Help Me Climb Uluru - Last Chance to Climb Is Tomorrow, Can I Get There from Sydney in Time?

This is my plea to the OzBargain community. I know it's last minute and will appreciate all your help.

CAN I GET TO THE TOP OF ULURU BEFORE IT IS CLOSED FOR GOOD?

Tomorrow is the last chance anyone will have to climb it. On the 26-10-2019 there will be no access and a closing ceremony.
I'm looking for a return flight or car / camper hire to get me there. I am on the central coast but would fly from Sydney or Newcastle and or hire transport from between Sydney and Newcastle.

PLEASE NO LECTURES, OR EDUCATING ME ON ULURU.

Please list the best deals you can find. Getting to the top is my main focus. I would like accommodation but I can figure that out myself. I'm sure I'm not the only one interested in a deal for this.

Thanks in advance.

Comments

  • +2 votes

    There are no deals.
    Plan ahead and get a deal for the future, to enjoy the experience of visiting this sacred place.

    • +5 votes

      It's a rock.

  • +28 votes

    Buy a private jet and skydive out of it onto Uluru, that's how I'd do it.

    • +2 votes

      Yes, OP should do that, and live-stream it.

  • +34 votes

    i was going to write something but i'm sure it would just get deleted as a personal attack

    so i won't.

    but you know what i'm thinking.

    • +19 votes

      Yep, only a fool would publicly declare they want to do that and only a total idiot wouldnt be able to figure out how to get there.

      • +4 votes

        you said it not me :)

    •  

      That you want to buy me aircon. Thanks man.

    • +5 votes

      Hire and drive, definitely.
      You should be ok to start driving tomorrow morning; get there for sunset.

      • +1 vote

        31 hours drive from the Central Coast according to Google maps, tomorrow morning will be too late.

      • +3 votes

        Walking is another option.

  • +1 vote

    Why do you want to climb it?

    •  

      Why have any experience.

  • +18 votes

    I've been there and climbed it, was boring, don't bother. Or wait til they reopen the climb again in 6 months.

    • +18 votes

      Because for fear of missing out?

      • +1 vote

        I know we want to mock the op, but I'd be far more interested in seeing something somewhat impressive in nature than a bunch of buildings in a city.

        •  

          People are still more than welcome to see Uluru. No-one is stopping them.

    • +19 votes

      I don't have a vested interest nor bone to pick either way, but how shallow have we become that there's a scramble to do something pointless in full view of a native population pleading you not to and to respect their customs and traditions.

      I really do not understand it. Is that instagram show-off picture really worth it?

      • -4 votes

        There's something to be said about not caving in to the irrational demands of random people.

        • +2 votes

          I mean do you take your shoes off when you visit an Asian household? Do you try to avoid rude things like not sticking your middle finger up at people or spitting on sidewalks?

          This is exactly the same thing. The aboriginal people have called Uluru their sacred home for thousands of years. To them, it's you literally dancing over the grave of their ancestors. Sure it may seem irrational to us, but disrespecting a culture is not worth the thrill of climbing a big rock or getting a decent picture to me.

          • -5 votes

            @lolz112: What say for each taxpayer-funded handout given to traditional landowners, we get 1 admission to the rock?

          • +1 vote

            @lolz112:

            To them, it's you literally dancing over the grave of their ancestors.

            Literally? I didn't realise they built Uluru as a cairn.

  • +3 votes

    Talked to the national Park today and they advise it will never open again.

    • +5 votes

      then you should know why you shouldn't climb it.

    • +22 votes

      Same way hungry jacks was never going back to paper based offers

      Give them a couple years and they will run cultural tours climbing the mountain - right now they cant make any money off it

      • +11 votes

        This is the most correct comment in the whole thread! No one can resist the sweet sweet Chinese tourist cash to climb it.

        • +25 votes

          Everything is sacred until you need cold hard cash.

          •  

            @tshow: Money is certainly my sacred mens business.

    • +1 vote

      And John Farnham, and others, just had one last tour…

  •  

    There are SYD-AYQ-SYD direct flights on Virgin or Jetstar.

    Around $450-550 return, arrive around 12.30-1PM.

    •  

      Or if you can get down to Melbourne Jetstar has flights or around 250 one way but gets there at 11:15am

  • +1 vote
    • +1 vote

      "The climb can be dangerous. Too many people have died while attempting to climb Uluru. Many others have been injured while climbing."

      Fair enough.

      • +12 votes

        Vast majority were old and/or unhealthy people who died of Heart Attacks. They would have likely died undertaking any other strenuous exercise in hot conditions. Others went off the prescribed path. Nothing about the climb is inherently unsafe if you are healthy, wear appropriate shoes, bring water and follow the path.

        •  

          …too late now. :(

        •  

          if safety that has anything to do with why it's being closed, most national parks will have to be closed.

      • +7 votes

        Too many people have died while attempting to climb Uluru.

        Many people have died doing far less consequential things…

        It's arguable that if you gotta go, then there are worse ways to go than dying whist enjoying one of this nation's natural treasures.

        Please don't climb Uluru

        Followed the link, read the entirety of the content on the site, and frankly still couldn't objectively see anything that articulates the reasoning for the suggestion that I shouldn't want to climb Uluru.

        I'm happy to be educated… in the meantime, I'm looking for co-investors in an Uluru skydiving adventure business.

    • +1 vote

      Is there somewhere to learn more about the cultural reasons behind it? The spreadsheet linked to on that page says:

      "We ask vistors not to climb Uluru because of it's spiritual significance as the traditional route of the ancestral Mala men on their arrival at Uluru."

      But I'm having difficulty finding out what that actually means? I have found these two references of what I believe this statement is about -

      https://www.australianexplorer.com/mala_walk.htm
      https://parksaustralia.gov.au/uluru/discover/culture/stories...

      Is this something that I would have to go to Uluru to learn more about?

      • +2 votes

        It's like an ANZAC memorial to locals, people get offended when you climb on top of things they worship.

        • +1 vote

          I understand that, I'm trying to understand the story mentioned better. The story as told in those two different websites both seem… incomplete. The first website's story is copied from a book that is (as far as I can tell) only available to borrow for the National Library of Australia and is 32 pages long:
          https://trove.nla.gov.au/work/31685614?selectedversion=NBD11...

          The second website (official government website) tells the story and then makes this statement:

          "This story teaches that it is important to finish what you start and that you should watch for and listen to warnings of danger."

          I understand the second part of that statement, but the first is not something that seems shown in the story as described.

          • +6 votes

            @SlowCarSlow: I visited Uluru earlier this year (did not climb), but I came away with much the same feeling. I read all the available information and tried earnestly to understand the indigenous stories about the place, but I really came away with less understanding of its spiritual significance than I thought I had before I went there.

            I think the reasons for that are 1. translation difficulty (across culture as well as language), and 2. the versions of the traditional stories they translate and tell to tourists are very basic, like the versions they might tell to young kids. In indigenous culture the stories that are told get more complex and advanced as people grow up and are initiated into higher levels of knowledge. So coming in as an outsider you can't expect to be told everything, or even to understand it if you were told it. The downside of that is that is quite hard to really get an appreciation for the culture as an outsider even if you have the best intentions.

            Being told the anangu people prefer people not to climb was enough for me, but I have to say I after visiting it don't really understand why.

            •  

              @moph: The reason the stories are basic is because outsiders aren't allowed to be told. So they're only told basic things they're allowed to tell you.

        • +1 vote

          nobody gets upset if you follow the trails in memorial gardens.

          In fact, I was discussing with local RSL leaders regarding whether it was okay giving out pamphlets on ANZAC day inviting people to hear more about what the ANZACs achieved in WWI, and the response was along the lines of "anything to promote the memory of the ANZACs is more than welcome".

          In the Ayers Rock scenario, maybe people with a history with the rock should be honoured that anyone would want to visit it.
          Then yeah, I totally agree with staying on trails and not leaving rubbish. But both sides need to be reasonable.

          •  

            @SlickMick: Just be careful not to use the Rising Sun logo on your pamphlets, as it is against the law to use it without the permission of the Australian Army. They can be contacted at [email protected]

  • +9 votes

    Climbed it during an off peak time. Everyone climbing was respectful, friendly and said hello to each other sharing a sense of camaraderie. You can really appreciate the different formations on the rock up close and view of the surrounding area is fantastic.
    Was a great experience.

    OP if you really want to climb stop wasting your time here and just book the flights regardless of the cost. You will regret it more not giving it a go.

    •  

      "Everyone climbing was respectful" - respectful of who?…

      •  

        Other gubbas

  • +8 votes

    Everyone climbing was respectful

    Hmmmm

  •  

    If you feel like climbing something sacred, go climb a church or go for a leisurely run through a cemetery. And you don't have to pay for transport all the way to Uluru.

    • +1 vote

      that won't get you any likes/followers from insta post

      •  

        Will get you karma on reddit though

    • +3 votes

      LOL… Given the dwindling congregations, there would likely be many churches that would welcome the extra attention.

      Assuming the church isn't under some sort of preservation order that would get the parish into strife, I personally wouldn't have a problem with people climbing my church. Heck, my childhood church has a massive metal spire that would be quite the challenge.

    • +2 votes

      It's.. disrespectful to run in a cemetery? Noone told me.
      I played hide and seek with my niece just last year, after my grand papa's funeral.

    • +1 vote

      It's a rock not a church.

      A rock that has been sitting there for millions of years, long before any humans came along.

  • +3 votes

    Need to get there in the morning, they won't let you start your climb after a certain time. Too hot.

  • +3 votes

    Plenty of other options.

    Why not do the sacred Sydney Harbour Bridge climb?

    •  

      The climb and jump?

  •  

    Last Chance to Climb Is Tomorrow

    What world do you live in ?

    Easy enough to break a rule and climb it at your leisure .

    Just be careful with your arse and watch out for the spears :)

  • +2 votes

    http://www.bom.gov.au/nt/forecasts/yulara.shtml

    The weather forecast for tomorrow is decent. If it's above 36C or too windy the climb is closed. Ideal climbing time is in the morning so you're really pushing it by flying during the day.

    I climbed it last month. It was a lot of effort and something of a 'now or never' type thing to do, but the view from the top is very underwhelming. The rock is honestly far more interesting viewed from the ground.

    • +1 vote

      Not much of a "view", but once at the top it really made me appreciate Australia (how vast our country is) and the Indigenous people who were able to navigate and survive off the land for so long.

      • +2 votes

        Not wishing to downplay your experience, but you would have either flown or drove to Uluru, which should have given you an appreciation of the vastness of Australia.

        • +1 vote

          This. Or circumnavigate Oz by car (or by bicycle - yes, people do it) and you’ll get a solid grasp of just how big this country is.

          •  

            @Ozpit: Exactly. Climbing Uluru would probably only give a view of ~100km to the horizon.

  • +1 vote

    Google Flights is reporting Virgin SYD-AYQ at 9:55am, arriving 12:05pm for $439. The airport is really close to Uluru so you'd get there by 1pm after hiring a car. Then you have about 5.5 hours max to climb. It's enough time, but if the climb is closed due to weather you're going to be awfully disappointed.

    •  

      Gotta book your car tho - chances are they’re booked out this late in the game. None will be available as a walk up.

  • +3 votes

    Cheaper to climb Mt Fuji, travelling from the central coast.

    •  

      +1. Mt Fuji is stunning. I had fun hooning up it.

    • +5 votes

      How dare you suggest climbing something with such strong traditional and cultural symbolism to the Japanese people?

      Seriously. People climb all sorts of things. Mt Fuji, Eiffel Tower, Macchu Pichu, Angor Wat, Statue of Liberty, etc.

      •  

        People can climb those things listed because they are (currently) allowed to.

        There are also plenty of places / sites that people are not allowed to climb.

      • +1 vote

        Ha! Its not such a bad thing if you expire climbing Mt Fuji in comparison! It wont upset the tourism drive to the area, and cheaper/easier to remove the expired tourist and their selfie stick from Mt Fuji than the big red rock.
        Can't take a tourist bus halfway up Uluru either.

  •  

    Nah, I am good.

  •  

    Don't you have to book or something. I assume it would be mighty busy on the last day. Good luck

  •  

    I've climbed it. Doesn't really help you out though, tall about leaving it until the last minute lol. Plenty of other cool stuff to see there.

  • +2 votes

    If you can't even work out how to get there, there's no chance you can work out how to climb it.

    Stick to an indoor rock climbing centre

  •  

    Do it on a Sunday when the caretakers are in church.

  • +3 votes

    Why have you left it to the last minute?

    • +2 votes

      It has only been there for around 600 million years…

      • +3 votes

        Not according to Creationists. Just 6000 years old.

  •  

    You're terrible Muriel!

  • -3 votes

    How can a bloody rock be sacred? It's a rock… honestly!?

    •  

      It's a rock

      The Martin Place Cenotaph is also a piece of rock, which is carved into human shapes. But, if I were to climb on top of it and place, say, a traffic cone on top of one of these human-shaped rocks, then a lot of people would get very upset.

      https://www.smh.com.au/national/nsw/public-apology-for-disre...

      •  

        So, how many hours did the local aboriginals take to carve Uluru?

        • +2 votes

          The Martin Place Cenotaph is a 'sacred object' and given respect because of the meaning that is attached to it, and what it represents to Australians, and particularly war veterans.

          It has nothing to do with the effort taken to carve it.

          A copy of the Australian flag takes little effort to create, but is still given respect when it is raised in a ceremony. The Australian national anthem takes little effort to play at a football stadium, but everyone stands and still gives it respect. In each case, it is the meaning that the object is given by others that determines whether it is considered worthy of veneration.

          In Uluru's case, it is clear that Aboriginals consider it sacred. By closing down the climb, and foregoing the tourist revenue, they have shown through their actions that their respect for the place is real.

          The wishes of Aboriginal Australians deserve to be given as much respect as the wishes of veterans regarding the Cenotaph.

          • +1 vote

            @vikvance: Nope - Each one of your examples takes at least some effort to create the item, and as such, the creator (or owner) then has some inherent rights over how the item is used.

            The rock is a natural feature and took exactly zero human effort.

            Would you support a local aboriginal group being able to declare say Bondi Beach a sacred site, and stopping anyone from ever again setting foot on it?

  • -2 votes

    I can get there by 3pm tomorrow.
    Can anyone recend accommodation?

    •  

      Get a swag and sleep outside, that's what I did but I was with a tour group.

      •  

        This.

        Almost impossible otherwise now to get accommodation without being gouged. The campgrounds at Yulara and a swag/tent way to go.

        You're not really allowed to just camp publicly or pull over in the national park. You'd risk a fine but perhaps the rangers will turn a blind eye this time of the year.

        •  

          Assuming Super doobie is actually serious, they might be out of luck regarding accomodation until the flight home. In that case I recommend using the shower facilities at the campground to freshen up before the flight home. There's no security guard checking ID. Just walk in.

    •  

      Yulara camp ground may be your best bet. Plenty of space, although you do need to prebook and you need your own tent. No camping is available anywhere else.

  • +2 votes

    I hope the OP reports back later whether they managed to get to Uluru