TP-Link HS100 Smart Plug $24 Pickup or + Delivery @ JB Hi-Fi

1270

Another company price dropping to compete with the $23.95 Bunnings deal.

Good alternative if you don't live near a Bunnings/Officeworks, or nearby ones don't have stock.

If you live near a JB Hi-Fi, the advantage over the Amazon $24 deal (which requires you to have Prime or order at least $49 worth of eligible items) is that you can get it the same day with Click and Collect. Of course the advantage with Amazon is that you can get a 3.5/4.5% cashback from Cashrewards/Shopback. The disadvantage with Prime is that there is a masked delivery cost that offsets the savings from the cashback, possibly making it more expensive than this deal.

Not as good as the now limited stock Bing Lee $29 deal which with the current 20% off store wide code (ending Mon 10 June) comes out at $23.20, but only if you are lucky enough to take advantage of the free in-store pickup (and the price isn't jacked in the meantime EDIT: it wasn't).

Finally, if you are paying for delivery, JB Hi-Fi < Bing Lee < Amazon (at least to Perth metro, using the cheapest options).


Note that this is the model without Energy Monitoring. You need the HS110 for that.

Downloads (available from the support page):

Specifications:

  • Size (H x W x D): 100.3 x 66.3 x 77 mm
  • Weight: 131.8g
  • Power button (to manually turn output on/off - includes embedded power and Wi-Fi indicator LEDs)
  • Settings button (to connect device to the app, or to factory reset it)
  • System Requirements: Android 4.1 or higher, iOS 8 9 9.3 or higher (App Store now says 9.3)
  • Operating Temperature: 0-40ºC
  • Operating Humidity: 5-90%RH, non-condensing
  • Hardware Version: V2
  • Protocol: IEEE 802.11b/g/n
  • Wireless Type: 2.4GHz, 1T1R
  • Input voltage: 220-240VAC
  • Output voltage: 220-240VAC
  • Maximum Load: 10A
  • Maximum Power: 3.68KW 2.4kW (see this comment and the official Product Overview Datasheet) (mirrored here)
  • Limited 3-Year Warranty

Related Stores

JB Hi-Fi
JB Hi-Fi

Comments

  • +31 votes

    Upvote for an informative and well-structured post.

  • +2 votes

    Hello ozbargainers, what do you use this for?

    • +4 votes

      make your dumb devices smarter; i still think Brilliant plugs are slimmer in size with the exact same functionality, added USB slot and slightly cheaper in price too. In saying that, I haven't seen HS100 in person, so can't confirm the accuracy on the size statement. Though, I have seen Medion (Aldi) Smart Wi-Fi plug and they're humongous.

    • +36 votes

      (Just from the last four OzBargain deals for the TP-Link HS100.)

      Plasma TV: read this together with this.
      Heater/burglar/lamp: read this.
      Electric blanket/standby power: read this.
      Kettle/lamp: read this.
      PC: read this entire thread.
      Toilet fan: read this. (I'm planning on doing something similar by using a smart plug and a smart globe so I can turn off the light but leave the fan still running for a set time after leaving my single switch bathroom.)
      Heater: read this.
      Coffee machine/lamp: read this.
      Home alarm siren/lamp: read this.
      Sunset/lamp: read this.
      A heap of uses mentioned in this thread.
      Wi-Fi cameras: read this.
      Security cameras: read this.
      Coffee machine/dog heat pad: read this.
      Sunset/lamp: read this.
      Electric blanket: read this.
      Slow cooker: read this.
      Keg bar: read this.

    • +4 votes

      I got this exact unit for a birthday present last year.

      I plugged a Google home mini into it and set it to turn off when I say "Ok Google: Die."

      Otherwise uhhhh… I guess you could hook a lamp up to it or something if you're too lazy to walk over to it.

      •  

        Have a read of the comment directly above yours for a few more ideas ;)

        (Love your "killing" Home Mini idea, though!)

      •  

        Do you know it never actually dies? It listens all the time.

        •  

          Can't listen without power

          •  

            @anthonaut: Yes, if you actually plug it out from the power point.

            •  

              @drazenm: You missed the whole point of SenpaiAndre's post.

              The Google Home Mini's power supply is plugged into the HS100 which is itself plugged into a GPO (power point). The Mini is then set to control the smart plug. When told to "Die" it does just that - by turning off its own power.

              Technically speaking, it commits suicide.

  • +2 votes

    You have done your research hey OP; don't know what your fetishism with this TP-Link Smart Wi-Fi Plug but well done.

  • -2 votes

    This device only issue is the bulky shape other than this this is the best wifi socket in terms of built quality,connectivity and response time.Its app and build quality is far better than the similar features product from bunnings(brilliant) or xiaomi at this price range.I have a few of these and now waiting for its HS110 energy measuring version price drop..

    • +1 vote

      × connectivity and response time ×

      Please do tell. Do you own Brilliant plug hence the comparison? What do you mean by connectivity? Brilliant will drop out from WiFi intermittently? How so with the response time? Unresponsive when triggered from Tuya app?

  • +1 vote

    Time to use those $10 jb Hi-Fi e-receipt vouchers if you have them!

  •  

    it's not 'better' than the Amazon deal if you live 1.5hrs return from a JB Hi-Fi store and have Prime ;)

    •  

      how much do you pay to become a Primer ?

      • +1 vote

        Less than the cost of your time, fuel, wear and tear on your car driving 1.5 hours to pick up an order.

        •  

          wear and tear on your car driving 1.5 hours to pick up an order.

          but i take bus

          •  

            @tempura:

            but i take bus

            There’s still a cost to public transport even after taking out the pecuniary aspect.

            •  

              @Slave1: agree but I also don't watch the below ↓

              You also get the benefit of Prime TV which i've started using a bit and a nice little bonus …

              and I have all the time in the world nor do I have any wear and tear; it's the bus driver's issue.

    •  

      And live 1.5hrs from a Bunnings with stock.
      And live 1.5hrs from an Officeworks wi… NVM. Officeworks don't have stock ;)

      🤔 Actually, still better than the Amazon deal even if you have Prime (annual) if you make less than 12 purchases a year:

      JB Hi-Fi @ $24 + $4.99 delivery = $28.99 < $29.36 = Amazon @ $24 + $59 ÷ 11

      :P

      • +1 vote

        Your assumption that I make less than 12 purchases is way, way off - i've made that many purchases in a week for prime day deals alone… You also get the benefit of Prime TV which i've started using a bit and a nice little bonus… Add in your 3.5/4.5% cashback from Cashrewards and Shopback which you don't get at JB, Bunnings or Officeworks and i'm way ahead… Like I said 1.5 hrs return, plus petrol costs and the Amazon deal is much better personally for me though that won't be the case for everyone - point simply is that the JB may be better for some but not necessarily the better deal full stop ;)

        •  

          point simply is that the JB may be better for some but not necessarily the better deal full stop ;)

          so in essence, you argue that this following (below) line should be altered? it all boils down to the word better.

          better than the Amazon $24 deal (which requires you to have Prime or order at least $49 worth of eligible items) as you can get it the same day with Click and Collect.

        • +1 vote

          All jokes aside, you do have a valid point.

          I have edited the deal to show the advantages and disadvantages of both stores.

          PS My maths is wrong too as I omitted the cashback. It should be less than 10 purchases a year ;)

  •  

    OP, I believe they changed the specs - it used to list 16A max surge load, to protect it from spikes. The HS100 datasheet for AU states 10A but 3.68kW, which is 230v x 16A.

    Also here are the specs - your datasheet link is broken.
    https://www.tp-link.com/au/home-networking/smart-plug/hs100/...

    •  

      The HS100 datasheet for AU states 10A but 3.68kW, which is 230v x 16A.

      which is what I said.

    •  

      I blew up a HS-110 and a Brilliant plug, my own fault trying to switch a load that was a bit too large (hot water system).

      They both switched the load off and on a handful of times before failing, and both exhibited the same symptoms when blown. They would switch off and on, you could hear the relay click off and on just no power was output.

      So from that limited testing, neither was better than the other electrically/mechanically and i wouldn't be surprised if they had the same components inside. I've seen inside the Brilliant plug and it's very well made, i might have to take apart a HS-100.

      •  

        I've seen inside the Brilliant plug and it's very well made, i might have to take apart a HS-100.

        Please do and once you've done so, please report back with your findings and close this rivalry.

  •  

    I keep seeing these deals and think I want one but can't come up with a real reason to get one.

    What is everyone doing with them?

    •  

      you'll see his comment here for your answer.

    •  

      The same plus all the "Brilliant is better" comments is making me hold back on the TP-Link and go for the other one.

      The reasons to want one, I am sure I can make something up to convince myself.

    •  

      Yeah same here. I believe the jist to use with dumb devices. Those do not require you to physically press a button/flick a switch to activate them when the power at socket is turned on. Most of my things all require a button pressed to activate them. But i could definitely use for things like christmas lights and lamps when away from home.

      •  

        to physically press a button/flick a switch to activate them

        you still have to physically press a button in your phone to activate them? if this is what you're implying, then you using it all wrong.

        •  

          Haha now that would be funny. Though you can if not big on voice commands/scheduling/shelling out for yet more devices to listen throughout your home. No I was referring to my case where unfortunately most of devices such as my heaters, electric blanket, kitchen appliances require button to be pressed to activate after power on. They cannot be left on an activated status like an older/simpler style mechanical switch allows.

  • +1 vote

    thanks op! didn't have anything to buy with the $10 voucher… i do now!

  • +1 vote

    Hello smart electric blanket

  •  

    So how do deal with white goods that have an on/off switch ? rubber bands ?

  •  

    Got 2 at Bunnings Morley yesterday for $47.50, great price, good and reliable brand.

  • +1 vote

    good find this will go perfectly in my new kitchen to turn on and off the built in LED lighting. Now just waiting for the nest hub max

  •  

    Bought one this morning. Setup was easy and simple to get working with the Google Home mini.

    • +1 vote

      Great price! But:

      • It's Low Stock or less in every store (and apparently selling fast).
      • Click and Collect is only available in 4 locations across Melbourne.
      • Shipping is more expensive than any of the stores detailed in the deal at the top (at least to Perth metro), and the total price is also the worst if you factor in Amazon's Shopback cashback (i.e. JB Hi-Fi < Bing Lee < Amazon < Centre Com).
      • Credit Card and PayPal incur a 32¢ surcharge, though you can Bank Transfer or Zip Money for free.
  •  

    Sorry for a noob question but can I control the switch installed at home from my work? (like with no home wifi connection)? If so, I will be happy. My wife leaves usually leaves iron switch on before we leave home for work

    •  

      like with no home wifi connection

      no

    • +2 votes

      I think you could set a timer on the device so that it switches off every day, say at 9am. Can someone please confirm? I’m on the couch and my phone is on the table and I don’t want to get up to check out my own setup.

      •  

        Great tip! If you don't have Wi-Fi at home, the alternative would be to set the iron to automatically turn off every day at 09:00 or so.

        And yes, the HS100 can do this as the ability to set events where the device just switches off, or on, at a specific time each day is one of the basic functions that all smart plugs are capable of. (It's the same as the only function that 24hr dumb plugs are capable of.)

    • +1 vote

      An alternative to realist123's solution of using a set off-time would be to use the Kasa app's countdown timer feature to automatically turn off the iron after a certain amount of time has elapsed.

      Of course, you have to remember to set the timer before using the iron!

      However, using a more advanced smart home setup (e.g. Home Assistant, Amazon Echo, Google Home, …) and IFTTT, you could automate this so that turning on the iron's smart plug would automatically start the countdown timer.

  • +1 vote

    I'm waiting for the HS110 model to go on sale, since it has real-time and historical energy use tracking.

    According to Amazon these use 3.68 watts per hour.

    3.68w x 24 hrs = 88.32 watts x 365 days = 32236.80 watts = div 1000 = 32.23kw/hr x 27c = $8.70 in power costs per year, per device??. say you bought 8 of these devices to plug around the house, that's $69.60/year in energy costs just to run 8 of these units??? Did I miss something in my calculations?

    •  

      The idea of a smart plug is that you don’t have them on 24/7.

    • +4 votes

      According to Amazon these use 3.68 watts per hour.

      Actually, according to Amazon, the "Wattage" for the HS100 is 3.68 (no units).

      (The "Wattage" for the HS110 is 3680 Watts, so by "these" I presume you mean the ones in this deal, i.e. the HS100. If you meant the HS110, then everything in this comment still applies except that the "1.1W" values need to be replaced with "1.2W" or possibly higher as the AU type is still only at V1.)

      Now first off, the correct missing units are actually kW, not W.
      Secondly, the word "Wattage" should actually be "Maximum Power", so as to avoid any confusion between that and "Minimum Power" or "Consumed Power" (which is what you assumed it was). Amazon have stupidly replaced the words from the official specs, which most likely would not have caused a problem if they hadn't also forgotten to include the units!

      You can confirm this by looking at the Specifications page on TP-Link's website.

      "Maximum Power" is the maximum power rating of the device, i.e. the maximum power that can be supplied to a connected load. It has nothing to do with the power actually consumed by the device.

      (As an aside, that 3.68kW power rating is itself incorrect, though precisely what it means is still being debated. I'm claiming it's the fudged peak power rating, whilst wolfshooter is claiming it's the fudged maximum instantaneous power rating. Follow the now-fixed links in the actual deal at the top for further info.)

      Now, the actual consumed power rating of this, and a lot of other smart plugs, is hard to come by.

      Fortunately, someone has posted some real life test results which I will repeat here:

      Device off on
      TP-Link HS110 V2 1.2 W 1.8 W
      TP-Link HS110 V3 1.0 W 1.8 W
      AVM FritzDect 200 0.5 W 1.3 W

      So, the current consumed by a device is different depending whether it is off or on. Whilst these figures are for the HS110, I would expect the figures to be similar for the HS100 V1. (The HS100 only comes in V1 and V2, and only V1 is available for the AU market.)

      Since the HS100 is missing the power monitoring circuitry, I would guess it probably uses less currrent than the untested HS110 V1. For argument's sake, let's assume 1.1W when off and 1.8W when on, and run through the maths.

      Off: 1.1W × 24hrs = 26.4Wh × 365days = 9.636kWh × 27¢ = $2.60 per year
      On: 1.8W × 24hrs = 43.2Wh × 365days = 15.768kWh × 27¢= $4.26 per year

      Did I miss something in my calculations?

      Actually your maths is correct and only out by a factor of two (at the maximum) due to the incorrect starting figure. However, I would expect that, since most appliances that you would use with a smart plug would be turned off rather more than turned on, the figure would be closer to the $2.60 mark than the higher $4.26.

      There may be a net savings to be had if you had a lot of appliances connected to one HS100 and if the sum of their individual standby power consumptions is quite a bit more than the 1.1W off power consumption of the smart plug.

      For example, if the set of appliances was turned off for 16 hours out of the day, their total standby power consumption would need to be more than

      (1.1×16 + 1.8×8)÷24 = 1.33W

      for a net savings in running costs. Using a typical value of 0.3W standby for modern appliances, this means you would need five or more such appliances.

      • +3 votes

        Forgot to add this:

        If your intended usage is to minimise standby power consumption, then you really need a ZigBee type of smart plug like the Samsung SmartThings. Since ZigBee is a different, low power wireless protocol, you can get power consumption figures of 0.3W when off and 0.6W when on.

      • +1 vote

        Thanks for your detailed reply. Very helpful!

      •  

        Minor correction. Just bought an HS100 and it's actual a V2, so they are available for the AU market.

  • +1 vote

    This post did all my thinking for me

    • +3 votes

      Not quite 😉

      I just posted a rather long comment just above. When you have finished reading that, even more of your thinking will have been done for you.

      (Plus I still have a couple more comments I need to reply to!)

  •  

    Can you use the hs110 just to monitor the power consumption of your device around the house (like a refrigerator)? Just to know if it consumes more power than in its specs (old fridge)

    • +1 vote

      I planned to do the same thing as you and ended up having my RCD tripped off :( I guess this thing is only good for low power devices like a router. Unless you want to experiment how to reset an RCD, do not use it for hair dryer, iron, washing machine or dish washer. My lesson was learnt the hard way

  •  

    Warning guys. If you want to buy this or HS110 models, please do not use it for high power devices. I plugged this into my washing machine which is 2200W and the smart plug tripped my RCD off. The smart plug specs says it should handle up to 3.68KW which is NOT TRUE. Never believe what China says!!!

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