Looking for Ideas for Side Projects

I am a software dev with a bit of time on my hands. I want to start some side projects and looking for some ideas.

My skills mainly lie in developing web applications but I also have experience with mobile app development. But part of this is about skills development so I'm up for learning and trying something new as long as it's interesting.

Is there something you kind of wish exists on the web? A problem which you wish had a solution? Even if you don't know the exact solution, let me know the problem and maybe we can discuss how it could be solved.

I'm looking for ideas which I can develop an MVP in about 3 weeks (about 30 hours part-time). What that means is I'd have to be able to break the idea down into something I could build in a quick and dirty fashion to test out whether the idea has legs or not. If there's potential, I'll keep going.

Comments

  • An app to control the shared data from a phone so you can turn off the hotspot automatic at certain times of the day.

    • have you looked into something like tasker?

      https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=net.dinglisch....

      • Does it let you control the hotspot?

        • i would say so - it's an automation interface that allows you schedule commands on the Android API.

          So if it's possible to do in an android app, it should be possible to do it via tasker.

        • Yes, but you'll need root access.

          • @miarn: Not on my Pixel 2 running Android 10 (Q). Just did it myself.

            Choose your trigger (state, time, location, etc).

            In the task choose Net > WiFi Tether. Choose state you want (On / Off / Toggle)

            It does state that for some devices you will need a root-only plugin to do it.

            Done.

            taskerprofile://H4sIAAAAAAAAAG1Sy26DMBA8h69A/oAYYwhUMpYq9dJbD/yABQ6g8Ihgy/d3d40iqvbk2Zl9eMc2tdsefv1w4OJtrYSI232ohBIx7JXIr2/XVNjoYr7W5T6MnnOeiHUq4t1XgtWLaVoH3qq8LG5lnqoyL3IjA8ny+LSwfnvkEBHjzwWZ0kWhjfSvgvvous2WRgZA1NBanRqJB0XT0CZWYw0DYubJ29pD79e4XrpuxGFEkVQPU7h5s8wJXxgn9Ny+P6LJJhhNIYLeKhThEIFFYNFIakaOyMMSwmQiDwAEWv/nSZoVt+zsyW8HEnQsPztA6+rXuu8NDMvMI1wDSfC+OFZplhYbKcxmxNznDCF77SjbjfSm8o+mDi0JmpFhEO9HS9konOGH2OgHRnbv2C8CAAA=

    • If you are on a samsung, wouldn't a bixby routine let you do this ? If not, am guessing there's an IFTTT recipe out there for this

    • I'm a Android Developer. What you've asked for is not possible especially on the latest Android versions due to the security reasons. Android does not expose APIs to control or change some network settings. As others have suggested try Tasker.

      • Well if that API is not exposed, tasker doesn't have any extra privileges that other apps don't have so it isn't going to work either.

  • I am/was in a similar boat. Whilst I considered leveraging the skills I already had, I decided to step completely out of my comfort zone and build a Sim Racing rig out of timber having never used tools since highs school. Took me around 40 hours total in my garage, cost me around $400 in tools/materials but it was extremely satisfying to build something from scratch with my hands. Won't make me any money, but it was great fun to make it with my kids & having a great time racing with it.

    • +2 votes

      Show us a pic. What tools did you use (Ozito)? What are you using as a seat?

    • great work!

      yeah that's the type of thing I'm looking for. Doesn't need to make money - learning is always valuable.

      • Yeah I love building stuff.

        Corporate strategist by day, but on weekends I’ve designed and built a bbq bench (including poured concrete top), built an outdoor table and bench seats, and just recently a floating deck and pergola in the backyard. Lots of YouTube and reading. I feel like if I was doing business cases and financial models in my spare time I’d have to shoot myself. So I try to learn to do things I otherwise wouldn’t know how to. Additionally they make my place look great too :)

        But if you enjoy software development, can’t hurt to do some personal projects too!

    • I have a Trakracer but was looking to build an 80 20 rig. So much work involved, I couldn't be bothered.

      Looks a lot better than the other DIY rigs I've seen. What did you base your design on?

    • Me too! Do u play Assetto Corsa?

      • Playing Project Cars 2 career mode so far. It is pretty unforgiving, I'll sweat out an entire race only to spin out on the final few corners trying to defend the lead. The AI is a bit strange like that, I can pull out a 3-4 second lead and in the final couple of laps they push up hard at you, not to say that isn't a real simulation but it makes for some stressful moments. Looking to move into iRacing once I feel I have a feel for sim racing, however doing my research it looks like costs can add up quick

  •  

    Respiration FFT monitor for IOS.

    • using existing sensors or some hardware?

      How would you envisage it would work? What do you want to use it for?

      •  

        Using microphone would be enough. Breathing rate would be part, but what would be more interesting is the signature of frequencies during breathing. Restricted breathing produces high frequencies/whistles from obstructions and constricted airways and also the increase in lung fluid produces low frequencies. There are general spectrum analyser demos around, but a tidy and accessible IOS version specific for this current situation would be useful, and being able to compare history or population data would be great.

        Many of the changes would be symptoms alongside fever/temperature, temperature being simpler to measure, but if you did manage to get respiration frequency data of the healthy population together with covid outcome, that would be seriously useful.

        • I'm not sure i'd be able to build something to test the idea in 3 weeks.

          What do you think this would be useful for? Would it be used for doctors? For the general public?

          What is the problem we are trying to solve?

          •  

            @witsa: If you have an Android phone, try one of the free/no ads spectrum analysers Audizr, Spectroid etc and breathe deeply. Amazing that no has capitalised yet in these pandemic times. There might be some shameless selling to government required to make money, but from the garbage modelling they currently pay for, this would actually be useful.

  • If I give you my idea, you develop it and get it up and running, will I get a cut?

    • i guess it depends. What would your contribution be?

      • +10 votes

        the idea would be the contribution?

        • +19 votes

          There are tons of ideas. Most of them are shit.

          The 30 hours is to validate the idea.

          For anything to be successful, it would take much more than 30 hours. There will likely be many revision and pivots to the idea.

          Someone financing the development for an MVP - sure that's a valuable contribution.

          You don't get a percentage for posting an idea on a public forum just because someone puts in the risk and hard work to implement it

            • @netjock: Lol you're putting way to much stock into an idea. Ideas on their own are worth jack. Every man and his dog has one. The difference between a doer is a dreamer is actually following up on it and seeing it through. How many ideas are actually being actioned? If i had a dollar for every "good idea" I'd be a millionaire. When you ask them about what they're doing about their idea, the excuses lol.

                • +22 votes

                  @netjock: Yeah sure dude. I've been developing software for a number of years. Can't tell you the number of times I've met a business/finance/IT grad guy with all the ideas. Just needs someone to build it for him. When asked how much he's willing to pay - always been met with the same attitude, "not much because I can get get some dev shop in india/china to build it in a week". Not a single one of those guys have built successful companies/startup.

                  I've also had a number of requests to work on apps where the owner spent $3k on fiverr to build their app in India. It only barely works. Undocumented, copy-paste code. They can't find a dev that will even touch it and now they're having to fork out more money to develop it from scratch locally.

                  You keep having your ideas dude. I don't usually wish failure on anybody but you sure as hell don't have the right attitude for success. When you inevitably find yourself, once again having to walk away from your failing startup, just remember that I told you so.

                  • @pqpein: LOL I don't go to Australian people and say I can get it done half as much offshore because it is two different things. Onshore people get hired for a price to do a certain job, don't hire them to do admin and complain how expensive it is.

                    Offshore resources are good for a purpose with limitations. If you can't manage offshore resources then don't offshore. Truth is most people don't.

                    Can't tell you the number of times I've met a business/finance/IT grad guy with all the ideas

                    Genuinely good ideas would get angel funding on a business plan. Unless you're a business angel or someone with some professional capital then you are somewhere down the list, because all the smart people before you have knocked it back.

                    There is a lot of ideas which sounds good but is there a market, even if there is can you scale and will it make you enough money to live on. How many people with a good idea don't end up running the company because they get pushed out by Angels and VCs simply because they don't know how to scale.

                    I love negs, it just means I'm not running with the crowd.

                    • @netjock: Ideas are cheap, execution is everything. Time and time again we've seen first-movers fall to better execution (MySpace -> FB, Skype -> Zoom, Ventrilo/Teamspeak -> Discord, list goes on…).

                      Early stage companies do not require angel/VC funding to succeed. Genuinely good ideas will have validated their product first with a prototype, like the OP is trying to do, before raising money for an idea based on assumptions (which will fail!). The biggest killer of early stage startups is not having product market fit, aka raising money before proving that the solution solves a problem.

                      I think it would be better if you quit your 6-figure corporate job at a bank, the antithesis to innovation that uses acquisitions for any meaningful change, to actually try building your own startup before trying to lecture others on how to run theirs. :)

                        • +11 votes

                          @netjock: Hold up - a drop shipping business is not a startup. I had no idea the bar was this low.

                          Once sold something on ebay. Launched in 10 minutes. First order 1 day after that. 100% margin. Profitable the day before.

                          Please don't waste your parent's money on a drop shipping business.

                          • @pqpein:

                            Hold up - a drop shipping business is not a startup. I had no idea the bar was this low.

                            Perfection 👌

                          • @pqpein: LoL you don't comprehend do you. Already making money so no outside funding.

                            eBay is you participating in someone else's business model no equity. Like you driving for Uber, 100% profit but no equity.

                            By your definition then Airwallex is not a startup because there is Transfewise, Western Union etc before that. Neither is Google as there was search engines before that.

                            Your problem is just because my suppliers hold the stock it is drop shipping. You think liner and join the dots. The unique product is in the detail. Like I am going to tell everyone on a public forum.

                            I never thought the bar to creativity dropped so low you have to go public to source ideas because you have none.

                        • +5 votes

                          @netjock: "If you want a six figure job try not to sound like taking 5 mins to deliver a 1 min point."

                          "I have my own start up. Read above. Launchedin 4 days. First order a week after that. 30% margins. Profitable from day one. Leveraged from suppliers who warehouse it all. We just acquire customers."

                          You could have simply said "I have a drop shipping business'. LOL

                          • @nub:

                            You could have simply said "I have a drop shipping business'.

                            Linear thinker. Plenty of people would have said about Google, just another search engine.

                            It really doesn't matter what you think. It doesn't matter what others write.

                            I am done with people who keep repeating the same thing: That for some reason I am special because I am a dev. I don't care about money, I just want to learn.

                            If you just wanted to learn Google an online tutorial. Read the whole thread. Half the suggestions have been done, quarter can't be done (due to not allowing root access). The quarter is you get nothing for even a good idea.

                        • @netjock: I can replicate your startup in 1 hour (EasyCompanies + Shopify = ASIC rego and internet store in <1 day).

                          You have no defensive moat in your business.

                          If I knew your product, I could find cheaper suppliers and undercut you and it would be a price war to the bottom. For someone who spouts 'business wisdom', your 'startup' is lacking serious defensibility.

                          Only by executing quickly and rapidly will you find out earlier that your idea is a 'pig of an idea'. My point is that the idea is not important, because it will most likely change - you need to arrive at this stage earlier rather than later by executing quickly.

                          P.S. I don't need a 6-figure corporate job like you, I'm just a developer that has actually spent the last 3 years building an Aussie startup that's now gone global & have raised money from investors both locally and abroad ;)

          • +2 votes

            @witsa: The sad thing here is that the OP was looking for development ideas for their spare time, but they are shutting down the one person (netjock) on this thread who's actually giving them the guidance that can help them.

            We've all met people with ideas that they haven't validated but it's just as common to meet a clueless dev that thinks they just need an idea in order to create a brilliant start-up.

            I'd invest more in a well thought through idea than I would on initial dev work. Prototyping is easy and shouldn't take 30 hours of dev.

            As others have said, if you have to ask for ideas then you're better off investing your time in some personal development. Developing soft skills that allow you to empathize more with others will get you closer to developing that brilliant app than asking for ideas on a forum.

            You're fortunate to have so much free time and in glad that you're using it to develop yourself. Good luck on your journey!

            • @thom: …and the OP downvoted your comment, and a couple above yours :\

            • +11 votes

              @thom: Are we reading the same thread? OP never once mentioned making money. He was looking for ideas for side projects to develop his skills.

              Big boy netjock here shows up puffing his chest to tell everyone he runs "finances and HR for Group IT at numerous global banks". You're not fooling anyone. Based on his post history and underdeveloped vocabulary, you can probably tell he's in his early to mid 20s and has read too many self-help and entrepreneurial books. This isn't your weekly startup founders meetup you don't have to bs us. Fake it till you make it doesn't apply here.

              Genuinely good ideas would get angel funding on a business plan.

              No investor will sign an nda to listen to your "good idea + business plan". Please don't confuse this with the money mum and dad will fork out for your newest startup.

              We've all met people with ideas that they haven't validated but it's just as common to meet a clueless dev that thinks they just need an idea in order to create a brilliant start-up.

              The difference between Joe from HR and the clueless dev is that only one of them has the ability to validate their idea for free. In that regard alone, the dev has an advantage. Easy enough to find a book that will teach you how to start a business. Finding someone to help develop your prototype without pay - almost impossible.

              Remember that most successful tech startups had technical founders not bankers. (eg. FB, MS, googlee, apple, atlassian, ebay, shopify, airbnb)

              • @pqpein: I found the poor spelling and grammar a dead giveaway as well.

              • -2 votes

                @pqpein: If a developer is trying to sharpen their dev skills, there are better ways to achieve this than asking for app ideas.

                OP's post was looking for an idea to develop to an MVP. If you think that only a dev is capable of validating a business idea then I'd strongly encourage you to go back to school.

                Many posts in this thread show a complete lack of understanding of what it actually takes to validate a business idea.

                Netjock's post actually had some real world examples, where people with more experience had already validated the problems that OP could be solving.

                I'd strongly encourage anyone reading this thread & down voting these comments to get some life experience. Focus on becoming more empathetic and avoid attacking others when your pride is hurt. Most of us were once young and arrogant as well, but the smart ones learnt to overcome weaknesses.

                • @thom: Please provide actual quotes from netjock where he was actually being helpful and encouraging? It's almost as if we're not reading the same comments.

                  If a developer is trying to sharpen their dev skills, there are better ways to achieve this than asking for app ideas.

                  I'm going to assume you're not a dev and even if you are, where do you get off telling another dev how they should sharpen their dev skills? It's like telling a writer that writing isn't the best way to develop their skills.

                  Bottom line is OP didn't come in here asking for your hot take on how to be featured in Entrepreneur magazine's top 35 under 35. So unless you have answers to his original question, maybe save the life advice for the kids.

                  • @pqpein:

                    Please provide actual quotes from netjock where he was actually being helpful and encouraging?

                    Scroll down mate!

                    Or a Google / Alexa app called "rate my idea" and then just listen to the logs of what everyone else talks into it.

                    Alternatively look at the free courses and do a short course on "innovation"

                    I'm going to assume you're not a dev and even if you are, where do you get off telling another dev how they should sharpen their dev skills?

                    Obviously you Devs don't need to do performance reviews at work and all just storm out when advice is given.

                    People who don't like advice being given shouldn't be asking for advice (like the OP). Take advice when you like it and giving people an ear full when you don't. Setup for an easy life.

                    I've told my Devs off for not documenting on paper and in their code. Because I know how to code, read code and know you should document blocks of code so people know what it is suppose to do. I didn't pay you to give me code that only you can read. Coding isn't even my day job.

                    Oh btw I like negs because you know bad news isn't ever well received.

                    • @netjock:

                      People who don't like advice being given shouldn't be asking for advice (like the OP). Take advice when you like it and giving people an ear full when you don't.

                      When did OP ask for your advice? Despite how much you talk yourself up, you have zero credibility to be giving out unsolicited advice.

                      You have absolutely no tact and no respect for other people's profession. You embody everything wrong with middle management. Since we're just throwing out unsolicited advice, maybe read "How To Win Friends and Influence People". That should help you understand why no one at work likes you and why you find it hard to keep friends.

                      I've told my Devs off for not documenting on paper and in their code. Because I know how to code, read code and know you should document blocks of code so people know what it is suppose to do. I didn't pay you to give me code that only you can read. Coding isn't even my day job.

                      No you probably don't know how to code. You think you can code because you can follow if statements and for loops. You've probably done a few "Hello worlds" and dipped your toes in some python. Heck, you're probably a wiz at writing macros in excel. But please don't confuse this with knowing actual programming paradigms and software patterns.

                      You make it clear just how clueless you actually are when you think "documented" code means commenting every block of code. Most best practices discourage comments in favour of clear, readable and testable code. No one is going to comment every block of code so Joe from HR can understand it.

                      • @pqpein: LoL post a question in public expect undesirable answers. Don't expect everyone to come with sugar pills.

                        About documenting code. You are not very good at customer service are you? You talk the same to your colleagues as to the customer and expect them to understand coder rules? Explains why you made be so mad at people and your job. Just because you think you are great doesn't make everyone else is stupid.

                        As for your book advice. If you need to read that book after 17 years of education then something is broke or are you just quoting a book you never read yourself. It sure sounds like it.

                  • @pqpein:

                    Please provide actual quotes from netjock where he was actually being helpful and encouraging? It's almost as if we're not reading the same comments.

                    OP is a dev looking to develop their skills and is asking for ideas that they can develop into an MVP. Someone asked the question about what value they would give to an idea - probably to understand how much OP knew about business and developing an MVP. OP's response indicated that they had many opportunities for growth outside of dev.
                    Here are some examples where I found netjock's comments helpful to the OP.
                    1) They provided a quick reality check on developing an MVP.
                    "Free idea, zero pay off and your contribution is 30 hours over 4 weeks? I can pay someone offshore $15 an hour and keep all the IP and get it done in one week.
                    Lucky you're a developer who probably half decent at taking instructions because you're not a very good business person."
                    Understanding your value in the process is incredibly important. Dev work is one of the last things you should be doing in the process. Global labor arbitrage in software dev isn't a new concept. Clearly the OP (& downvoters) would benefit from some lessons in business.

                    2) Given that OP didn't understand the value of work outside of dev, it's unlikely that they would be successful in pivoting on someone else's business idea.
                    "You can't come up with an idea but you can revise someone else's and pivot on it. You learn from manufacturers of China how to copy products?"

                    3) Anyone who has pitched for investment before will know that well thought through ideas are more valuable than dev work. Netjock is recommending that OP spend more time understanding more about business.
                    "Genuine good ideas can get money from Angel investors on the basis of an idea plus a sound business plan and you still get to keep some equity.

                    If you want a good business plan you get a business consultant not a developer."

                    4) Whatever skills you have and value you contribute, don't forget that you are replaceable.
                    "Offshore resources are good for a purpose with limitations. "
                    Offshore resources aren't the only threat to dev work. Automation will become a greater threat in years to come.

                    5) Having the right attitude will take you further than knowing a bit more than your colleagues/peers.
                    "Obviously you Devs don't need to do performance reviews at work and all just storm out when advice is given."
                    The hot-headed responses & attacks on netjock in this thread emphasize this point. Don't be afraid to learn from the person who has hurt your pride. They are probably giving you the advice that you need to hear.

                    6) The comment from Sane has 2 perfect areas for OP to develop in.
                    "OP isn't looking for ideas that will make them better."
                    OP's responses give the impression they are focused more on the dev and less on developing an MVP. If they want a scenario where people have already clearly defined the problems to be solved then there are many better ways to achieve this like I previously suggested.

                    7) Look at existing business problems that people with more experience than you have already identified.
                    "If you are not after making money then go to a non for profit or a charity and volunteer your time. Go around the organisation and ask what are people's pain points and see how you can help."

                    8) If you don't understand the various roles that contribute to developing an MVP, do a short course on innovation. It may even help with idea generation.
                    "Alternatively look at the free courses and do a short course on "innovation"".

                    I'm going to assume you're not a dev and even if you are, where do you get off telling another dev how they should sharpen their dev skills? It's like telling a writer that writing isn't the best way to develop their skills.

                    I like helping people :) If you want to improve in something, don't do it in isolation without a feedback mechanism. Chances are many people have solved your problem before and you could learn from their insight. For software dev the open source community is the perfect place to learn from others.
                    Also be careful making assumptions with no way to validate them. Do you really think that doing dev work is unique to you? Women in typing pools got re-skilled to be developers before most people on this forum were born. Chances are people in management positions of your organisation cut their teeth coding on mainframes in languages that you may not have heard of. The same applies to hardware.
                    Ask yourself "why would I be writing such a detailed response to help out a dev if I didn't have experience in that area myself?". Maybe I was once a dev, but I've gained enough skills to move well beyond there. Maybe I've grown tired of seeing young devs who think they just need an app idea to develop the next brilliant start-up. Maybe I have nothing to prove to someone on a message board..

                    So unless you have answers to his original question, maybe save the life advice for the kids.

                    OP's original post was looking for areas to develop their skills in. I think I've provided enough insight into the areas they could best use their spare time. Hopefully you've benefited from the discussion as well.

                    • @thom: I feel your good intentions but it is the nature of the internet.

                      Do you feel like there is a tag team of experts who shoot you down but none them have volunteered to help OP out?

                      It is NOT okay to give OP a reality check but it is OK to tell those people they are wrong because they have achieved so much but NONE of them have volunteered their time to help the OP.

                      Keeping their success to themselves. Apparently they are doing developers a service by attacking non developers but not helping other developers out.

                      • @netjock: The internet will always be full of people who have a chip on their shoulder and need to vent..

                        It's disappointing that the OP started a thread about developing their skills but was quick to dismiss the first person who exposed an area that they could develop in.

                        People aren't always grateful for the the answer to the problem that's been holding them back.

                    • +1 vote

                      @thom: tldr

              • @pqpein:

                In that regard alone, the dev has an advantage. Easy enough to find a book that will teach you how to start a business.

                LOL

                Read a book and be your own accountant, lawyer, plumber, electrician mechanic. What could go wrong.

            • @thom: The prototyping isn't to show off to investors. It's to test the product in the market and get early traction, to which the results are shown to investors.

              Which would you rather - invest in someone who's selling snake oil with an idea and business plan, or a founder that's actually talked to their target market & has early paying customers on a 30-hour prototype? 🤷‍♀️

              • @AfterDeals:

                The prototyping isn't to show off to investors. It's to test the product in the market and get early traction, to which the results are shown to investors.

                If you need to do dev work to prototype your idea, then you are doing prototyping wrong.

                Which would you rather - invest in someone who's selling snake oil with an idea and business plan, or a founder that's actually talked to their target market & has early paying customers on a 30-hour prototype? 🤷‍♀️

                As an investor, I'd rather put money into a well thought through business plan, which involves testing the target market. This is completely different to someone selling snake oil.

                If someone is spending 30 hours of development before even validating the business idea, I'd view them as a risk that needs some management overhead so they don't waste my money writing code for problems that don't need solving.

                • @thom:

                  If you need to do dev work to prototype your idea, then you are doing prototyping wrong. As an investor, I'd rather put money into a well thought through business plan, which involves testing the target market. This is completely different to someone selling snake oil.

                  What a ridiculous blanket statement that has no basis. Just curious… how many companies have you invested in? Or on the contrary - how many businesses have you built and raised money from serious investors (not friends/family/fools) without a dev prototype?

                  From a business plan - I have no view into a founder's ability to execute, let alone early results that speak volume about whether a solution solves a problem.

                  If someone is spending 30 hours of development before even validating the business idea, I'd view them as a risk that needs some management overhead so they don't waste my money writing code for problems that don't need solving.

                  If a founder can not even invest 30 hours - equivalent to less than one week worth of work - into prototyping an idea - how will they have the persistence to actually go out and build the business.

                  • @AfterDeals:

                    What a ridiculous blanket statement that has no basis.

                    Your confusion could be due to a misunderstanding of terminology. Prototyping is a different process to developing a functional software prototype. It's a low-fi activity that should always take place to validate assumptions about your idea.

                    Just curious… how many companies have you invested in? Or on the contrary - how many businesses have you built and raised money from serious investors (not friends/family/fools) without a dev prototype?

                    Timing is everything and eventually you'll find yourself in a situation where you need to pitch a concept that you haven't had time to fully validate or build into a working prototype (if you haven't already).

                    I'm not suggesting to avoid doing dev work - I'm just stating that there's a lot of work that happens before this and a lot of devs are clueless to this.

                    If a founder can not even invest 30 hours - equivalent to less than one week worth of work - into prototyping an idea - how will they have the persistence to actually go out and build the business.

                    You're misunderstanding the prototyping that takes place to test assumptions and the working prototype that the dev gets involved in later.

                    This whole discussion came about because the OP was placing more value on dev work compared to the work that may have gone into validating an initial idea.

      • What would your contribution be

        The idea, which you didn't have before.

      • Nice try buddy!

  • An app that shows to the receiver if I call someone on my contacts list, but hides it for other numbers I call. Swapping over is a pain.

    • Disable Call ID.

      Add *31# in front of all the phone numbers in your contact list.

      • Legend, thought there would be an easy way to do it.

        • doesn't that just enable or disable the Call ID at the start of the call?
          Wouldn't you need to reset the configuration at the end of the call?

          • @witsa: You don't disable caller ID using that prefix. You disable it in your phone settings so your phone doesn't send your number.

            The *31# prefix added to the numbers on the contacts list then enables caller ID for that call, over riding the system setting.

            So if you call someone without using their saved number then the ID is suppressed.

  • An app that actively notifies me when it's about to rain in my area. Sometimes the weather forecast says no or low chance of rain, so I do the washing, and if I'm not keeping an eye out it rains before I can get the washing in. If it could somehow get info from the rain radars and alert as rain is moving towards different areas, that would be great - perhaps a little complex - I know nothing about software development.

    • it's actually not a bad idea. And there's tons of free weather APIs out there to get this data.

      So maybe you can either set your address or it uses your location and if the data says it'll rain within the next few hours, it'll alert you.

      I think google assistant sort of does something similar in that it'll tell you the weather for the day in terms of a notification.

      • Yeah there’s stuff that will tell you the weather forecast, but as far as I know not incoming rain real-time based on the radar or very up to date weather.

        People love following the weather too, so if you could make it work well I’m sure it’d be popular. Great for people’s commute home (not that we do that much anymore) etc. Brisbane council has a text message warning system for severe weather, but I suspect that’s manual and doesn’t do anything for just normal rain.

      • I think I've looked into this more accurate and local weather app idea before and what I found is that most of weather broadcasters simply don't know what's the weather exactly going to be like in your local area. They update the weather data every hour or so and that's why usually you'll see it rain first then your app tells you it's raining. I also interviewed at a popular weather app company recently and found their weather app quite lacklustre. But their app has millions of downloads and 4+ star ratings so what do I know.

      • There is an app that already does what you and Morse have mentioned - it is called Dark Sky. Sadly, it was only ever made available in the US, and Google bought the Android version recently.

        An Australian-localised version might net you some dosh if you can find a way around IP issues.