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Budget Gaming PC | Ryzen 5 3500X CPU | GTX 1660 GPU | B350 MB | 120GB SSD | 16GB RAM | Flair Case | $689 Delivered @ TechFast

1810
BUDGETARSE

Awesome specs & price for this budget gaming PC. Doubt you'll find anything near this price. Apply code BUDGETARSE for discount, with delivery anywhere in Australia. Offer ends Jan 2 6th Jan, unless sold out or withdrawn prior. Enjoy :)

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  • +6 votes

    Awesome cheap rig. Waiting for pay to hit my account so I can jump on it!

  • +2 votes

    Great investment, excellent starter PC for the next Ninja, Shroud etc.

  • +13 votes

    Don't know how this is so cheap, those specs are ridiculous for the price.

    Thanks TA!

    • +27 votes

      It's cheap because the 3500X is unusually great value from AMD, but sadly it is an OEM only part. The GPU is Galax, but you can get an Asus 1660 for $309.

      The motherboard, SSD, and PSU are all really cheap; for example, here is a build I made from staticice with equivalent parts:

      • ASRock AB350M-HDV: $67 MSY
      • 550W no-brand PSU: $32
      • 120GB SSD: $28.89
      • 2x8GB 2400MHz: $39
      • Ryzen 2600: $185
      • Asus GeForce GTX 1660: $309
      • Deepcool Wave V2 mATX: $29

      Total: $699.89

      This build is slightly better than Techfast's because you get an ASRock mobo instead of Biostar, and the SSD is at least WD Digital instead of a unbranded SSD with unknown endurance and performance.

      Don't get me wrong, this is still a good deal because (i) shipping is included, and (ii) it's prebuilt, but it's cheap because the parts are cheap. The PSU might blow up on you in 2 years and ruin your PC, which might not be fun.

      •  

        Yeah that's pretty fair, when it comes to PC parts you want to get ones that last and don't fail on you.

        I always build my own PC's anyhow, but this one does look pretty good for the average user.

      • +16 votes

        2x8GB 2400Mhz: $78.

        Total: $728.89

        beep boop (math bot)

      •  

        2600 is not as good as the 3500x. The 3500x is about 15-20% better.

        This is ridiculously good value, but yes you will have to upgrade the psu either via techfast or yourself.

        •  

          If you do any productivity tasks, (which not everyone does, but even things like unzipping files in 7zip count), the extra threads of the 2600 substantially help. GamersNexus just published a good benchmark about 7 hours ago, you can see the 2600 being 20% faster than the 3500x.

          3500x can also be bought off Aliexpress for $110 USD.

      •  

        There's a PSU upgrade option available for those who have thoughts like this.

        •  

          Hiya. Longtime lurker, first time poster. Looking at getting this deal for my son who has been saving up for a couple years for a PC (mainly for gaming).

          How important is it to upgrade the PSU? 550W seems sufficient according to online calculators I've tried (which mainly suggest peak usage of about 375W for this setup). He's most likely to be using it 'as is' for a 3-4 years, not upgrading it any further, if that helps. Any advice?

          • +2 votes

            @pepsimax33: I reckon you'd be fine with the stock PSU. The upgrade to Gold offered is rather expensive. Techfast has often offered a Bronze PSU upgrade in the past, which I would recommend, but it's not offered here perhaps due to them running out of the Bronze because of other system orders. I've found when building that a quality brand name PSU contributes to overall system stability, but I've also used a system with a no-name PSU for years without significant issues.

          • +2 votes

            @pepsimax33: I would always suggest at least a brand name bronze, if not instantly than before too long. The problem with these cheap PSUs is they cut plenty of corners and often jut lie about the wattage. That's not going to be an issue as this setup shouldn't draw more than 350w.

            What can be a problem is voltage spikes and just lacking in features to protect the rest of your components. I've had cheap psus fry boards, ram , cpus, even hard drives.
            I've also had cheap computers that never experienced any issues.

            If you don't have any bad wiring or power issues in your home leaving it stock is a valid option, but even if just for peace of mind and stability consider the upgrade.

            The other point to make with this particular setup is the lack of a secondary drive and small primary. That 120gb figure is going to be closer to 90 or 100 (overprovisioning/restore/GB->GiB etc); With win10+updates, office, some programs you're likely looking at ~60-70GB usable in explorer; ideally leaving 10+gb empty so the system doesn't slow down.

            I'd suggest grabbing a mechanical drive for all games/media/other; ssd for os and programs. It's easier to do this early so everything is setup correctly. You can move the files, and reinstall things on the right drive or use Win10 Reset tool to bring you back to new.

            When your son needs a new hard drive, consider a bronze 450w psu at the same time. The Seagate BarraCuda 7200rpm is a good value fast drive I'd suggest if gaming is more important than a larger capacity slower drive.

            $55 looks to be the going rate for a Thermaltake and SilverStone Bronze 450W psu and $80 for a 2TB BarraCuda 7200rpm.(https://www.staticice.com.au)

      • -1 vote

        The price difference is MUCH bigger than you present it to be, i dont know why you got 21 upvotes.
        You have to pay shipping for every INDIVIDUAL component, which adds A LOT and 2600 is MUCH worse at games compared to 3500x

        It's not 'just a good deal', it's INSANE how you can get a pc for these specs PREBUILT and DELIVERED at your door

        EDIT

        Link where gamersnexus suggests 3500x is WAY BETTER than 2600 at games
        https://youtu.be/n57N1T3haWk?t=935

  • +2 votes

    I like TechFast, but not purchasing this because I'd rather get a decent PSU and decent mobo. The base model is awesome but I'd like a PC that lasts for 4+ years.

    If you upgrade mobo and PSU it becomes a lot less of a good deal.

  • +1 vote

    Any chance of a deal without the video card so I can transplant?

    • +3 votes

      I’ve asked this previously and they don’t do it because they want to be able to boot and install the system with a GPU to guarantee it works before sending to you. Reasonable on their behalf IMO even though it’s irritating haha

      • +2 votes

        Yep, that's correct.

        •  

          In that case is there any chance of ordering one of these with an ultra low spec vga card just to satisfy the boot requirements? Something like an R5 230 or a GT710 maybe?

      •  

        Ah fair enough, won't disagree with that.

        •  

          From time to time they offer a great build with a very cheap GPU option where I think the intention is that they can ship a system that boots, and you can transplant your GPU. Or live happily and Ozbargainly ever after with your video bottleneck.

      •  

        That can’t be the actual reason as they are happy to ship the components unbuild.

        So it’s not like they’d build the system, test it, then pull it apart and put the components back into their boxes to then ship it.

        •  

          But if they ship unbuilt they are not liable for the build not working on arrival as a “prebuilt” system. If there’s a dead part it’s up to the buyer to diagnose and request RMA etc.

          So tech fast wouldn’t be on the hook for trying to troubleshoot an issue other than replacing faulty individual parts (which is generally very easy).

          If they ship a prebuilt system without a GPU how can they guarantee it works when the user puts in a GPU, has issues, then complains blaming tech fast. A nightmare to support and diagnose from tech fast point of view.

          •  

            @Skramit:

            But if they ship unbuilt they are not liable for the build not working on arrival as a “prebuilt” system. If there’s a dead part it’s up to the buyer to diagnose and request RMA etc.

            How is that any different to if they supplied the system pre built? Didn't realise Techfast came to your house and run all the diagnosis themselves if you ordered it to be built by them…

            So tech fast wouldn’t be on the hook for trying to troubleshoot an issue other than replacing faulty individual parts (which is generally very easy).

            So if the system arrives and doesn't boot, how is Techfast meant to diagnose it as opposed to if the customer puts it together themselves?

            If they ship a prebuilt system without a GPU how can they guarantee it works when the user puts in a GPU, has issues, then complains blaming tech fast. A nightmare to support and diagnose from tech fast point of view.

            The exact same way that someone would have to diagnose the problem if it came pre build by them with all the components?

            Are you seriously trying to suggest that if Techfast don't build the PC, and it has any issues they can just wipe their hands of any warranty on any component simply because they didn't built it?

            •  

              @Porthos:

              So if the system arrives and doesn't boot, how is Techfast meant to diagnose it as opposed to if the customer puts it together themselves?

              I dont know techfasts support policies, but I imagine if the prebuilt system is DOA you do some basic troubleshooting then simply ship it back whole. Because techfast built it and installed windows it was working before shipping, so they can at least guarantee it was working prior to shipping - so much less chance of this happening. It gives techfast peace of mind that systems arent going to arrive DOA because of a faulty part from the manufacturer.

              With shipping unbuilt parts, theres no way for techfast to know if a motherboard or ram or cpu is faulty when shipped out, a part thats dead from the manufactrer. So when you assemble the system, theres also the chance the user broke something like bent pins or assembled incorrectly like not plugging GPU power in or something dumb. WHich might be easily resolved, but would take techfast support lots of time on the phone dealing with nupties who dont know how to assemble a PC. The onus of responsibility shifts from completely on techfast to be shared with the end user who built the system.

              Are you seriously trying to suggest that if Techfast don't build the PC, and it has any issues they can just wipe their hands of any warranty on any component simply because they didn't built it?

              Not at all. But RMA processes would take over for individual faulty parts, rather than having to spend 3 hours on the phone trying to troubleshoot which costs money (to have somebody from techfast on the phone all day). Theres a difference in time and effort from techfast here. RMA'ing a faulty GPU is a simple matter of pack it up, ship it back to techfast who ship it back to the supplier via RMA processes.

              The exact same way that someone would have to diagnose the problem if it came pre build by them with all the components?

              The difference is, with a prebuilt system they have tested it prior to shipping. So the chances of part failure is basically 0 unless postage issues. With unbuilt parts or a system with no GPU, theres always a small chance of a faulty part when the user receives it. That way techfast minimise the need for tech support when the pc parts or system arrives.

              Do you understand that is the difference here? Testing before shipping vs not testing before shipping. If its just shipping parts, the responsibility for the system shifts to the customer, and techfast only has to worry about a simple RMA process if a part is DOA.

              •  

                @Skramit:

                I dont know techfasts support policies, but I imagine if the prebuilt system is DOA you do some basic troubleshooting then simply ship it back whole. Because techfast built it and installed windows it was working before shipping, so they can at least guarantee it was working prior to shipping - so much less chance of this happening. It gives techfast peace of mind that systems arent going to arrive DOA because of a faulty part from the manufacturer.

                From comments in their previous deals, there's barely one that doesn't have at least someone with an issue from a previous deal, whether it be DOA or intermittent issues. That's just the nature of PC parts in reality though, especially when you're going bottom of the barrel quality wise.

                With shipping unbuilt parts, theres no way for techfast to know if a motherboard or ram or cpu is faulty when shipped out, a part thats dead from the manufactrer. So when you assemble the system, theres also the chance the user broke something like bent pins or assembled incorrectly like not plugging GPU power in or something dumb. WHich might be easily resolved, but would take techfast support lots of time on the phone dealing with nupties who dont know how to assemble a PC. The onus of responsibility shifts from completely on techfast to be shared with the end user who built the system.

                That's on them then, and up to them to prove the fault was caused by the customer. Same as any other system/component purchased from any other retailer in Australia.
                If Techfast don't want to support that, then they shouldn't allow their systems to be shipped without being built. Also on that, they don't lower the cost of the system if they do just ship just the components, so they can't then just wipe their hands on any support/issues when they're still charging the customer the same as they are to someone they do apparently build & test the system for. They still ship out a 'complete' system, when/if they allow customers to not purchase certain things (such as say a GPU/HDD/RAM etc) then they are selling a full system so (IMO) have to support it as such. Again, it's up to them to prove an issue has been caused by the customer as opposed to a fault with the parts that they supply and I don't see any waiver that people have to agree to to get the system sent unbuilt (it's literally just asking for it in the order details).

                Not at all. But RMA processes would take over for individual faulty parts, rather than having to spend 3 hours on the phone trying to troubleshoot which costs money (to have somebody from techfast on the phone all day). Theres a difference in time and effort from techfast here. RMA'ing a faulty GPU is a simple matter of pack it up, ship it back to techfast who ship it back to the supplier via RMA processes.

                Go read their T&C's and point to me anywhere it mentions the difference between Techfast building the PC and the customer being sent the parts unbuilt, it's not mentioned at all from what I can see.

                The difference is, with a prebuilt system they have tested it prior to shipping. So the chances of part failure is basically 0 unless postage issues. With unbuilt parts or a system with no GPU, theres always a small chance of a faulty part when the user receives it. That way techfast minimise the need for tech support when the pc parts or system arrives.

                Their 'testing' seems to leave a lot to be desired. They literally use the cheapest parts they can get their hands on, of course there's going to be failures when you do that.

                Do you understand that is the difference here? Testing before shipping vs not testing before shipping. If its just shipping parts, the responsibility for the system shifts to the customer, and techfast only has to worry about a simple RMA process if a part is DOA.

                Of course I do, but you seem to be of the opinion that they can just wipe their hands of any responsibility with DOA parts simply because they sent the PC unbuilt. Again, that's up to Techfast to prove the fault was caused by the customer.

                As I said before, please point to me in their T&C's where they make the distinction between shipping a system that's built or unbuilt, as well as what the reduction is in price for just shipping the system without them building it/testing it. Also please do point out where in the ACL it shows the difference with responsibility as well that Techfast can shirk when they just post out a system that's unbuilt compared to being built.

                •  

                  @Porthos:

                  you seem to be of the opinion that they can just wipe their hands of any responsibility with DOA parts simply because they sent the PC unbuilt.

                  You seem to be assuming something I'm not even close to saying. Learn to read TBH.

                  Not sure why you have chip on your shoulder about it too. Techfast can sell machines however they choose to suit their business model. If you choose to buy parts only from techfast, you wear the responsibility of RMA'ing any defective parts. Simples.

                  •  

                    @Skramit:

                    You seem to be assuming something I'm not even close to saying. Learn to read TBH.

                    Pretty rich coming from you.

                    Not sure why you have chip on your shoulder about it too. Techfast can sell machines however they choose to suit their business model. If you choose to buy parts only from techfast, you wear the responsibility of RMA'ing any defective parts. Simples.

                    Ah, so you can’t counter any of the points I raised, so go straight for the ‘chip on your shoulder’ line. Forgot this is Ozbargain, where certain retailers and members have immunity from being questioned at all.

                    I’ll say it again

                    As I said before, please point to me in their T&C's where they make the distinction between shipping a system that's built or unbuilt, as well as what the reduction is in price for just shipping the system without them building it/testing it. Also please do point out where in the ACL it shows the difference with responsibility as well that Techfast can shirk when they just post out a system that's unbuilt compared to being built.

                    •  

                      @Porthos: It’s basic common sense. It’s how the pc industry work globally.

                      If techfast or any computer shop ship you parts only, they are not responsible for the completed system you build. If it doesn’t boot it’s up to you to diagnose each part to fault find and RMA the defective one back via the reseller to the manufacturer. That’s just how it works. Do you disagree?

                      Everything else you said is irrelevant.

                      •  

                        @Skramit:

                        It’s basic common sense. It’s how the pc industry work globally.

                        Only in your own mind it seems to.

                        If techfast or any computer shop ship you parts only, they are not responsible for the completed system you build. If it doesn’t boot it’s up to you to diagnose each part to fault find and RMA the defective one back via the reseller to the manufacturer. That’s just how it works. Do you disagree?

                        Yes I do, as you don't actually seem to have a clue what you're on about. Hence the reason you can't even reply to any points I have raised with even a single actual fact.

                        I'll put it to you in a simple 'yes/no' questions as you struggle with anything else.

                        1. Is there anything in Techfast's terms and conditions that stipulates there's a difference to them between shipping a system pre build or as individual components?

                        2. Do Techfast sell individual components?

                        3. Is there a nominal fee reduction for shipping the computer unbuilt?

                        4. Is there any way the customer can choose to not include certain parts?

                        5. Is there any special terms and conditions that the customer agrees to when they ask for the PC to be sent unbuilt?

                        6. If they ship the system pre built and I change the RAM, does this then absolve Techfast of any DOA guarantees even if it's proven the issue isn't caused by the RAM I supply nor the installation of the RAM?

                        Everything else you said is irrelevant.

                        Oh the irony..

                        •  

                          @Porthos: Lol just stop. You’ve already proven to have zero clue about building PCs or the PC industry and RMA processes so there’s no point repeating myself if you’re off on some weird tangent.

  • +3 votes

    Can anybody recommend spending an extra $29 on 3200mhz memory?

    • -3 votes

      Better off buying 320hz ram off another site and sell the preinstalled ram.

    • +7 votes

      3200mhz RAM is probably the only upgrade worth getting. Everything else… GPU, mobo, PSU should be upgraded DIY-style for the best value.

    • -2 votes

      If you're going to upgrade any single component on that build it would be the Motherboard.
      Biostar is hot garbage, the MSI upgrade for $129 is well worth it.

      Having said that, Ryzen Zen 2 processor performance is dependant on RAM due to its 1:1 ratio with memory up to 3800mhz, so any upgrade to 3200mhz should also be considered.

      To me though if money was a consideration I'd upgrade the Motherboard now and RAM when you can.

    • +1 vote

      Fast RAM makes a big difference with Ryzen because of how the chip is designed. Do a search on Ryzen Infinity Fabric. For an extra 29 I'd definitely be upgrading.

  •  

    Is this build compatible with hackintosh? i’m looking for a ryzentosh to complement my iMac and MacBook Pro

  •  

    nice-arse promo code

  • +1 vote

    Great deal — I finally pulled the trigger. Thanks, TA.

  • +1 vote

    TA, you've done it again!

  • +1 vote

    Does this come with PSU? I know techfast share deals a lot but shouldn't they be required to provide more detailed info eg brands, exact parts and specs etc…

  •  

    Hi guys, a noob question. Is it worth to upgrade to 3600 for daily computing and run VMs? Thanks.

    • -2 votes

      Don't be deceived by the similar CPU names. The 3500X is a vastly inferior CPU compared to the 3600

        • -1 vote

          I can't comment on this bmk site, but watch two review videos listed by AEKaBeer below.

        • +5 votes

          Userbenchmark is not reliable anymore because they shifted their comparison algorithms to favor single core performance. Single core perf is of course important for gamers, but when the results are skewed so heavily you are no longer seeing the whole picture but rather only a part of it.
          Take their graphs and performance charts with a grain of salt and always use more than 1 benchmark site. If you have time probably watch the HW Unbox / GN YT reviews.

  • +2 votes

    A couple of good 3500X reviews from two reputable reviewers just came out today, worth a watch for those considering these 3500X systems.

    Hardware Unboxed
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wz-bHNkwHgI

    Gamers Nexus
    https://youtu.be/n57N1T3haWk

    • -3 votes

      yeh what a coincidence that these two 'reputable reviewers' both decide to put out videos on the same day for processors that has been released months and months ago! it's almost like they have some sort of agenda

      i'm not a big fan of the 3500x but i sense some bias in these reviews, the 3500x is significantly stronger than the 2600 in terms of single thread performance, because it uses zen 2 architecture over zen+, but they have chosen mostly titles that use more threads to make the 3500x look weaker. also they claim $155USD is for the price of the 3500x, but as techfast has said before they get a significantly lower street price, and the savings are passed on to you.

      google videos for 3500x vs 2600 for less biased benchmarks.

      • +1 vote

        What possible agenda could these two reviewers have in this instance? As far as 'reputable' goes, look up Steve Walton and Steve Burke, both of these guys are known for their excellent coverage and calling out companies for shoddy behavior in the consumer and enthusiast tech space.

        Them putting the video out on the same day doesn't do anything to the news cycle for the 3500X, it's been available for a couple of months now, it's a system integrator part with a focus on the Chinese market. Also both have different conclusions, GN say for the $125 USD people can get it for now from Ali is very good price for gaming (lines up with the pricing in this system btw), whereas HUB say it's cost per frame at the higher price they got it for isn't worth it at all. Both agree that productivity is weak, given that it tends to sit around the 6700k and 8400 in productivity, what's been presented looks bang on.

        • -3 votes

          probably something like this

          AMD marketing guy 1: hey guys the 3500x is cannibalizing our sales its Chinese market only omg
          AMD marketing guy 2: shit what do we do
          AMD marketing guy 3: lets contact youtube influencers and throw some shade at it
          AMD marketing guy 2: what but the 3500x was released 90 days ago who would want to watch a review of that shit?
          AMD marketing guy 1: don't worry we'll throw some $$$ their way
          AMD marketing guy 3: you're a goddamn genius

      • +1 vote

        A direct quote from the GN video:

        The R5 3500X actually did surprise us a little bit in its value because it can be worth it vs the R5 2600 […] At $124ish vs the $120 for the 2600, the 3500X is better.

        A lot of GN's hesitance on recommending it for the general audience was if you're buying it from China via Aliexpress etc. Since you're getting it locally via TechFast (with local warranty etc) that's not so much of an issue. I didn't watch the HWU review, but it feels like you didn't watch the GN review lol.

        • +3 votes

          "GN say for the $125 USD people can get it for now from Ali is very good price for gaming" you didn't read my post did you? :)

          Yes I watch all of both the Steve's videos, even the long deep dives GN is known for, he's got some great insight despite the monotone voice that can knock you out if you're not careful.

  •  

    Hi Luke,

    I literally just ordered a Ryzen 5 3500X / GTX 1660 Budget Gaming PC. Any chance I can pay for the difference and upgrade to this please?

    PS: If it is possible, can you PM your email?

  •  

    Hi rep, with a couple of upgrades, this works out to be a better deal than the PC I ordered from you a couple of days ago. Can you please help me change my order?

  •  

    Nice price

  •  

    My nephew wants to buy this, but with a few upgrade options… It says it won't accept the discount with changes to the PC?

  •  

    When do you expect to post a deal around 3900X? Thanks

  • -1 vote

    I would have pulled the trigger if it came with a monitor and keyboard.

  • -1 vote

    Tightarse what happened to:
    Leaked Bunnings Internal Market Link Plan - Full Video?

  • -1 vote

    I've had my techfast pc one year now. It came damaged with a big dint in the case and a broken gpu. Gpu was replaced by techfast after troubleshooting. DVI ports shit themselves after a month or two. Luckily the hdmi port works fine. The pc will stall just about every gaming session. Usually i just have to restart the game, but sometimes computer will bluescreen or just reset. Not sure if that's due to heat or low ram or buggy software. Gave the fans a good clean and it still does this. Overall still really good for the price. Any fence sitters should go for this deal.

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