Renogy SMART Lithium-Iron Phosphate Battery 12 Volt 100A⋅h $699 AUD Shipped (Pre-Order) @ Renogy AU

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This won't appeal to many but it's a good price if you are after a LiFePO4 12v battery. Stock arrives around Jan 20th apparently. (Note: You will need a suitable 14.4v charger for this) Review here https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aahHWaV6Zdk

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Comments

  • +1 vote

    (Note: You will need a suitable 14.4v charger for this)

    If you want it to last for a long time, you should charge to 14.1V and then disconnect. 14.4V is too high for LFP.

    •  

      Or everyone can read the spec sheet that states a nominal voltage of 12.8V.

    •  

      I'm just going on the spec sheet, but yes lower termination voltage does increase cycle life.

      • +1 vote

        In general yes, but specifically 14.4V permanently depletes LFP capacity very quickly.

        The spec sheets are written to support the "drop-in AGM replacement" market, not the whats actually good for the cells market.

        Most people who care about their investment are using around 14.1V bulk charge these days.

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          My understanding is that LiFePO4 is very tolerant to overcharging compared to LiCo https://www.powerstream.com/LLLF.htm

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            @Stevesie76: Yes its not going to catch fire, its the safest of the lithiums. But in real world usage, early adopters who have spent very large sums of money on LFP systems, and used the recommended "drop-in-replacement" settings from the manufacturers, have found that 14.4V will cause a depletion of cell capacity. Like losing 20% capacity in one year, before changing to 14.1V (or lower) and preventing any further degradation. The difference in full charge capacity between 14.1V and 14.4V is negligible anyway, so its just not worth the risk.

            Float voltages are also a big problem. Drop-in suggests that 13.7V float is fine for LFP, when in reality no amount of float voltage is good. A lot of equipment/applications need a float voltage, so it has been found that the lower the float the better. I use 13.3V on mine. 13.7V float (and 14.4V charge) can cause permanent plating of the cathodes or something, which can't ever be undone.

  •  

    Just curious what do most people use this for?

    EDIT: Looks like for caravans etc?

    •  

      They are made as a drop-in replacemnet for old AGM deep-cycle lead-acid batteries.

      New systems are probably better off using regular li-ion.

      •  

        No they aren't, no way I'm sleeping in something with a huge chinese li-ion being charged.

        • +3 votes

          LiFePo is incredibly stable - it's a way better alternative to Li-ion, unless you are concerned about weight.

        •  

          Throw out all the laptops!

          You might mean LiPo, I wouldn't trust those.

          LiIon I've seen put through HELL (just look at vapers!) They are pretty damn stable, and if one goes up, they're unlikely to take their peers.

          A simple metal box and fire blanket are enough in my experience to protect from LiIon, and I screw around with them a LOT.

    • +1 vote

      A couple of these would make for a very cheap diy powerwall, rather than liIon canister cells.

      Arguably safer too.

    • +1 vote

      Yes, caravans and motorhomes.

    •  

      Thanks for the link - interesting they are using pouch cells.
      Still waiting for LifePo4 batteries to come down to a reasonable price - this isn’t it

    • +2 votes

      Yes need it for serial mouse.

    • +1 vote

      I would not trust either of those.

      I bought a couple of so called 100/130ah batteries with that kind of branding and they were all around 7kg and half the capacity when tested.

      The renogy is a bit more reputable if its genuine.

      •  

        Lately 'new distributors' have been adding thick glass plates and rocks (yes, rocks of the garden variety) in the battery case to increase weight to fool the savvy bargain-hunters into thinking they're getting the full amount of Lithium.

    •  

      Where are the detailed specs on the website - I can't seem to find the Maximum Discharge Current figure?

  • +1 vote

    I think the smarts allow for paralleling if these units and keeping the cells all in balance, but you can't series these for 24V if that's your need.

  •  

    If I was paying this sort of $$ for a battery, it makes sense to get a charger that can manage these batteries - eg the Victron Blue Smart 12|25 which can handle LiFePO₄ batteries (won't try the recondition cycle which isn't very good for the BMS). Price seems good, not necessarily a "bargain"?

  • +1 vote

    Pity the cells are from the radio control industry and there's so many of them. I fails = end of battery.
    Real Lithium batteries use 4 x prismatic cells in series.

    How many amps does it output before it shuts down?
    The last 2 I tested (Both 120 amps) shat themselves after delivering 85-90 amps.

    What is the maximum instantaneous current it can deliver ?

    For those not happy about not being able to series Lithium batteries, don't make a fool of yourself, it's not possible.
    If you want 24v or 36v, you need to buy a 24v or 36v battery.
    You get what you pay for.

    •  

      You can of course put them in series if you add some electronics to keep them balanced, similar to the internal manager.
      Not very elegant or efficient to have two levels of BMS though.

  •  

    You can get a SolarKing 100AH lithium battery which is better quality and can be wired in series (Renogy cannot) from Rockby for $678.

    https://www.rockby.com.au/searchresSql_12.cfm?select=3&subco...

    Specs here: https://www.solarking.net.au/batteries/solarking-lithium-bat...

    •  

      No they can't - unless of course they have an external 8 cell BMS and connections to each individual cell in each battery via an external connector to keep it balanced during charge and discharge.

      There's nothing like a campfire engineer to help you tear up your cash.

      •  

        As per the manual, SolarKing batteries can be wired in series or parallel and have an internal BMS. There's no mention of an external BMS being required.

  • -2 votes

    Can I put them in my Tesla model S?

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