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Canon EOS RP Full Frame Mirrorless Camera with RF 24-105mm IS STM Lens $1698 + Delivery ($0 C&C) @ Harvey Norman

470

Cheapest I’ve seen for a while for the Kit. Start of the EOY discounts I guess.

ETA. I bought this yesterday from HN. I tried to price match with JB which worked fine BUT they would only take one payment method and I wanted to pay part gift card and part credit card. I’m in Melbourne (lockdown) so JB says it’s an online purchase and wouldnt take a split payment. I know HN isn’t the best, but it was super easy to buy click and collect using multiple payment methods and 1 hour later I had it in my hands 🙌
I am upgrading from a 12+ year old Rebel XSi so it’s a steep learning curve for me now 😆

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  •  

    Amazing how photographers state their own preferences as if they were fact. Not just photographers, but photographers are definitely good at doing that.

    Full frame vs compact.
    'Blah blah blah. I like compact therefore here are all the advantages of compact and few or none of the disadvantages, opposite for full frame".
    'Blah blah blah. I like full frame therefore here are all the advantages of full frame and few or none of the disadvantages, opposite for compact".

    Video vs stills.
    'Blah blah blah. Video isn't important that is a stills camera.".
    'Blah blah blah. Stills aren't important. It's all about video these days.".

    Add, rinse, repeat for every aspect of the camera - Dynamic range, low noise, focus speed shooting sports.

    The fact is they are all tools and they're all tradeoffs. You have to buy the right camera for the kind of photography you are doing. The one you're willing to carry. The one which has advantages you are likely to use. You can use a full frame camera for long lens sports and birding, but you'll do better for less money with a crop sensor as you'll get more reach, especially in good light where noise isn't as big of a problem. Likewise if you're trying to shoot portraits with classic out of focus background the depth of field is going to be better on full frame. If you like more depth of field it won't matter.

    • -2 votes

      You don't get more reach on a crop. You get a smaller projected image which is like cropping a full frame image… It is NOT the equivalent of have a longer focal length zoom lens.

      • +1 vote

        This depends on the resolution of the sensor. If you’re comparing a 24MP full-frame sensor and a 24MP crop-sensor (APS-C) camera, in good light the crop-sensor will capture more detail with the same focal length.

      •  

        Thanks for demonstrating exactly what I was talking about.

        If you have a 24 MP full frame camera, you get less pixels on your subject zoomed in to 300mm than that if you have a 24 MP crop sensor camera. So i you're going to compare a crop sensor to a full frame, that full frame better have more megapixels. More pixels on a well focused subject is going to give you more detail which is important in many kinds of sports and wildlife photography. Examples: It is critical to get pixels on the bird when birding. It can be the same at an airshow where you constantly need more reach and you need pixels on that very different bird. Likewise if you're shooting sports - whether it's a child or an adult, you can't always move closer.

        Also note that you can still get a reasonably priced xx-300mm lens, whereas once you step up to 400mm+ prices go up quickly and there are more compromises on the cheaper lenses. So if you need to be able to take images of distant or small subjects on a budget, you are much better off in practical terms with a crop sensor.

        So it isn't all marketing when they talk about "equivalent" or "effective" focal length.

        Edit: Forksnorter beat me to the punch by 3 or 4 mins but my answer is more verbose so I'll refine it and leave it up.