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Makita LXT 18V 4.0Ah Lithium-Ion Battery With Gauge $91.35 (RRP $129) C&C /+ Delivery @ Bunnings

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These expensive and rarely discounted Makita 18V Lithium-ion batteries everywhere, Bunnings is currently selling the 4.0Ah model at a discounted price.

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  • +2 votes

    The sale price runs till wed 22nd just rang bunnings

    •  

      22 April 2021 is not a Wednesday

      • -1 vote

        Wed night at 9pm 22 is wen back to $129

  • +2 votes

    4ah is old tech, get some 6ah up ya

    • +1 vote

      If you're not tradies 4ah is more than enough.

    •  

      Agreed. I have 3,4,5,6, and I hate the 3 and find the 4 frustratingly short too.
      If you're only using a drill/driver then 3/4 is ok, but angle grinder , recipro, etc then 5 is the minimum.

  •  

    Is it worth investing in Makita in the long run for DIY odd jobs around the house (family with 2 kdis if that matters)?

    Whats the best bang for your bucks between makita vs ryobi vs ozito 18V?

    I want medium quality but don't want to pay 50% more or double for 10-20% gain in performance/longevity

    I currently have a 18V Ryobi hedge trimmer & a line trimmer, worx hammer drill. thinking of investing in a leaf blower and impact driver. And potentially a circular saw

    •  

      Just go for ozito, ryobi is better but much more expensive, and still DIY quality. Makita is trade quality, it’s good if you use it everyday to make money.

    • +9 votes

      If you can afford it then absolutely. I'm only a home user who likes to tinker but have accumulated about a dozen Makita tools over the years and they have all been faultless.

      I have the leaf blower, impact driver and circular saw and the quality of the tools is excellent.

      • +2 votes

        Yep likewise - I'm just a home user, but have accumulated quite a collection of tools, thanks to the occasional stupidly-cheap sale or finding something cheap secondhand. Bonus battery by redemption deals have also helped. I've got drills, impact drivers, blowers, lawn mower, hedge trimmer, sander, jigsaw, circular saw and a few others. I've also got a lifetime supply of old 18650 battery cells from old laptops, which I've been making my own battery packs for (as you can buy the case / circuit boards from China for cheap). Cannot fault any of my Makita tools.

        • +1 vote

          You don't want to use a 18650 cell from a laptop to rebuild a power tool battery as most power tools (such as Makita 18V LXT) draw higher currents and require high drain cells. High drain cells, unlike the ones used in laptops, can provide 15A or even higher.

        •  

          Do you have a link where you source the case / circuit boards for Makita?

    • +4 votes

      Not sure which Makita tools you can use on the family, maybe the Makita Multitool for cutting open a broken bone cast.

      Makita Aus is super greedy, so you can buy the US models on ebay for 20-50% less. Same product just a different product code sticker.
      Sometimes on Amazon also, usually shipped from UK.

      If buying from Makita Aus, I don't think they're worth the premium, however imports can be worth it.
      Also they're some fairly decent chinese Makita knock offs, with real brushless motors which cost less than the Ozito equivalent and can be superior.

      All my battery tools are Makita, and the corded ones are 40/60 Ozito/Ryobi.

      With Ozito you can fashion your own LiPo battery as they just have +/-, with Makita it's a bit trickier as they have safety circuits.

      •  

        You can buy battery cases for Makita tools, with the protection circuit boards included, for bugger all on AliExpress etc. I've made a couple of battery packs which work well - and have a few more on my list of things to do. I bought a Chinese knock-off Makita jigsaw for about $80 from memory - might have been a lot cheaper - and was very surprised at how well built it is and how well it works. Completely compatible with my existing batteries too which helped :).

        I imported my lawn mower from the UK on eBay - the cost of the mower + $100 shipping was still hundreds cheaper than buying the equivalent model over here.

        •  

          I know, but I was refering to just using a straight LiPo + XT60, instead of an 18650 case. The ali/banggood makita brushless angle grinder is pretty good too.

    •  

      I'd say Ryobi. Ozito stuff is cheaper but it also inferior compared to Ryobi. Check out Gumtree for plenty of second hand deals on Ryobi stuff.

      Edit. Fyi I am a Ryobi user and have like 15-20 different skins. Some tools perform better than other for the price.
      If you are after just a basic drill and impact and that's all I'd go Ozito if you are seeking a start to an ecosystem with infant options and just as good warranty I'd go Ryobi.

    • +1 vote

      I went though the same process recently when looking at a cordless chainsaw. Yes they are expensive if that's a consideration, but they're also considered one of the better ones, this translates into healthy second hand market also. They're also one of the last companies who their core business is tools, they're not owned by a conglomerate or answer to a parent company meaning cost isn't the only driver. Project Farm pegs them usually in the top 3 of whatever he's testing, so it isnt simply a story of what's cheaper, but they are the better choice in addition to being long lasting.

    • +2 votes

      Buy the Ryobi skins / tools off gumtree.
      Buy the batteries new.

    • +3 votes

      If you're thinking of dropping the coin on Makita be aware that they released a new battery platform last year. The new platform is '40V' and is not compatible with the old 18V batteries.
      Makita say they will be continuing to support their 18V platform, but who knows what the situation will be in a few years.

      • +4 votes

        I'm a DIY and woodworking hobbyist guy and I agree with a lot of what you say. However, I don't agree with you that corded is 'way less hassle' than cordless. Gimme cordless any day, unless it's big stuff like drop saws and table saws where the portability won't be of any benefit to me.

        You definitely do pay a premium for good cordless tools and having to replace expensive batteries every few years is an issue, I agree, but literally not being tied down and restricted by a cord is brilliant.

      • +3 votes

        Rubbish. I've got Ryobi lithium batteries from 8years and they are still going strong. For DIY use, given the batteries are stored somewhere out of extreme temperatures the cells should last for ages. Obviously not 30-40 years but for a DIYer that needs a tool for light work the batteries don't get hammered on a daily basis

        • +1 vote

          I have a pair of heavily used Ryobi batteries from 2012 which mostly gave up the ghost in 2020 — eight years of use. No complaints there!

          •  

            @wintrmute: That's a decent run, the other commercial stuff would get the same if your lucky

  • +3 votes

    A little off topic, but hoping for some advice. Can anyone please comment on the quality of the Ryobi One+ 18v 5000mAh rip-offs available on Amazon for around $40? Any personal experience with these would be awesome. Thanks in advance.

    •  

      This is not ryobi.

    • -2 votes

      Stick to genuine tools batteries and chargers roe your safety.

      • -2 votes

        This is genuine, roe your info.

        • +2 votes

          What do you mean by "this"? The OP is replying to a comment not related to the deal:

          Can anyone please comment on the quality of the Ryobi One+ 18v 5000mAh rip-offs […]

    • +2 votes

      Have one. It's got about the same capacity as my 4000mah genuine. But still a bargain and running well 2 years later.

      • +1 vote

        Can also buy ozito to Ryobi adapters for less than 20 bucks that might make sense for you too

    • +9 votes

      Yeah I've been using the Amazon ones that say "Lithium Ion" where the original Ryobi ones say "one +".

      I also have the equivalent fake 36v ones.
      All used alongside originals.

      Figured I'd save some money considering my Ryobi collection lol:

      Ryobi items include Drill driver, impact driver, hammer drill (hi torque version), multi tool, soldering kit, hobby Dremel kit, circular saw, recip.saw, blower, mower (36v), line trimmer (36v)

      The power output is similar to the originals but:

      • on some of them one of the middle bar battery led's have stopped working so it's always '3 bars full' when charged up. I believe this is a common issue

      • on some of them, depends on the brand of fake I guess, the led's don't blink when charging unlike the originals

      • while the 'output' is similar, the cells may be slightly inferior as they don't last as long but that's hardly an issue if you're using it on a conventional drill/driver/soldering station, most circular saw applications etc. More if it's a high+constant torque application.

      • this is only an issue on the 36v's, the fakes (2 years in) have started to overheat and cutout when used in the mower vs. the originals, but both still run just fine on the line trimmer.

      Overall, I'd happily buy the fakes again but from Amazon rather than eBay. I find Amazon warranty and support is good enough even 12-18 months in that I'd happily trust that I'll be looked after if anything went wrong.

      Sorry if I went into too much detail! Hope this helps.

      •  

        Awesome summation. Thanks so much :)

      • +1 vote

        Thank you for going into detail!

        Are you worried that the knock off batteries could damage your tools?

        How much are you saving when you buy the knock off batteries, 30% or more?

        •  

          There’s a warning I got about the knock offs batteries on eBay and they have been known to over heat and explode yet eBay allow them to be sold

    • +5 votes

      You are associated with another store selling the same product. Take your comments to your own post. You have been here 9 years, you know better than this.

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  •  

    I think that i paid for my 5ah around $88

    •  

      Where from? Bunnings?

      •  

        I've picked from gumtree or Facebook Marketplace for about that all the time. People buy kits then sell off batteries.

      •  

        This was a tool shop on ebay.

  • +9 votes

    Did Mac ever give old mate his Makita back?

  •  

    Ooofff that's one expensive 4ah battery even on sale

    • +2 votes

      Tell me about it. Most of these 18V Li-on batteries are expensive, especially Makita brand. Guess that's how the manufacturers get money from us, by selling all their expensive accessories. I've been looking out of discount for the past one year and don't recall ever seeing one Makita battery deal posted.

      •  

        Just use battery adapter, or replace your own battery cells. The cheapest option for me so far is look for clearance battery from Aldi, 30-50% off.around $20-30 for a 4ah battery.

    • +2 votes

      Yes, buying a combo kit is almost always cheaper, especially after you sell the ones you already own or don't need.

      You can easily sell the drill and the driver for ~$150 each (RRP ~$190 skin only) and get 2x4.0Ah batteries plus the charger for ~$100:

      https://www.bunnings.com.au/makita-18v-2-piece-cordless-brus...

      •  

        I only buy Makita when on sale, 2 months ago I order my multi tools head DUX60 kit with hedge trimmer, with bonus line trimer and redemption blower, stacked with Sydney tools bonus store credit, end up paying around $1000 for the kit ($879)and 2 more tools($129 item to made up $1000 transection to get $200 credit, then use it for another tool).

      •  

        That's how I have my collection of tools as well (I use Bosch Blue mostly). Wait for a good kit deal at Bunnings, flog the individual items and keep the batteries / kit I actually need.

        It takes a little while to achieve, but I did a few rounds and have a bunch of 18v 6Ah batteries for the Bosch Blue and basically all the tools I need at net zero cost.

      •  

        For $300 you can get 2 brushless drills, a charger and a 5.0Ah battery:
        https://www.bunnings.com.au/makita-18v-2-piece-brushless-cor...

        For $350 you can get 2 brushless black drills, a charger and a 6.0Ah battery:
        https://www.bunnings.com.au/makita-18v-2-piece-brushless-com...

        •  

          What’s the advantage of black ?

          •  

            @abhayks: It's just the colour. The hammer drill in the black kit (DHP484) is slightly better than the other (DHP485) though.

            •  

              @bio: The black is a ltd model just like the black n while drill kits that came out for Father’s Day last year

  •  

    I've pulled apart a fair few different brand of tool batteries for the 18650 cells inside and I've found the Makita' to be the most well build pack.

    •  

      Did you record your "unboxing" of those batteries and post them on YouTube? It will be good to see the components inside them.

  •  

    would 2 of these power their Lawn Mower?
    https://www.bunnings.com.au/makita-380mm-18vx2-lawn-mower-sk...

    $600 aint too bad

  • +2 votes

    The original makita packs I have pulled apart use Sanyo cells not some Chinese crap like found in cheaper tools.

  •  

    Anyone tried the XGT line yet… thoughts?

    • +1 vote

      I've got the hammer drill, impact driver and circular saw. All have been great and the battery life has been outstanding. The drill is probably the biggest improvement over past models though. It's a beast and you can actually do masonry and concrete drilling with it — to a point — unlike my old 18v model it has replaced. It's not going to replace a rotary hammer drill by any means though.
      The driving settings are excellent too and it can hold its own against an impact driver for that purpose.
      My main gripe is that the 4Ah are pretty big and chunky on the drill and driver and you have to pony up quite a bit to get the smaller 2.5Ah batteries — which are excellent and still have killer run time for those tools though.

  •  

    Best power tool I bought is the Aeg 58v chainsaw and the aeg 58 v brush cutter. Brush cutter particularly is very powerful. These make sense as power tools since you can't really take a corded in the bush. I've got a stihl chainsaw I never use since the Aeg is all I need. Never mow anymore just use the brushcutter.I didn't pay bunnings $600 though. Got the chainsaw for $300 from cashconverters with battery and charger. Sell the charger for $80… Pretty reasonable. Batteries come up on gumtree now and again for $100 or so. Don't go near bunnings… Stupid prices.

  •  

    pretty good for anyone specifically keen for a battery. They don't seem to shift price very often.
    As you'll see elsewhere, the bundles are where they give any savings (conditional on you actually needing all of it).

    I couldn't track down online a bundle that's on the Makita website, but then when I called up a local TotalTools they did have it, and the price was good compared to what I was looking at.