How Do I Cook Asian Food at Home?

I’ve been ordering Thai stir fry’s with the latest Deliveroo deals and now I’m hooked.

I’ve tried making Green curries, lemon grass chicken etc. and it tastes like sh*t even though I’m following recipes.

What the secret? Where should I be buying the sauces etc and where are the secret recipes?

Comments

  • +9

    I recommend the Spice Taylor curries and biryani packets.
    For recipes including Laksa I use https://www.recipetineats.com/laksa-soup/

    • I like the That Red Curry.

    • +10

      Best recipe website in the world!

      • +9

        Recipetineats is the best recipe website in the world.

        • +5

          Do you have to scroll for two hours through a story about how the recipe was inspired by a childhood memory from a holiday to Italy the author had when they were 3 years old before you can get to the actual recipe?

    • +1

      The spice tailor Indonesian rendang is delicious. My kids have both worked at Asian restaurants (Thai and Indian) and like most restaurants they use way more fat / lard than you would at home and also use msg so it would be very hard to replicate the dishes at home.

      • +2

        Msg is not hard to find.

        • -4

          It's not about it being hard to find. Asians don't generally use msg in home cooking because it's not good for your health.

    • That laksa recipe does look nice, but the paste isn't that good, believe it or not, the best laksa paste you can buy is made by Maggi and the Osha one is ok too, add a spoon of chilli jam to the laksa and a small spoon of ghost chilli if you have got it, also kaffir lime leaves is essential to the laksa base and thai basil and bok choy at the end, next time you make your laksa, throw in a huge handful of thai basil leaves right before you serve it, its a game changer

  • +40

    The secret is to cook from scratch. 99% of bottled/ canned sauces taste very poor.

    • +1

      this!

    • +5

      But if you want bottled/canned sauces, buy imported overseas made brands. Sauces made locally have been altered to suit local tastes!

    • True, this goes for all cuisines really. Those pre-packed Indian curry pastes from the bottles/ sachets are never going to taste anything like the ones made from scratch. The salsa from a bottle in the supermarket is never even close to the same as the freshly made one. And so on…

  • +73

    Marry an Asian is the ideal solution

    • -28

      but the easiest solution to get bankrupt

      • +1

        It pays to get educated! Watch youtube and find out about cultural changes. Cultural adjustments are needed.

    • +5

      that however, is not the cheapest version.

    • +2

      That'll come with a whole new set of problems.

      • +4

        and solutions!

        • +1

          For every solution there is a least 2 new problems.

    • +9

      Bad idea, not all Asians can cook.

      • +3

        In fact, most cannot. I once casually asked a Thai colleague as to what % of adults in Thailand can make nice pad see ew or green/ red curries, close to what they sell in restaurants and he laughed. He said even 10% would be a 'very' optimistic answer. I don't know the reality but I would tend to believe him :)

        • +7

          That's probably a better % than if you ask the number of Aussies that can make a Chiko Roll.

    • -1

      do you know how many of them cant cook!

      • +2

        everybody can cook,

        whether it tastes good is a different thing all together.

        try before you sign on the dotted line.

        • +1

          haha. thats what I mean. I can cook too - a lot of things but whether its marriage worthy is highly doubtful!

      • It's true. Most cannot cook as eating out is really cheap. My Vietnamese wife had to learn cooking when she moved to Australia. She never cooked in Vietnam as it was convenient and dirt cheap to order food or eat out.

        • -2

          Lol she's a lazy as one. You marry the wrong girl!

        • +1

          The wealthier they are the less likely they are to cook. You need to find a poor person.

    • tinder a Hokkien they know how to cook. Like any deal double check!

    • -1

      Love you long time.

  • +3

    Thai green curry use marions Thai green curry kit, can't go wrong and so deliciousssss

    I think why it taste so good because all the herbs are dried and really brings out the depth in flavour

    • We had this for dinner tonight. I'm a noob chef so this was perfect for me and we loved it.

  • +16

    There'd be stacks of youtube videos that you can watch - just stay away from Jamie Oliver's Thai Curry videos! 😂

    • +17

      I put my leg down when you said his name!

    • +2

      Check out uncle roger's review of Jamie's Thai green curry https://youtu.be/vksB2S90FVY

      • +3

        Yep Uncle Roger is the boss

        • +1

          FUIYOH!

    • +1

      Jamie Olive oil

  • +5

    You tried the same amount of sugar, salt and oil they put in take away food?

  • +19

    More fish sauce.

    Use MSG.

    • +13

      Hai ya

      • +2

        Uncle Roger on ozbargain?

    • +1

      Fui yoh~!

    • keeeng of flay vah.

  • +14

    by Asian, you mean Thai?

    like all Asian kids, master cooking rice first, followed by frying an egg… once you have passed that, you can level up to cooking instant noodles,

    one step at a time mate. no short cuts here

    • -4

      master cooking rice first

      https://tiger-corporation-us.com/kitchen-products/rice-cooke...

      This isn't the 1600s no one cooks rice manually

      • +9

        different cuisine has different types of rice, the rice is also different consistency, even for the same cuisine rice can also be different.
        - rice you would cook for sushi, is different to rice you would eat in donburi.
        - rice eaten in Korean cuisine is a different consistency to that eaten in a cantonese restuarant.
        - basamati rice Vs jasmine rice.
        - vietnamese long grain rice Vs broken rice.
        - not all rice cookers are made equal either,

        if you think all rice is the same, cooked the same, taste the same, texture is the same then you also have much to learn,

        the rice cooker is a tool, yes it will make it easier but understanding the process of rice cooking is a skill in itself.

        • +3

          if you think all rice is the same

          Never stated that

          • not all rice cookers are made equal either,

          Get a Tiger rice cooker

          yes it will make it easier but understanding the process of rice cooking is a skill in itself.

          Just press the buttons needed on the machine and done.

        • +1

          I eat Sunrice Australian brown rice made with a Tiger rice cooker lol

        • Basmati rice being the most expensive of all I reckon..

  • hire someone…https://www.atyourtable.com.au/private-chefs-melbourne/

  • +5

    Buy your ingredients from the Asian grocery store (Asian brands).

    Use a wok.

    A little bit of MSG goes a long way.

  • +13

    The secret? For take-away fast food flavour? They use Maesri Paste (or Mae Ploy).

    Maesri paste, Coconut cream/milk, Sugar, fish sauce. That's all you need and you'll get that sweet salty takeaway flavour.

    Look in the kitchen of your fav takeaway Thai joint and you'll seriously see Maesri tins stacked up. Easiest curry ever. Don't skimp on the sugar or fish sauce.

    • +6

      Yes, this is the secret. Get the Maesri paste and it will taste identical to your local Thai takeaway. Also best to use a good quality coconut milk, the cheap ones are too watery.

      • +3

        Yep, I go by the fat content. Some cheap 'coconut creams' have more water than good quality coconut milks! Anything 15-25% is good. Don't go lower than 10 or it will taste watery.

        • a lot of chefs say the tetrapak coconut milk is better than the canned; may be more a perception than reality but they feel the canning process affects things. Of course, they all say 'make your own from fresh coconuts' but no one does that

          • +3

            @dtc: The coconut milk/cream that comes closest to the one we hand-make in Asialand is the Kara brand. It also comes in different size packs, but if you don't use all of it in one go, it freezes well too.

    • +12

      Good answer. I used to work in a Thai restaurant without a Thai person in sight lol. Cook and owner were a Sri Lankan couple, assistant cook was Bosnian I think, wait staff was a mix of Indo, Malay and myself HK Chinese Australian. It was your typical neighbourhood Thai restaurant, but having tried many other Thai restaurants and even visited Thailand since then, i'd still rate their green curry up there as one of the best I've enjoyed, and they use Mae Ploy. Here's what i remember… open up a tin of coconut milk and add a splash into the saucepan first on high heat, to toast it slightly along with one table spoon of the Mae Ploy green curry paste. Before it burns, add about half a can of the remaining coconut milk, one tablespoon of sugar and about 5 splashes of Thai fish sauce from the bottle. Add in raw chicken breast strips (or meat of choice) cook in sauce for about a minute or two before adding sliced carrots and precooked potatoes (cubed), wait another minute, then green peas, green capsicum and a couple of Thai basil leaves(very localised veges, i know). Add dried chilli flakes to taste. Be sure to serve with good jasmine rice. It's that simple, have cooked it many times over the years and everyone loves it. Sometimes i like to mix up the veges and use baby corn spears or eggplant. Happy cooking!

      • +1

        Forgot to mention to use palm sugar. Tastes better than with just white sugar, but the latter would do if you're in a pinch.

      • Sounds freaking delicious. I'm legitimately going to try this.

  • +1

    lol

  • You need to have the noodle dream first

  • +4

    Q: How Do I Cook Asian Food at Home?
    A: bring asian gf/wife to your home - but easier to buy outside, cheaper in long term

    • But remember rice will be rice. I had once an arrogant customer of Celtic origin. He was a bit of a racist but once he married a Singaporean. Then he tells me: All ok except when mother in law in house the "flied lice" was overwhelming him.

      • +2

        Still sounds like a racist flog, tbh.

        • true but he learned a lesson very quickly.

          • @payless69: And what lesson was that?

            • -1

              @Charmoffensive: I actually managed to get him to fork out some money to pay for his Singaporean to do different cooking courses.
              Last he told me he was now very happy with her. As for me I just love fried rice and if done right my pasta consumption is much smaller.
              Choosing the right rice, washing it with filtered water and cook it to the perfect point. Amazing what can be done with it!

              • +3

                @payless69: You talk about his wife like she's his property. Like he had a dog who he had to train to work for him correctly.

                It's kinda gross.

                • @Charmoffensive: Lost contact with him! I do NOT own a dog. I believe humans should not abuse the natural environment of animals.
                  If the food is spiced right I can survive vegan, no issue with me. Last night I swapped Thai for Korean food. I am flexible!

  • Its how you use your Wok.

    Get a good one (I use a good electric one with dual heating coil). Lot of heat, oil, garlic, sauces, meat till brown, then veg. Dont use too much ingredients and kill the heat then it just boil, keep the heat up.

    Rice I'm lazy and use a rice cooker on the side, wash rice, few drop of sesame oil and pinch of salt.

    • +1

      The size of your Wok can also make a difference so I’m told.

      • +4

        wok envy i see,

    • +1

      Electric wok. Already fail. Where your wok hei?

    • +3

      Well, you can tell by the way I use my wok
      I'm a woman's man: no time to talk

    • Electric wok? Wok that?

  • +1

    Plenty of Advice here on how to do Fried Rice.
    A powerful gas burner and decent wok are the key.

    • A 3.5kW induction hob from HK is so much cleaner.

  • +1

    Can anyone recommend a wok for an electric cooktop?

    • +1

      Check the advice received in the Post above this in regards to Fried Rice.

  • +7

    I lived with some Chinese when I was a student. They taught me this amazing and simple recipe.

    You have to go to an asian supermarket and buy "fermented shrimp paste". It's really smelly but tastes great when cooked. It can be replaced with genuine oyster sauce, but maybe won't be as good.

    Fry bacon in a large frypan or wok at very high heat, then add Chinese greens (pak choy or bok choy or choy sum (or even Gai lan) and the shrimp paste. Fry for a bit, then turn the heat down, add a bit of water and cover with a lid for a few minutes until the greens are cooked. Don't overcook. Serve with rice.

    Or you can vary the recipe and add pre-fried tofu (not soft tofu) when you put the bacon in the pan. Cook it long enough for the bacon taste to penetrate the tofu. You can even add fresh tomato for a bit of tang.

    • +2

      Fermented shrimp paste is why do many old school asian households have a burner/kitchenette outside lol. Let the neighbours enjoy the smell rather than trap in your own house

  • The key is to add soy sauce to every dish you're cooking. When eating, add chilli oil/paste to everything (or you can add it while cooking too). I don't even use a wok, I just use the OZB favourite Lodge cast iron deep fry pan.

  • +7

    Add some MSG, i’m not joking.

    • +1

      And ghee/lard, lots of that too.

  • -2

    Do you know how to get to YouTube and watch it ?
    lol :)

  • +1

    This guy makes a fantastic Chicken Korma…
    I hear he may be currently looking for a job and a place to stay…

  • stir fry? oil and heat pan, add asian frozen veges, cook on high heat until looky good, set aside. oil pan, add protein of choice, cook until not raw. add veges back in, add plenty of chosen sauces. bit of soy (not too much) and plenty of oyster sauce. high heat and mix well. add salt to taste. use sesame or peanut oil if you're feeling it, otherwise i just use rice oil. serve with cooked rice or get the cold hokkien noodles from the cold section and add them into the mix.

  • +2

    https://hot-thai-kitchen.com has some great authentic Thai recipes. Pailin is Thai and lives in Canada so gives some good substitution ideas too.

  • -1

    make sure to drain your rice with a colander

  • +2

    Make friends with Asians. They’re happy to teach you, and they also are the most authentic. Having mixed race herarige myself. I’ve eaten some pretty horrible westernised Asian food my Aussie friends and family have made. I helped them do better 😊

    • +1

      Mama's making Kantong though.

    • +1

      the first time i ate rice at someone else's house, i finally realised why white australians don't eat rice on the regular

  • -1

    To make Asian food from scratch, first you must create an overseas travel plan and marry a Thai person.

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