• long running

2.6kg CO2 Cylinder (Full) $66.95 + Delivery (Pick up VIC) @ Kegland

760

Very good price for a full gas cylinder. I just bought one along with the Sodastream connection. Couldn't find any under $100 around Brisbane.

They're located in Melbourne and it was $20 for delivery.

EDIT: They also have a 6kg bottle for $99 which is more economical but it's overkill to have that in your house.

Mod: Previous long running deal (duplicate exception, older than 6 months).

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Comments

  • So how many bottles of SodaStream can this unit refill?

  • Why limit it to CO2? We can use helium to bubblify our drinks and then when you drink it it makes your voice squeaky

    • +1 vote

      You can buy helium tanks for $40 from big W. But unfortunately since helium is lighter than air the water won't become fizzy and you won't sound like a chipmunk.

      • I was being silly lol but why does it have anything to do with the fact that helium is lighter than air? I thought the reason why the water won't become fizzy if you pump helium through is because helium does not dissolve in water nearly as well as CO2.

        Obviously it won't make your voice squeaky either because you're not inhaling it and it doesn't interact with your voice box.

      • Density has nothing to do with fizzing the water, only the sounding like a chipmunk part. It's all related to the H2CO3 <-> H2O + CO2 relationship.

    • start a business n serve the ozb community!

  • So how do you get these tanks refilled after its empty

    • Most home brew shops do a refill. Mine charges $26 which gives an equivalent cost per small (400gm) cylinder of ~$4.
      cf ~$19 for a refill (exchange) cylinder at the supermarket.
      OR 6c/lt instead of 30c/lt for the soda water. The initial setup costs are recovered after the first 2.6kg refill.
      Definitely a REAL OZB

      • Sydney's rate is about $36. Bleh

      • I read ages ago that some smaller homebrew shops wouldnt refill "kegland" gear.. mostly because they were an online retailer that undercuts them…

        Ever experienced that?

        • Yep I had this problem (Sydney). I went to my local brew shop franchise and they (politely) flat out refused to refill Kegland bottles as they undercut the market.

          They will only refill or do a bottle swap for KegKing branded bottles.

          Seemed a bit ridiculous to me if you have a paying customer giving you business. Just seemed like they were living in the 1990's trying to force people to pay a premium when you can get it a lot cheaper elsewhere, but meh, their business model.

          • @Saiya: Most fire extinguiser places do refills as well.
            Alot of homebrew places do changeover cause they don`t have facilities to refill.

    • Cheaper to do it with dry ice.

  • Refilling the suckers seems to be ~$10/kg from what I've seen so I ended up with BOC's $79.99 plan: 6kg cylinder with an included refill.

    • What's the deal with this BOC plan?

      Can you post a link.

      Thanks

        • Thanks for sharing the link. How do you connect the BOC ones to a sodastream? Can you use the KegLand connector hose, for example?

          • @thedweller: Yep and it works a treat! I have a 6kg cylinder in a corner cabinet piped through to a Sodastream up on top of the bench using the Kegland adaptor/hose kit. I'm now 210 charges in and still no signs of it even starting to lose pressure :) If my calcs are correct I should get up around 600 before needing a refill.

  • Can I use this to go scuba diving?
    I don't need to go deep.

  • I was looking into this 2 months ago and it's the same price as it was. I'm planning on getting 2 @ $56 each to share with soemone else.

  • What is it for.

    • +15 votes

      Carbon offset / sequestration.

      Just bury it in the garden / store in the kitchen.

    • Carbonating drinks like soda stream or kegs of beer.

      • Wait a second… Beer is carbonated manually??

        • In 90% of commercial beer production the answer is yes.

        • Yes and the c02 canister creates the pressure to dispense the beer from the keg to the tap. I keg my home brew, no way I’m going back to bottling it is such a pain washing, sanitizing And capping all the bottles. You also get to drink your beer way sooner.

        • I home brew beer and when I was bottling I would use priming sugar to naturally carbonate the beer. This has the side effect of leaving yeast sediment behind.

          Now that I keg beer everything is force carbonated with co2. While it costs a little more the end result is a better beer.

          • @Yawhae: hardly the place for this, but cold crashing before bottling, no?
            Still leaves behind sediment… but that doesn't happen at all with kegging?

            • @anawth: Technically you will get sediment either way. However when you carbonate using priming sugars you give the yeast something to feed off and thus multiply, which effectively creates much more sediment.

              When force carbonating there isn't really anything left for the yeast assuming the wort has been fully fermented out.

              I can't say I ever had a problem carbonating after cold crashing when bottling.

    • I use mine for my high light aquarium. Makes the plants grow crazy fast and compact.

  • Thanks. Bought one for the aquarium…

  • I have the 6kg bottle and $15 filling adaptor. I just leave the bottle in the shed and refill the original whenever I need to.
    I'd thought about getting the 2.6kg, but the 6kg works out far cheaper over the long run. Paid $124 inc shipping to Brisbane.

  • I got the 6kg and sell refills to friends for $10 each.

    Costs me $40 to refill, they get half price swap and go sodastream refills and are happy! and I get them free after a few swaps with friends and am happy!

    • I tip my OzB hat to you.

    • Just watched the kegland video for refilling. Do you put the Sodastream cylinder in the freezer before refilling? And if so, how long?

      Is there an easy way to tell when the Sodastream cylinder is full? And an easy way to tell when the bulk cylinder is nearly empty?

      • I put the sodastream bottles in the freezer for about a day or 2 before filling. Tighten the adapter onto the large co2 bottle using spanner (make sure to remove the rpv off the bottle first). Then hand tighten the sodastream bottle onto the the adapter, flip the large co2 bottle upside down and just slowly open up the valve. You should start hearing a hiss, if not then close the valve again, and slightly loosen the sodastream bottle and try again. It's a fine balance.

        You will know when the sodastream bottle is full when it stops hissing, i.e. The pressure between the 2 vessels has equalised. Takes about 1 minute or so.
        As for the checking the bulk cylinder, probably the best way is to weigh it when you get it, and when it drops 6kg, that would indicate that it's pretty empty. A regulator with a pressure gauge doesn't give a very good indication.

        • Yep pressure gauge only gives out meaningful readings after all the CO2 inside becomes gas, i.e. it is almost empty.

      • This is another good video. I find the Kegland one is a bit all over the place and didn't mention anything about taking the Sodastream off. If you watch both these videos it's hard to go wrong.

        https://youtu.be/BeZmesxhk8Y

  • Are the standard soda stream cylinders easy enough to fill with the $15 adaptor? Kegland sell a sodastream compatible cylinder to use instead of the standard soda stream one for $22 which according to them 'are also much easier to fill than the Sodastream branded cylinders'.

    • The Kegland ones are simple the latest generation Sodasream ones are not so simple. Kegland do an awesome video explaining how to fill.
      https://www.kegland.com.au/sodastream-cylinder-filling-adapt...
      If you go to around 5:20 it explains the issues with the Sodastream bottles perfectly. I bought 2 x Kegland 400ml bottles and they are a piece of cake to fill compared to the sodastream ones. Hope that helps!

    • The old soda stream cylinders are easy. They can be identified by a skinny pin. You can just open the tap and fill.

      The current ones with the wider flat valve are more tricky. Need to refill slowly as the pin shuts off the flow if it goes the whole way down. Takes some practice and patience.

  • Is this size 2.6kg suitable for fish tank ?

    • Plenty, I use the 2.6kg on my 4ft/220L tank and it keeps it going for around 2 and a half months. $10/kg refills and I'm good to go again.

    • Yes lots of people use the smaller ones so they can put it in underneath the tank the the stand. I have the 2.6kg and 6kg for my 2 tanks. The 6kg is behind a floor standing speaker but it is an eye sore if you can't hide it away.

  • So how many times can I kill myself with this?

  • I am more interested in buying dry ice and refilling that way.. but I can't find anyone to deliver dry ice?

  • After the first half a dozen refills from large cylinder I’m only able to partially fill it maybe 100 grams at most
    Using new generation sodastream and also freezing empties

    Anyone have this problem?

  • I went down the 6kg direct-connect to the Sodastream earlier in the year. The available hose lengths in the kits (36" & 72") weren't long enough for my config so I needed a custom hose made. Wow, what a drama! As soon as I mentioned 'gas' to most hose & fitting suppliers/manufacturers they just clammed up and didn't want to help at all… even after stressing over & over that it was 'just CO2'. Anyway, went to Pirtek, made it extremely clear that it was to be used for CO2 and paid an absolute fortune for a custom hose to be built on-the-spot. Took it home, hooked it all up and it worked perfectly… until about 4 hours later when we were hit with two massive explosions. Neighbours all around heard the bangs and we ended up with ringing ears. Turned out the 'professionals' at Pirtek had used hose designed for hydraulics, not for gases even though I had even raised this with them as I know a bit about stuff but just needed confirmation. The hoses were rated for the same high pressures but the CO2 had slowly leaked through the internal braid and had filled the outer jacket in two places creating a high pressure air bubble until they burst.

    Anyway, obviously not good enough and Pirtek eventually came to the party months later by making a new CO2 rated hose so all is now OK but yeah if there are any OzBargainers keen for a custom length CO2 hose please be 100% sure it's fit for purpose before connecting & charging up. I asked and asked but still can't get anyone to tell me what specific hose type is needed for CO2 and the markings on the hoses themselves don't seem to indicate it either. Sounds like voodoo to me… but I expected a heck of a lot more from Pirtek!

    • Damn, I missed the Edit window… but here's a pic of the original custom Pirtek hose showing the two bursts. During the post-mortem I proved the SodaStream and the hose itself still worked fine and continued to hold operating pressure and as you can see from the pic the internal braid wasn't damaged at all so it's purely down to the sneaky way CO2 can slowly seep through certain rubbers/materials. I'm no gas professional so it baffled me but I was a little surprised at how it also baffled to so-called pros too. Interesting… especially as the 72" Kegland hose kit worked flawlessly and was a fraction of the price. Just a shame it wasn't long enough :(

      • Here's a fun fact.

        In the Hadron Super Collider they need to pull such a low vacuum in their cooling loops that if they were to use copper pipe it would actually suck in air through the pipe wall like it was a sieve. Instead they use stainless steel pipe which has a much denser structure.

        This actually is a similar problem for rubber pipe, and is the reason why although it was rated for the pressure of co2 it wasn't rated for the size of the molecules.

    • Why not just use beer lines? Kegland gas line and quick connects are really easy to use and brewers use these for years…

      • That's exactly what I wanted to use however I looked around and couldn't find any fittings/adaptors to get from a cylinder valve/reg through to the Sodastream adaptor. As per most other things in life I assumed it would just be a very common thing and maybe it is however when I started my research I quickly discovered there's no such thing as a 'standard' when it comes to full-line work-arounds. Maybe you have a complete list of parts and links you could share with us all? I (& I'm sure hundreds of others who don't work with beer lines) would really appreciate it. Maybe make up a list and provide links for each & every part? That would be amazing!

        This was actually one of the first things I researched as I assumed it would be really easy however speaking to staff at home brewing shops and a few people involved in bar fitouts everyone just said 'nah' straight away… but over the last 10 years I'm learning this is a normal response for many now. Sad really… so super expensive trial & error via the 'professionals' was my only choice. It's working perfectly now however I'd love to change it over to beer type lines as this HP hose is very thick & rigid in comparison.

      • Hi Pensionday. Could you write up a parts list of what's required to allow me to use the beer line solution please? I'd love to know how to do it and I'm sure there are many others out there who'd appreciate it too. Cheers!

  • I have been thinking of getting a sodastream. What are peoples recommendations around these? Buy a second hand one? New? Designs?

    • Get a brand new one. Currently only about $70 on sale at BigW or around $100 normally or start researching the alternatives including an adaptor to allow you to simply use a softdrink bottle connected to a standard CO2 cylinder. No SodaStream required… if that's what you want.