Which Side of The Home Security Approach Are You on?

According to this report: https://www.theage.com.au/property/living/aussies-ramp-up-ho...

  • one in six homes are now monitored by CCTV cameras
  • one in five has an alarm
  • about one in six households use a video doorbell

But:
- one in five people still do not lock their doors
- almost 40 per cent of people did not have or use window locks
- only 25 per cent of respondents relied on deadbolt locks

I am certainly in the second group, but I'm very lucky to live in a safe area with few other people about.

I did notice this in the article:
- about 15 per cent of people felt they had a dog up to the task of guarding their home.
I'm pretty sure most people have a dog for reasons other than security. Ours barks a lot, but is hopeless at instilling fear.

Comments

  • +17

    My neighbour has a dog. Does that count?

    • +2

      If that dog barks at people / strangers on your property, it wouldn't hurt.

      • +31

        Yep. I used to be a bit annoyed with the neighbour's dog until one time the dog would not stop barking and I looked out from my upstairs window and saw some rando looking over my fence. Now everytime the dog barks, doesn't matter what time of day/night it is, I will just look out my window to double check.

        • +6

          They've trained you well.

      • +5

        Make sure it's a big dog. My sister had a fox terrier that would never bite anybody but would incessantly bark at strangers. When her house got burgled the thieves killed it, presumably by stomping on it as it had massive internal injuries.

        • :(

        • F

        • +2

          How awful, that is my worst nightmare

        • +1

          Was going to say that she had to then return to her old world of remorseless killing, seeking vengance on the sadistic criminals who also stole her car, only to now be in hiding due the the large bounty on her head from the near destruction of the Oz criminal underground… but really does make me feel sick that someone would do that.
          Sorry to hear, totally screwed up.

      • +8

        Yea, studies and interviews of criminals have shown that barking dogs deter opportunistic burglar or at least makes your property a lot less attractive compared to others.

        It probably won't save your belongings in a targeted break-in or if the burglar has picked your property already.

        I'm probably in the middle. Windows are locked and screened, cars are locked. Motion spotlights and a dog. No security system, CCTV or alarms - although I'm considering installing one.

        The plus side is i'm in the least attractive house in the street. No cars parked outside, only one plain Japanese car in a street full of utes and SUVs. Also helps that there is terrible public transport to my area because most of the crime in our greater metro area is committed by itinerant youths. I left my garage open by mistake overnight and everything was still there in the morning. I did get one nice sprinkler stolen off my front lawn so now I just use shitty ones.

        • Are you me? In all seriousness though, this resonated with me.

          • @desert eagle: you got a nice sprinkler stolen off your front lawn too????

            In all seriousness. Its probably the ozbargain sprit of practicality (Japanese cars, least attractive house in the street etc). We're also more likely to gravitate towards the middle response rather than going overboard if its not necessary.

    • +8

      My neighbour is a dog. Does that count? He likes to stay outside in front of the house
      puffing away and barking at people that pass by.

      • Twice as risky then…consider it. Your house has its own risk then the robber trying to rob your neighbor house will be put off and just rob your house and go. So therefore you're twice at risk. You should immediately inform your insurance company.

    • +2

      Just put an ISIS flag up in front of your house. ASIO will monitor your house 24/7 and it'll be free

  • +4

    2nd group too. probably helps that the home is rarely empty
    .

    • -1

      No 'home invasions' in SA?

      • +2

        our walls are 35% floor to ceiling glass, so a locked door won't stop them
        .

        • +6

          It's not about stopping them, it's about deterring them.

      • +3
  • +1

    All of the first group.
    Plus dead locks and window locks which are a requirement of our contents insurance

    • You mean they won't accept deadlatches?

  • +1

    don't video doorbells just record when the doorbell is actually pressed?

    • +3

      I think some are motion activated, but happy to be corrected. I don't even have a ding-dong doorbell.

      • +4

        motion activated, records the video and saves it.

        • +2

          The Ring requires a subscription @ $40 a year per device. It is also Motion Sensitive.

          • @BewareOfThe Dog: I got skybell no subscription, they keep video for 7 days or so on their cloud
            had it for about 5 years now, great
            https://skybell.com/skybell-hd/

            • @Hearthstone: Purely out of interest, have you ever had a need to access it?

              • +1

                @GG57: I have not need to access it and my house look like a fortress from the road, it high up looking down, CCTV is visible just looking at the house, they need to walk a fairway to the front door and they get tracked by the Camera so there are much easier target if they want to rob

                but I used it all the time because of my house connectivity especially before covid-19, I get delivery they press the bell, no one home I talk and see them through the Camera and open the garage remotely for them to put the stuff in and I close the garage after I seen them dropped the delivery off.

    • +1

      No, some also act as motion detection cameras

    • +1

      Depending on if you have any kind of recording device for cameras in place already, then a few doorbells can be registed as an onvif camera on the recorder, in layman's, record 24/7

    • +1

      My smart doorbell/intercom doesn't have a camera, but it has motion detection that when triggered makes the camera above the entrance start recording.

  • +7

    All my valuables are stored at Ocker's place with all the locks. No point trying to rob me!

    • Does tax hike, inflation extra tax count as robbing ? Asking for a friend.

  • +19

    My local facebook group every week without fail has at least 1 case of a break in.

    The other day this lady had just spend thousands on a brand new u-beat sparky installed security system…only to have crystal clear vision of guys with masks breaking in, waving at camera and continuing to loot the house.

    • -1

      Hopefully it was sufficient for her insurance to cover her losses.

      • +8

        Pretty sure you don't need video to make an insurance claim.

        • Of course, but some insurance companies probably want to make sure that you had the security system that they required as part of their requirements.

          • +3

            @GG57: My elderly neighbour's house was broken into last Christmas (maybe because our house is very obvious there is ample security cameras) - they had no security system and got some money out of insurance, but unfortunately most of it was more sentimental worth than actual value. Totally irreplaceable stuff dating back generations.

            • -2

              @Jimothy Wongingtons: Unfortunately, we can't insure for sentimental items that can't be replaced.

          • +1

            @GG57: I've never seen a home insurance policy that requires security cameras but yeah, if that's a requirement on your policy then sure.

            • +1

              @apsilon: I'm saying security system, you're saying security cameras.
              Not necessarily the same thing.

              I don't think cameras are a deterrent.

              • +1

                @GG57:

                I don't think cameras are a deterrent.

                Agree, I don't think they make a difference nor do alarms. Regardless, cameras, alarm, whatever, I've never seen them as a requirement on a policy.

          • +2

            @GG57: No insurance company 'requires' a security system, at least not the 15 or so I've looked at over the past few years. If you say you have a security system you will probably get a reduced premium; but if you in fact do not have the claimed system then then insurer might deny cover. However, if you say you dont have a system they will still insure you

        • +3

          Not, but a good tip (now, before you get robbed!) is to take a 360 degree photo and/or video in each room in your house.
          If you get robbed, this will help you list everything that was taken for the insurance claim, as well as providing evidence to the insurance company that you really did have a 100 inch television 😄

          • +1

            @Ugly: I can't agree with this enough. We tell all of our clients to walk around their property filming everything they can think of and store it to the cloud.

    • +2

      Get a better system that notifies your phone as they step on your property.

    • So no alarm and no-one actually monitoring the security system?

      I get notifications with screenshots/videos of detected people, and the cameras have alarm sirens and floodlights themselves. Sounds like their system wasn't too "you-beaut".

      • Well she definitely had the video/pics just no alarm I guess - or maybe they were away/not looking at phone

        • -1

          They probably should have thought about then. When I go away I give my brother/sister/trusted neighbour a temp login to my camera system so they will be alerted and can set off the camera alarm if they see anyone trying to break in. If they do break in, the monitored alarm system will trigger instantly as well and the police are alerted within a minute if I don't answer the phone and confirm that it's a false alarm.

          Without monitoring the deterrent factor is diminished, though still there and much better than nothing. With my doorbell I can answer it via speaker from my phone (as it comes through as a phone call) which also acts as a deterrent as I can pretend I'm home.

    • +1

      What area do you live in to be seeing so many break ins?

  • I ALWAYS lock my front door - but at least two of my neighbours don't.
    I think they are crazy.
    And my video doorbell captures movement, and ringing.

    • +6

      Maybe it is reverse psychology; doors not locked = nothing to take.

  • +12

    As old mate told me once "Locks are only good for keeping honest people out".

    • +5

      it do be like that

    • +8

      If they really want in, locks won't stop them but it can go some way to stopping opportunistic thieves who are looking for easy targets.

      Walking in to an unlocked house is much easier/quieter than having to break a window/lock.

      I've got electronic locks now, some internet connected, and my first thought was the security risk of being hacked but then I realised there is probably more chance of someone just busting the lock anyway.

      • +4

        Also Insurance most likely won't cover contents if there is no evidence of a 'forced' entry'.

  • +1

    group 3 those that live on the streets?

    • GoFundMe for djones145 ?

  • +3

    Where is poll?

    We don’t live in Fort Knox, but doors and windows locked, except when we often forget one.

    Have been out for a full day and come back to an open garage. Have had to ask friends to go check the back door after getting to a holiday destination - it was unlocked.

    Often leave a stashed key out for others (ourselves).

    Have a few cameras, but honestly since I’ve installed them haven’t even looked at the footage so no idea if still recording. They are a deterrent at least. Usually leave a timer lamp and timer TV on when on holidays.

    • +1

      I think your comments are most likely aligned with most people's experiences (but maybe it depends where people live).
      Make best efforts, but we are human and overlook things sometimes. Same as being too keen to lock the door and realise the keys are inside. Thank goodness for the one window that is never locked.

    • +1

      Lamps and TVs on a timer are a bit of a giveaway that you aren't home if someone is casing your place over a number of nights. WiFi switches however will allow you to create a bit more of a 'random' schedule of lights/noise from night to night.

      • +2

        True that timers are perfect. But to the casual observer, it adds to the appearance of someone at home.

        TBH the bigger giveaway for us is when the caravan is not on the property.

  • +12

    Cameras for security? I thought they were to catch lazy AusPost workers ding-dong-ditching…

    • -1

      Yes, I don't consider a CCTV as a deterrent for someone intending to commit a crime.

      • +1

        Might not be a deterrent, but I can literally check every corner of my property at a quick glance, and I also have motion alarm that lets me know when to look at cameras when people are out front (usually for visitors and uber/food deliveries). Not to mention there are 4 of us that could be watching the cameras 24/7 as we are up all hours between us. Nobody is getting onto the property without someone paying attention. Also my house is the shittiest looking on the street. makes it less of a target.

    • +1

      Newer cameras with AI human detection can give you a fairly reliable advanced warning, they also have audio/visual intruder alerts that could startle opportunistic thieves like a parcel thief.

    • +1

      For a while there I remember so many of the posts on the local area Facebook group were photos of crims just before they stole the security cameras.

  • +14

    A katana. And many years studying the blade.

  • +1

    No security at my place, unless I put bars on all the windows and doors it would be pointless as once they have decided to break in to my place they're going to do it anyway. I just hope they break a small window near the lock instead of breaking a big window and jumping through.

    • +1

      Some people think that deadlocks would prevent that, in that the door couldn't be opened even from inside. Getting in is one thing; getting out with your valuables is another.

  • +2

    I was robbed, Back security door wasnt locked by my lazy wife and the sliding door lock "latch" might as well be non existent as they jimmied the door easily and walked in my house and took all my money, they just took money and thats it….

    LOCK UP YOU HOUSE and get better security locks make it harder for the vermin to get in…

    I say they "just" took money, it was quite a lot, I made a huge error in life (and my safe wasnt good enough and I learned never leave money lying around) and have now paid for it, stressed angry and saddened by it all.

    • how much?

      • +2

        Also curious.

        I think it was an inside job, the wife prolly left it unlocked on purpose, and gave the combo to the safe.

    • IMO the more safes you have, the harder it is for crims to know which ones to break into. Also bolt them all down.

  • +3

    locks keep out 10 year olds.

  • +2

    My place is sorta protected by being older. The front door might be unlocked but you can't open it unless you know the exact set of motions to use. Ditto on the side gate.

    They could break a window, but the ones out front all have established roses in the way so that's a reasonable deterrant.

    From stories I've heard from co-workers, cameras are useful when you go on holidays and leave your teenagers to mind the house. Spots who turns up at the door.

  • +1

    Can’t we be in both groups? e.g. have video doorbell / security system installed, and because of these deterrents don’t always lock up.

    • If you think they are a deterrent, why not?
      I don't think they are. At best, you may have a video of the people after the fact, but that won't get your belongings back most likely, and even if insured that doesn't replace any items that are more personal than valuable.

  • +1

    We tend to use deadlocks etc, have front windows barred and only Spider-Man could get into our back yard without being very noticeable. But we also live in the CBD. Actively looking at a security camera and light for our back lane. Mainly to dissuade the odd dog crap owners and cats.

    Things are changing. There are an amazing number of folk who are trying to pay for drugs that will take opportunity- and are looking all the time. It’s no big deal, it’s just a fact of life to manage.

  • +2

    Crimsafe screen door + deadlock on the front door.
    Lockable windows all round
    Locked gates on the side
    Large Bull terrier cross in the back

    • -1

      Lockable windows…

      Do you always keep them locked, or does human nature kick in sometimes?

      Large Bull terrier cross in the back

      Would your dog stop someone breaking in at the front?

      • +1

        Cmon the dog will protect the house when it won't eat the drugged T bone steak chucked to it .

      • +1

        Do you always keep them locked, or does human nature kick in sometimes?

        They’re sliding windows that automatically lock when you close them, and part of the routine of leaving the house is checking they’re all closed so, rarely would they be forgotten.

        Would your dog stop someone breaking in at the front?

        No, but he’d probably be at the side gate barking his head off, which I hope would put them off.

        Remember, you don’t have to make your house impenetrable, just less attractive than the neighbours house.

  • +2

    Those statistics probably aren't accurate.

    If someone wants to get into the majority of places, its easy. The only thing that works is deterrence of getting caught.

    If you don't have security bars on all the windows then they can get in, and its rare for people to get security bars due to the cost and look of them.

    • I agree; the survey was apparently undertaken by Finder, which has an insurance-related side. And the quoted results are not too surprising (to me) for some of those items, probably related to the area that those respondents live in.
      My view:
      - CCTV cameras don't prevent break ins
      - Alarms might, if they are audible to others nearby who are inclined to have a look at what is going on, or if they are directly connected to a monitoring service that responds immediately (or the police)
      - Video doorbells only provide for an opportunity to determine if you want to open the door or not
      - Locking doors is not a huge deterrent, if the offender is determined enough
      - Same with window locks
      - Deadbolt locks (if used properly) could limit how easy it is for offenders to remove your stuff

      • +1

        Never heard of alarms preventing a break in, it just turns into a smash and grab.

        CCTV is great as a deterrence though, any type of technology is mainly because the thief will not be 100% sure what the technology does, what the response time is etc.

        For example, security cameras these days can identify a face simply being in your drive way, determine that they haven't visited the property before and notify the owner. This means that the police can be there silently and quickly… or they won't, the thief won't know.

        • I'm not sure I have anything of a high enough value to warrant the investment

          • +1

            @GG57: Since I bought cctv cameras many years ago, I could not live without them ever again. its way too convenient to have 360 degrees of view around the home

  • +2

    With the internet connected cameras you get notified when they are triggered so presumably if you were being robbed you could call the cops straight away and maybe that is a better deterrent then just a camera with no monitoring?

  • The survey sounds FAKE and alarmist in nature. I bet it is even not of our region. Possibly American.
    Sounds generated by a security firm for self glorification.

    You would have to live on a farm in the middle of nowhere in a tent to have no locks… in fact, you can even lock your tent.

    Walk around your suburb and ask yourself, how many abodes would have no locks….. its virtually ridiculous… it sounds more like an American survey, nothing to do with Australia.

    • -1

      So, you didn't read it?

  • +2

    Nice try OP, I see you are trying to figure out which fellow OzBargainer's house you should break into next ;P

    On a serious note, this reminded me that I should probably leave the house more.

  • +1

    Guilty of the 1st one - we have a converted garage and the kids come and go through the door during the day and we have to keep it open at night as all amenities are indoors. Though when we all go out the door is always locked.

    The car door though, bringing in toddlers, shopping, etc. is a real mission and often the last step of locking the front door gets missed.

  • +1

    My front door is off the street and covered and people say it’s a robbers dream, but it often gives me time and space to beat them to death and decide where to bury them. Also, blackberries likely take me off the crims list.

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