What Age Did You Move out?

I'm 39 this year, I moved out at 21….got me own place in the same suburb as me folks. Strange too given I'm of Asian background, it was quite rare back in the day to move out on your own. I think I've come across maybe 2 other Asians around my age who've done the whole moving out rite of passage thing around my age.

It was a bit of a run down house cosmetically - the bathroom and kitchen had a lot of wear and tear but the 3 bedder BV was in decent shape structurally and on 700m2. I lived in it for one year before I moved interstate twice and then the UK for the working visa and then Asia for a 1 year travel stint. Best time of my life now when I reflect it after having 2 kids.

Is it just me or do people move out way later than what it used to be like? If I had to put an average down (disregarding ethnic backgrounds) seems to be now hovering at mid 20s ish mark.

Yes, property and rent is so expensive these days and also I've noticed at least with my younger cousins..having the ability to bring home partners is not really an issue. At the end of the day though, there is just something that sort of can't buy independence? I almost compare it to training wheels = living with folks. You are not really truly independent unless those training wheels come off.

Comments

  • +3 votes

    Purely anecdotal and from a western perspective but I think there are actually less kids spending their 20s living with their parents than what I saw in the 90s and 00s. I think because social media makes it so much easier to find a sharehouse and it also has increased pressure on people to maintain a higher standard of living - it's not so cool posting your tiktoks from the family living room.

    The sort of people I'm exposed to most though are living at home because they're losers, not because they're trying to build wealth. Probably there's been an increase in the latter.

    I was out at 21.

    • +5 votes

      Just want to come back to this and add that while I don't look down on staying at home to save for a deposit, I think that the skills you gain from navigating housemates and all their various personality types are invaluable and will go a long way in helping you be more successful in your career and personal relationships.

  • +8 votes

    We've done this before https://www.ozbargain.com.au/node/212963

    We need more original topics.

    22, I'm almost 39 now.

    •  

      i'd like to move out if i could

    • +17 votes

      We need more original topics.

      How old were you when you made your first mob hit, and how did you dispose of the body?

      • +2 votes

        17, hydrofluoric acid.

  • +19 votes

    Early 30s, still at home technically. They own it but live elsewhere.

    I feel I missed the boat a little bit due to the doubling (?) of property prices in the late 00s which I think greatly impacts on those age to move out numbers.

  • +2 votes

    26, I was born in an Asian country and moving out with a mate was very uncommon.

  • +10 votes

    Moved out when 18.
    Best move I ever did…Nothing wrong with home, just wanted out.

    •  

      absolutely. I get the financial benefits if you are living in the same city but I feel moving out at 18 caused a lot of growth that I needed.
      I remember just as school was starting to end I started getting the pangs of 'this is pretty nice here, I'm going to be sad to leave'. Had to supress that real quick and gtfo or I doubt I ever would've taken any risks.

  • +4 votes

    17yo - just after I got my driver's licence. The first house I moved into was sharing with my sister and another person. At 18 I moved into a sharehouse with friends from university.

    • +6 votes

      I would have literally pis*ed in my nappies moving out at that age. I was too busy getting distraught over year 12 exams at 17.

      Having said that I knew of a bloke who moved out in yr.11 (so I think 16?) He had a casual job at the local woolies…safeway back then. I was both in awe at how much freedom he had yet was totally like damn you've got to carry a lot on your shoulders.

      Then again depending on the maturity level I don't think its too wise to move out prior to 20 if you can't really handle too much freedom.

      • +1 vote

        I wasn't exactly mature, but enough that I could hold down a casual job, pay my rent, buy my groceries, do my laundry, etc. It's not like I never saw my parents again, they lived an hour away - so I'd go and see them lots of weekends.

  • +38 votes

    50 and still living at home

    • +15 votes

      This is the way.

      • +4 votes

        Mando is that you?

    • +6 votes

      L.T. Smash: [to Principal Skinner] Man, they're gonna be big… and you stood in their way!
      Principal Skinner: No I didn't. I even came in early and made orange drink!
      L.T. Smash: Orange drink? What, do you live with your mama?
      Principal Skinner: She lives with me.

    • +1 vote

      That's normal, a lot of people live at home. Home is where the heart is.

  • +10 votes

    Finished uni at 21, went backpacking, never came home

    • +5 votes

      Without a reference to your current age this could be anytime from yesterday to 40 or more years

  • +1 vote

    I'm 42, and was 19 when I moved out. Lived on my own, and loved it! I was the only one of my friends to move out - but they all had it pretty good at home, so stayed there until they were in their mid-late 20s. I had an aunt who lived at home until she was in her mid-30s, and know people who moved back home well into their 40s. I guess it depends on the circumstances.

    •  

      Moving back into their 40s…surely that would be to be looking after ageing parents in a somewhat role reversal? Suppose there is always a give and take. Some people are incredibly close to their folks like almost up to the point they are like maintain their folk's life. It really depends on what you favour really…independence vs closeness to parents.

      • +2 votes

        No, in both cases it was due to their marriage breaking down and having nowhere else to go. From what I've been told, the parents weren't happy about it (would only have been in their late 60s/early 70s, so didn't need looking after!) but I don't think it was a permanent situation.

      • +1 vote

        My uncle lives with my grandparents at the moment due to a complicated situation for him. Grandparents don't need looking after and they get on each others nerves massively. Feel a bit sorry for him but his situation is of his own making ultimately. He's nearly 60.

  • +1 vote

    Moved out at 18, but that was to go to on-campus accommodation at university where you have a little bedroom with a sink, desk and cupboard and get fed at a cafeteria and there's a TV room, games room, music room, IT lab, pub etc. Nice transition from being a kid to being an adult. You get looked after a little bit (in an institutional way) but have a lot more freedom than living at home. Moved out of that to a share house age 20.

  • +38 votes

    got me own place in the same suburb as me folks

    As in purchased?

    I'm 39 this year, I moved out at 21

    Purchased in 2003?

    Yes, property and rent is so expensive these days

    This and only this.

    Jun 2003 Median Detached House Price: $287,500
    Average Wage 2003: $53,424.80
    5.38x average wage

    Now:
    December 2020 Median Detached House Price: $936,000
    Average Wage 2020: A$89,122
    10.5x average wage

    Try borrowing $936k as a 21 year old moving out of home today…

    • +12 votes

      Yes, much easier to purchase a property back then.

      • -17 votes

        What was the interest back in 2003?

        Borrowing $287k @ 8% interest for 30 years = $2,106 per month (47% of average wage)
        Borrowing $936k @ 2.5% interest for 30 years = $3,698 per month (49% of average wage)

        Looks like equilibrium to me. Mortgage was as expensive in 2003 as it was in 2020.

        • +45 votes

          Not really. Just because you can afford the repayments, doesn't mean you're able to purchase a property.

          Much easier to save $57k for a 20% deposit back then than it is to save $187k for 20% today.

          I purchased a property back in 2000 and the 20% deposit was much more achievable than it is today. Stamp duty was fully paid by the first homeowners grant.

          In 2003 a WRX STI cost $56k. A WRX STI was all you needed for a 20% deposit…..

          When young people today say it's harder than it is today, it's a very valid argument.

          • -22 votes

            @JimB:

            Much easier to save $57k for a 20% deposit back then than it is to save $187k for 20% today.

            I agree. That's why you should not be aiming to save up 20% deposit. Aim to save 10% deposit. $57k in today's money is $93k which is those 10%.

            The reason is that interest rates are so low, you should buy as soon as bank will lend you. For many people that's even at 5% mark which means you can buy sooner in 2020 than you could back in 2003.

            The argument that it's harder today than 20 years ago is just not true. It's easier. Higher proportion of first home buyers are buying today than 20 years ago.

            • +7 votes

              @lubos: It may be easier to buy a cheap home in the outer suburbs today, but harder to buy a median priced home today…

              Are rates going to stay at 2.5% forever? Do you think the buy borrowing a shit more today that repayments will be easier 5-10 years down the track when rates hits 7.5%?

              Even if it's 2.5% interest, you're paying a shit more principal today

              I purchased my first home 20 years ago and also purchased another home recently. Let me tell you, in real dollars, it's much cheaper back then for the same properties.

          •  

            @JimB: The only catch back then was lending requirements, stricter than today or at least during the mid 2010s whereby you could literally borrow hundreds of thousands on a $60k income.

            Like anything in economics, supply and demand. Population growth coupled with increasing scarcity of land = prices propped up.

            This leads to pretty much two conclusions, earn more to buy or simply compromise on say land size or building type.

            • +1 vote

              @willister: Yes stricter but because of that you didn't need to borrow as much to buy a reasonable home.

              And 10 years down the track the repayments are laughably small so it's easier to pay them off.

              • -12 votes

                @JimB: Hindsight is 20/20. You had no idea 20 years ago that interest rates will go so low. They could as well go higher, property prices could have gone lower and you would end up holding the bag.

                Yes - those who have bought 20 years ago like yourself ended up doing very well. But nobody knew 20 years ago what the future will hold. Just like now, nobody knows what 2030 and 2040 will look like.

                Perhaps people buying today will do even better than you. Perhaps 5 years from now we will have hyper-inflation and you will be able to pay off your multi-million dollar mortgage with 2 bags of potatoes. So who says what people are borrowing today is not reasonable? Perhaps it will turn out very reasonable. We don't know.

                • +7 votes

                  @lubos: I never said what people are borrowing today is unreasonable, all I said is it's harder to save deposit/repay principal than it was 17 years ago.

                  Stop talking shit and making irrelevant assumptions from my statements.

                  • -8 votes

                    @JimB:

                    all I said is it's harder to save deposit/repay principal than it was 17 years ago.

                    It's not true. You do not need 20% deposit to buy home. You can buy with 5% deposit which makes it easier today than 20 years ago even after considering inflated real-estate prices.

                    And whether it's going to be harder to repay principal…. how can you say that?

                    I'm sure back in 2003 when you bought your first home people were saying how expensive real-estate is and how much harder it will be for people to repay principal than it was for people who bought in 1980. And here we are.

                    Nobody can predict the future. You saying it will be harder to repay principal for people buying today is talking shit.

                    • -1 vote

                      @lubos: Actually, the future is easy to predict. It's the past that's relative thus something that can be argued over.

                      In the future there will be no such thing as real estate as we will all be homeless. Only homelessness is sustainable because it requires no supply of housing materials.. Plenty of other animals live quite happily without building a house, nest or burrow…

                      So many people ask what's the solution to the problem of homelessness when homelessness isn't the problem it's 'housing' that's the problem thus homelessness is actually the solution.

                      This obeys Universal Solution Law which I developed to solve all problems in the Universe:

                      Solution = ~ Problem

                      Homeless = ~Housing

            •  

              @willister:

              The only catch back then was lending requirements, stricter than today or at least during the mid 2010s whereby you could literally borrow hundreds of thousands on a $60k income.

              Today people are probably borrowing closer to a million than low hundreds of thousands and definitely not on a $60k income. Problem today is not interest that is going to kill you. Capital will. $1m loan at 2.5% over 30 years will mean $440k of interest while paying $1m of capital. Even if the bank gives you zero interest holiday, you'll still struggle to pay the principle.

              Like anything in economics, supply and demand. Population growth coupled with increasing scarcity of land = prices propped up.

              That is what quack economists want you to believe.

              Land scarcity is only in a few regions in Australia (Melbourne, Sydney and maybe Brisbane) and that is stretching it. Infrastructure is scarce, if you want to live next to a train line which the last significant build out was the 1960s - 70s yes land near train lines and facilities is scarce.

              Population growth: most migrants try to go to the capitals not regional areas. To believe that all migrants come to Australia will money ready to bid up property is stretching it a little. If I was a rich person with money it opens a lot of doors to migration programs in US, Canada, UK even some EU countries literally selling passports such as Portugal or Cyprus. Portugal is only 500k Euros investment to get a visa with path to citizenship which is way cheaper than an inner Melbourne unit / house.

        • +5 votes

          You could put 2k/month into a HISA back then and buy it outright in 8 years.

          Doing the equivalent now (3.7k/month) at 2.5% and it'll take you 16 years.

    • +3 votes

      Yep. Purchased. I saved up about $15K…..worked part time since 15. Folks chipped in with a zero interest loan for 3 years.

      Property was in an area that was ungentrified at the time and pretty run down so it was cheapish…..$230K at the time (for sale).

      No doubt times were diff.

      •  

        Good on you for saving since 15. Most of my mates would have used the cash to buy a new falcon or commodore.

        That said the world has changed.

        Note the values I used above are average wages. If you're working in a lower paid industry I feel you're now doomed to rent forever if you live in Sydney or Melbourne.

  • +2 votes

    Moved out at 17.

  • +24 votes

    32 🤞🤞🤞 this is the year.. i got a feeling about this year. I have a feeling about every year. But this one, this is the one.

    • +4 votes

      Oh boy, I feel you. 31 and I feel the same!

      We can do this.

      •  

        am 25 any tips

        • +1 vote

          Just dive in would be my advice. Nothing wrong with trying living in a share house. Meet new people, make some stories, have some experiences, and dance the dance of life!

          I was out at 20, and would’ve been a lot richer in money had I stayed home, but would’ve lived a much poorer life without the friends and growth that came with moving out and taking some risks.

          Best of luck!

  • +27 votes

    31, nearly out.

    If anyone wants to unload one of there 8 investment properties they own at a reasonable price, let me know. (Please don't report this as selling, it's a joke)

  • +1 vote

    Eh different times, different rite of passage.

    I lived alone as soon as I graduated high school, but as an international student back then, I had no financial independence (long story short, visa requirement means full time load and can't work full time). So 18?

    Since I don't think I was independent back then, I don't think moving out is be all answer to "independence".

    Anyways, I think it's much sensible to stay with your parents as much as you can nowadays. It just makes little sense to spend money on rent, when you could be spending that money on something meaningful to you.

    • +4 votes

      It just makes little sense to spend money on rent, when you could be spending that money on something meaningful to you.

      That's right, this is OzBargain after all :)

      • +4 votes

        So eneloops and power banks?

        • +3 votes

          victorinox knife is the new trend now.

          Or just saving up for larger $ purchases.

  • +9 votes

    There are heaps of cultures where it's normal for children to stay at home until you get married. Mine is one of them. That said, I think there are a lot of adults moving out of home when they have purchased a house. I think parents from such cultures place high emphasis on stability in terms of marriage and/or buying a house so they are happy to insist their kids live at home until they get married and/or save enough money to buy a house.

  • +12 votes

    With the state of the real estate market i don't blame people for prolonging it.
    I'm in my late 20's and staying at home to save a deposit is probably the best financial decision i've made. I don't feel i've missed out on being independent, i do my washing, cooking, chores etc and pay the utilities.

    Doing this has saved me some $10k a year for the last 8 years which really adds up, now have a 30% deposit ready to go.

    Unfortunately with the market in the position it is this is going to be more common, even with stupid ideas such as newstart with a 5% deposit getting you a home (really shouldn't be buying a home with a 5% deposit).

    It's not really their fault for staying at home, if i had a choice i would move out but unfortunately i didn't have the luxury of moving into a market that was affordable.

    •  

      💯💯💯💯

    •  

      really shouldn't be buying a home with a 5% deposit

      Paying rent vs. buying a house with a 5% deposit is a pretty easy decision in my opinion.

      At least that extra interest you pay is benefitting you in some way.

      • +1 vote

        It's not so much about the penalty of increased interest rates and LMI, moreso if the Australian housing market does go backwards (hits a wall) then the 5% equity will quickly disappear.

        If the homeowner then wants to refinance/move out/lose their job then they'll owe more than their property's worth. a 95% loan to value ratio will add some 5 years of interest to pay off to a loan.

        If you want to be a slave to your mortgage then this is the best way of doing it.

        •  

          Slave to mortgage or slave to rent?

          I enjoy owning my own house too much to consider renting to be enjoyable.

    •  

      Doing this has saved me some $10k a year for the last 8 years which really adds up, now have a 30% deposit ready to go.

      Buy, pretend to live there and rent it out. Keep smashing that mortgage.

      •  

        Honestly am thinking of doing that, just the fact that 75% of all investment properties are negatively geared is a bit of a worry.

        • +1 vote

          just the fact that 75% of all investment properties are negatively geared is a bit of a worry.

          The 25% not negatively geared is after years of ownership or you live in a regional area where you can purchase a $200k property and rent it out for $200pw.

          What is more worrying is 75% of people are willing to pay out on a monthly basis for a mythical pot of gold 5 years+ down the track.

          Difference between ploughing $2k a month into share market vs repayments on investment property is if you lose your job at least with the share market you can stop and take a breath.

  • +7 votes

    Im 38 and still live at home. Going to live at home as long as i can too expensive to move out.

    • +1 vote

      You live in Adelaide. Houses are far cheaper compared to the eastern states

  • +4 votes

    Moved out of home with gf (now wife) in 2015 @24y/o. Rented for 2 years and saved up every penny during that time. Bought 1st house together in 2017. Married same year. Now I've just graduated from Uni. We feel immensely proud of ourselves because we received no parental support achieving all these milestones and I shudder thinking back to those 2 years of renting.

  • +3 votes

    I was 15. Tried living with father again at 16 but too many clashes. Moved out for good at 16 and have lived alone since

  • +2 votes

    37 now… Moved out at 23. Half my friends had moved out by then but plenty stayed at home until they got married. I moved as soon as I got my first full time job and would not have stayed longer because my parents were really strict and there was no way I could bring anyone home. Maybe I could have stayed longer if they were more relaxed/'Western'/less religious.
    Only wound up buying a property at 35 but no regrets. Did the UK working holiday, now having a kid.. The timing was right for me despite my parents constantly bugging me to buy property for 10 years.

  •  

    2 months after finishing school

  • +2 votes

    Moved out shortly after turning 18. It was second semester of my first year of uni.

    Sharehouse with 5 people in the inner west of Sydney. Stayed over 10 years. Probably lived with 30-40 different people. Probably the best times of my life. sheds single tear

    • +2 votes

      This is pretty typical of Newtown/Camperdown life back in the day..

      • +2 votes

        Nailed it. The house was in Newtown.

  •  

    18, to go to Uni in a different city. Not on campus - rented rooms, then share houses. Learned a lot about myself, and others. Bought first house five years later. That was life!

  •  

    Moved out at 17, fresh out of high school. I couldn’t stand Sydney and needed to be anywhere but there. 20 years on, I still can’t stand Sydney. Oh, I had an effnik family too. It’s not really that hard to do, but you’ve gotta be willing to get out of the big cities, so much life is beyond the coastline.

    My only regret is that I didn’t settle in FNQ or the NT.

  • +40 votes

    I never usually comment as I have seen how merciless and nasty some replies are just letting those know who undoubtedly count how many posts I have made previously LOL.

    I moved out when I was 15. I am over 60 now and was orphaned at 14. Once you could earn money back then you were on your own basically. Between 14 and 15 I was moved between relatives that had no interest in a long term arrangement. When I found a job I was packed up and taken to the nearest hostel and told I was grown up now. It was not easy but coming from a less than ideal upbringing I basically could look after myself anyway. I learnt early how to problem solve and how to read people. Being female this was done with even more trepidation. I am not sure times were any different in the early '70's than what they are now. You were always alert and onguard and you didn't trust anyone until they earned it. I have lived in hostels and share houses in the early days. Hostels were a real eye opener as is the way now as it was back then they were often frequented by people down on their luck.

    Observation was my key to survival. I saw and took note of everything around me learning from other people's mistakes. Back then I was probably voted the girl least likely to succeed. I proved them all wrong. I married at 23, still married to the same man. We have two kids who have done well in their life and even though I never made great advancements to mankind I have had a good and productive life. I do remember however when my own kids were 15 I looked at them and thought no way would either of them survived on their own.

    My kids are quite independent. Son moved out as soon as he finished his apprenticeship and my daughter was around 20 also although the door is always open to them they both "own" their own homes so I can't see that happening.

    • +8 votes

      glad to see someone in 60's still sharing their thoughts in OzB.

    •  

      Kudos to you lilbudgie!

  • +12 votes

    Moved out at 24. I’m 34 this year. Sometimes feel like moving back home to live with my parents who are early 70s. Seems like mum might have early onset dementia :’(

    • +3 votes

      That's sad. I hope you can find a balance with independence and caring.

      • +12 votes

        When dad tells me when mum popped down to the supermarket to get bread and milk and didn’t come home for 4 hours because she couldn’t remember where she parked the car at Westfields I want to cry.

        •  

          someone should go with her, your dad possibly ?

          •  

            @capslock janitor: I think that’s what happens most often now. My younger brother left the UK and went home 2 weeks before the hard lockdown. Got given notice and lost his job once arriving at Heathrow airport but in hindsight he’s at home and can help dad look out for mum too.

    • +8 votes

      I'm sorry to hear that Jay. My opinion only but spend as much time with her as she is now before it gets worse.
      All the best.

  •  

    Moved to France at 21 for a year of student exchange in 2020. Now I'm back at home for my final year of uni and I'm planning a move to Canberra for 2022 to pursue a APS role, hopefully in DFAT.

  •  

    Moved out at 17. Looking back it seems pretty crazy and I really struggled initially, but I'm so glad I did.

    • +1 vote

      In what ways did you struggle?

  •  

    15 years old. Went to another city for a better quality high school, this was not in Australia.

  •  

    at 15 moved to a relative's place, then at 17 to another relative, then bought own place at 24

  •  

    30 and live with aunty, uncle, grandpa, :shame:

    •  

      Are you contemplating moving out?

      •  

        live with them save me tons of money, so …..

        • +1 vote

          I'm not judging, merely curious. If it works for you and your family, power to you. It's rare to find that sort of "community" in Australia whilst it is till common in certain Asian, African, East European and Latin American cultures.
          Historically, from a humanistic standpoint, even going back 100 years, we have always lived with or near our parents and familial structures. Many villages were formed from family units with uncles, aunts, grandparents etc either living together or having houses next to each other… this is actually how some villages grew - as, after a few generations, the distant offspring would get married to each other.

  •  

    18 when i moved interstate for uni.

  •  

    23 when i got married

  •  

    17 When I moved to Germany, for an exchange year. Found (Go figure) an Australian girl there. Shacked up with her parents until we bought at 24. Still with her, 28 now.

  •  

    Moved out at 18 to uni acco but was dependant on parents for $$ till 21. Nearing 40 but have been financially independant since 21, however have moved back with parents couple of times early 20s. Wish parents were in a big city and dint have to struggle but honestly all this experience has made me strong ( mentally and physically )

  •  

    My older sister and I started renting together at 15. And I moved between a few houses prior to that. Then purchased my first house at 20.

    •  

      How'd you do it at 20? wtf

      •  

        Probably a smaller home in a rural area

        •  

          I live in Adelaide. First house was $305,000 in a half decent area and was working full time earning just above the median wage at the time.

          If you can get a full time normal job here in Adelaide, save a small deposit and pay LMI. You can get a better house with cheaper repayments then an equivilent rental.

          • +2 votes

            @Commander Shepard: Lord this is so true.

            I pay a lot more than my minimum repayments on my mortgage (not bragging, we are DINKs and have no excuse not to). When our statement came in the other week with the minimum repayments I almost fell over. I would put this place on the rental market for 40 - 50% more than the minimum repayments.

            Of course not everyone is in a position to save the deposit. We were fortunate, we were able to save, had parents who chipped in a few thousand and the banks had special deals available for our professions which helped us get in earlier than we otherwise would have.

  •  

    Moved out at 21. 37 now. Bought a house with my gf last year.