal. They're good, but after a year or two the plastic starts to break off due to exposure to sun.

    •  

      Thanks for that, might get a can of clear gloss paint that's UV resistant

    • +3 votes

      Hit it with 303 Aerospace Protectant once it’s installed.

  •  

    Need a sparky to wire in I guess.
    I have an outside light which is switched on/off inside. How does this work with a sensor light? What will the off/on do? Keep the light turned on all the time? Keep it off all the time?

    • +3 votes

      Yes it’s a wired connection, not a 🔌

      Leave it on if you want it to sense. It has a daylight sensor to prevent working when not required. Switching is done in the sensor. You can probably toggle the switch a couple of time to have always-on.

      • +2 votes

        If you switch off and on quick it stays on, to reset to timer then turn it off for a couple of minutes.

        •  

          If you switch it on and off and back on within 10 seconds then the lights stay on, let it go further then a 10 second count the lights go to sensor mode.

    • -2 votes

      Technically yes but there's only two wires so pretty easy to swap out as long as you turn the safety off. Otherwise get a sparky*

    • +1 vote

      You could also add a flexible lead and plug it in, if safe from weather.

      •  

        Adding a flexible lead also needs to be done by a sparky 😉

        •  

          You must be joking. Or we are a laughing stock.
          Which state ?

          • +4 votes

            @manic: We are a laughing stock - it’s all states AFAIK.

            Apparently1, it also used to require an sparky to change a light bulb in Victoria prior to 1999.


            1. https://www.energymakeovers.com.au/blog/iillegal-change-light-bulb-victoria/ 

          • +2 votes

            @manic: The only exemption is the eastern most state…..NZ.

            • +2 votes

              @Steptoe: In NZ it requires 2 sparkies, 3 French hens and a partridge in a pear tree.
              👬🐔🐔🐔🦅🍐🌳
              (Addendum: We are short on partridges today).

    • +5 votes

      These types of sensor lights all work in the same way:

      • With the switch off, the lights will stay off.
      • When you then turn the switch on, the lights turn on in automatic mode (i.e. they will eventually turn off, and then proceed to turn on and off automatically depending on light level, motion detection and variable/minimum/fixed timer length).
      • If the switch is on, toggling it off then back on again within a short time (typically about 2 seconds) will override the automatic mode and the lights will remain on constantly.
      • Turning the switch off for at least 10-15 seconds, then turning it back on will revert the lights to automatic mode.
      • If the switch is initially off, you can turn on the lights in manual mode by turning the switch on, then toggling it off then back on again within about 2 seconds (i.e. on-off-on in rapid succession).

      I couldn’t find the manual for the Arlec MAL400 online, but I'm assuming the timings are the same as for the MAL413 which are a minimum 15 second switch off time for automatic mode and a maximum 2 second off/on toggle period for manual mode.

      Notes:

      • Some other Arlec sensor floodlights have only a 10 second minimum switch off time, so the MAL400's minimum time might be 10 seconds instead, or even some other similar amount.
      • The 2 second maximum toggle period might also be slightly different.

      Would anyone who has bought the lights care to share the exact values from the manual?

  • +7 votes

    The version with replaceable screw-in PAR38 type lamps is an extra $5

    https://www.bunnings.com.au/20w-led-twin-sensor-security-lig...

    •  

      So the ones the OP listed are not replaceable lamps?

      •  

        No, not replaceable

        •  

          So then what do you do when it eventually dies out? buy a new one?

  •  

    Anyone know if this is a cool white or a warm white led?

    • +2 votes

      Mine was cool white, although I didn't go searching to see if warm white was an available option

  • +1 vote

    I have this exact light at home.

    I would not recommend it, the sensor is terrible - only works when you're extremely close to the light.

    • +1 vote

      Same with mine, seems to only pickup things within 3 metres.

      •  

        Yet Mother's picks up on cars passing in the street. I think it spooks the dealer neighbour's customers though. Recently installed security cameras also do their fair share of spooking too.

        Perhaps the others sensors need cleaning to improve their sensitivity.

  • +1 vote

    I would avoid these.

    Purchased a set a few weeks ago, paid a sparky mate in beer to install it… was faulty. Returned to bunnings, replaced them with another set, sparky back… faulty again. Returned to Bunnings and paid a bit more, got a set that is now installed and working fine.

    These just keep getting cheaper for a reason, they are very poorly built.

    •  

      Sad, you got unlucky. Mine worked straight away and I did a DIY install. Simple replacement of my old one that broke

      •  

        Yup, could be. First set didn't detect anything (unless you waved in front of it) and the second flickered.

      • -2 votes

        its not DIY, as its hardwired, you have just technically done illegal electrical work at your home if your not licensed electrician

        • +2 votes

          are you the police or something? better lock him up :D

          •  

            @IllBuyThat4aDolla: Just stating the facts, i not a fan of it, but its just how it is

            • +2 votes

              @asa79: and you think the person you replied to didn't know this already?

              No ones stopping you from paying an electrician a couple hundred to turn of the safety switch and screw in 2 wires. If someone wants to do it themselves what is it to you?

              • -2 votes

                @IllBuyThat4aDolla: well you can save money on both the electrician and your home insurance repayments ;)

                •  

                  @asa79: Sorry your scaremongering about insurance doesn't work on me.

                  If it makes you sleep better tonight, you've probably scared a few other people on here with your insurance talk.

                  •  

                    @IllBuyThat4aDolla: Good luck arguing with your insurance company that there fine print doesn't matter to you ;)

                    •  

                      @asa79: Lol your assuming I have something to be worried about.

                    •  

                      @asa79: I don't have home insurance, so happy to DIY install and take full responsibility. No fine print breaking here. I believe in having savings and having 'self insurance'

                      • -2 votes

                        @nightqueen: Guess that makes you cool hey?

                        •  

                          @asa79: Not cool at all, I feel that insurance companies make fat margins off ordinary people and home insurance also gets a significant stamp duty tax too.

                          • -2 votes

                            @nightqueen: So you probsbly drive on the road with no insurance because your special

                            •  

                              @asa79: I have the compulsory green slip insurance, won't bother with the comprehensive insurance as my car isn't worth much at all.

        •  

          I DIY most of my electrical.

          We're talking a couple of wires when changing a light fitting.

          You'd have to be a special kind of stupid to mess it up.

          Just turn the circuit off before working on it if you're afraid of lighting yourself up

          •  

            @Cheapo Moose: I know that but you live in a nanny state that you have just voided your home insurance by advertising that

            https://www.youi.com.au/youi-news/will-diy-electrical-work-a...

            Insurance companies wont pay out if they don't have to, so just gotta find one bit of DIY to void the whole thing

            • +4 votes

              @asa79: because youi is going to come across this forum post and work out SpottyMoose is one of their customers :D

              •  

                @IllBuyThat4aDolla: SpottyMoose is on the black list now 😂😂

              • -2 votes

                @IllBuyThat4aDolla: All insurance providers employ investigation teams to recoup money. So yea, they will probably come across your post

                •  

                  @asa79: Good, I hope they read my post history on ozb so they know Im a cheapskate and like to chase a bargain.

                  Have a good day sir!

            •  

              @asa79: Depending what scaremongering you read, apparently if there is ever a fatal electrical accident involved, they'll actually investigate it quite thoroughly. Like someone dies touching your inappropriately wired and earthed light fitting or something.

              Don't get me wrong I don't agree with the rule either. Just one of the reasons I've read for it being that way. Maybe it wouldn't be an issue if the tradie rates weren't on average so ridiculous.

          • +1 vote

            @Cheapo Moose: Funny you say that. I once heard this funny story from one of these special people.

            A coworker of mine from back in the day tried to fix a power point in his room. He explained he thought the power was off when the light switch was off, after removing the screws and touching the wires he got a large electrical shock all the way up his arm. I had a good laugh but at the same time was amazed at how thick some people are

            • +2 votes

              @DannyBoy: When I was a child I accidentally stuck my fingers in a bulbless rear light fitting on a sewing machine. Thought I was going to die for weeks after, but still told no one.

          •  

            @Cheapo Moose: Also not only is there insurance, but you also setting yourself up for fines

            https://www.worksafe.qld.gov.au/injury-prevention-safety/ele...
            What are the penalties?
            Apart from injury or death, DIY electrical work is regarded as unlicensed electrical work, which is illegal, and has penalties of up to $40,000 for individuals.

            A breach that exposes an individual to a risk of death or serious injury or illness attracts a maximum penalty of $600,000 for an individual ($3,000,000 for a corporation) or five years imprisonment.

            • +3 votes

              @asa79: Yeah thanks for letting me know but I'll continue doing basic electrical work.

              I've discovered work done by licensed electricians that's dodgy AF.

              You can hop off your soapbox.

              • +1 vote

                @Cheapo Moose: I have to agree with you. I too have seen unbelievably shoddy work done by licensed sparkles!

              • +1 vote

                @Cheapo Moose: Oh wait so your not worried that the 2 wires you screwed into the screw terminal of the outdoor lights that an electrician would have done exactly the same way is going to catch fire and burn your whole house down?
                😂😂😂

                I bet this guy is fun to chat to at parties

        • +1 vote

          One can get a plug put on and plug it in

          • -1 vote

            @DisabledUser266835: You will still need an electrician to attach a plug so you can plug it in

            •  

              @asa79: I don't , but one might have to ask a sparky friend. Will take 2 minutes, if you supply the cable. Cut it off an old TV or something like that. Wire it into the light . Clamp the cable in the cable clamp.
              Strip off the outer sheath. You will have a brown and blue cable. Once the outer sheath has been carefully stripped, the bare copper cable should be twisted, or some terminal lugs used. One should consider there is no bare wire when the copper is inserted into the connector strip.

              The electrician will then have to screw the two ends in.

              Blue to blue and brown to brown, probably 2 minutes work by the time they screw it back together.

              • -1 vote

                @DisabledUser266835: https://www.youi.com.au/youi-news/will-diy-electrical-work-a...
                So what is classed as electrical work? Basically, it’s any work involving electricity, such as:

                Installing a power point
                Replacing a light switch
                Repairing an electrical appliance
                Replacing a plug on a lead
                Installing a ceiling fan
                Rewiring a room
                Installing an air conditioner.

                • +3 votes

                  @asa79: I’m not going to get involved in the DIY/nanny state debate. (All I can say is: we must have especially dangerous electricity compared to the UK and New Zealand 😉.)

                  I’d just like to point out a major bit of "fake news" from that youi web page:

                  Electricity kills — unlike in the USA, where electricity is only 110 volts, Australia uses 240 volts of electricity, which is easily enough to kill you.

                  I’m sorry but there’s no practical difference between the lethality of 110 volts and 240 volts. What kills is current and duration. In theory, even a 9V battery could kill.

                  So to imply that the reason we in OZ are not allowed to DIY electrical work but those in the US are allowed to is that 240V is "dangerous" whilst 110V is "safe" is complete bollocks!

                  •  

                    @robinCTS: It's actually came from the unions making sure the jobs are only done by the people with the qualifications

                  • +1 vote

                    @robinCTS: But good luck arguing that with an insurance company if you need to claim ;)

                    •  

                      @asa79: But, Your Honour, the entire premise of the exemption in the insurance policy is based on the alleged fact that DIY would be allowed if our voltage were as safe as the 110V in the USA.

                      Since all my expert witnesses have attested that 240V is indeed as safe as 110V, that clause is null and void and thus the defendant has no standing to refuse the payout.

                      :P

                  •  

                    @robinCTS:

                    I’m sorry but there’s no practical difference between the lethality of 110 volts and 240 volts. What kills is current and duration. In theory, even a 9V battery could kill.

                    Exactly this!

                    That article sounds like it was posted by an intern at youi!

                    All that matters is what your insurance company's PDS says for the insurance product you've purchased.

    •  

      Similar experience - had to replace these lights immediately after installation as the sensor wouldn't work at all. The replacement lights worked ok to begin with and then after a couple of months, the sensor started not working on random occasions.

      This post has reminded me to finally get it replaced - which sensor lights did you get that finally worked properly?

    •  

      Mine work fine. Happy with the sensitivity, though others may not be. Mine is installed about 3m high and can sense to around 5-7m away.

  •  

    Anyone have any recommendations on something similar but battery powered and solar charged? Looking to light a dark corner of the backyard and carport

    •  

      You'll never get close to the brightness with solar but bunnings has these solar/motion lights: https://www.bunnings.com.au/arlec-black-ritter-sensor-solar-...

      the top of the light is a solar panel so you'll want to install it in a place that gets lots of sun throughout the day.

      •  

        Thanks, I'll have a look into them

        I'm not too concerned with brightness just need enough light to get to the switch in the carport if I need proper light

        •  

          these type are good. You can buy them on ebay for ~$8 each

          It has a very dim always-on light, and then a brighter light when motion is detected.

          edit: looks like make it so beat me to the punch

      •  

        Any solar lights I got from Bunnings were landfill within weeks or months. The panels die, the housing dies and the battery dies.

        This this type instead. Easily found on eBay or Aliexpress. They have a lithium battery and are very bright. Mine has lasted over a year so far, and still works great.

    •  

      Didn't want to fork out for a sparky so ended up buying this recently:
      https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/22-LED-Solar-Dual-Light-Lamp-Flo...

      It replaced a bunch of small solar lights (like the above comment). Brighter than those but yeah won't be as bright as proper mains floodlights. Plenty to walk and be able to open the door and whatever else though.

      Only got it recently so no idea on longevity.

  •  

    +++++++ I installed a few of these when they were first released, still good well worth the cash

  • +1 vote

    Thanks NC, got one. Did an easy swap over to my old single bulb (no sensor) light. It was a hard wired one as well and the previous fitting had the same holes in the brick as this one. Easy as, new light installed in 15 minutes! Cheers bud.

  • +1 vote

    As an alternative for a similar price (although shipping may add if you don't have Prime), I really like these: https://www.amazon.com.au/Motion-Waterproof-Security-Floodli...

    I liked them so much I got 4. They produce plenty of light for a smaller area and are warm white, which I prefer.