• out of stock

Seagate IronWolf NAS 8 TB $299 + Delivery @ Shopping Express

560

This seems like a decent price for the drive given current market conditions, it works out to be $0.037/GB.

There is a limit of one per order.

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Comments

  • Damn I just bought two of these @ ~$350 from Amazon US.

    Actually no wait, these are the older model. I'm happy with my purchase still.

  • You can only order maximum of 1 Seagate IronWolf 8TB 7200 RPM 3.5" SATA NAS Internal Hard Drive (ST8000VN004)

    • I guess who needs RAID anyway!

      • I don't understand why sellers limit quantities. You would think they want to sell as many as they can and it's probably cheaper to send to the same address.

        • Shrug. Maybe they are trying to maximise number of customers who buy from them, and they're hoping people will buy a second one at a non discounted price?

        • They're probably selling close to or at cost price to entice buyers. Limiting it to one per customer would increase the odds of them getting new customers and thus a larger confirmed mailing list.

          • @Trance N Dance: I've never bought from them and with the limit I don't think I will. It makes sense if the item is only expected to be used individually, for example an iPad. It doesn't make sense in the context of high capacity HDD where a common application is in RAID setup for NAS and you need 2.

            • @TheAccountant: I agree - although there have been others on here who have bought only one HDD in the past and tried to hedge their pricing by waiting for the second/next drive… makes me think something like Synology Hybrid Raid is a good idea!

            • @TheAccountant: There are plenty of reasons as to why some would only buy one drive.
              The sale entices you to buy another drive so you have a drive at the ready for a rebuild if needed, rather than wait for a failure then buy one.
              Sale is cheap enough to entice you to move to double redundancy so your RAID or pool only fails when two drives die.
              Expanding a storage pool.
              Some consider it good practice to never buy all the drives for the pool in one go at the one retailer, so you can diversify the batches and possibly failure rate. Even if you decide to build your pool from all X brand drives, you buy them all from different retailers so hopefully the batches the individual drives come from are different so if there's a bad batch not all of your drives die at once or within short time of one another.

    • Just place separate orders with 1 in each order.
      I did place two orders and on both onboard for delivery today.

  • Woot thank you. Bought one at $350 before lockdown these have been over 400 for months

  • I've had 2 of these (ST8000VN004) die recently at < 8 months old with Reallocated Sectors.

    The warranty claim process take weeks to ship the drive to Sydney, wait for Seagate to confirm the fault them ship the replacement drive from Ho Chi Minh City Vietnam.

    I've been in the Seagate camp for a lot of years but my bad run on these drives means my next drives will be WD Reds.

    • I say this being about as far from a Seagate advocate as you can get having being burnt over the last decade during their dismal period. I have 2 8TB ironwolfs at the moment in a Synology NAS, 1 had for the past year gradually building up bad/reallocated sectors to the point i was getting new ones regularly. I submitted a warranty claim and include screenshots and printouts of the Synology NAS warnings for the drive. I used Sendle, not auspost, so a courier picked it up. I can't remember exactly but i definitely got a replacement drive well within 2 weeks. This was in Feb. I would hazard a guess the fact i used Sendle, and attached as much evidence as i could, sped up the process.

      EDIT: I have the older st8000vn0022's at the moment… now making me think whether i want the newer version.

    • WD drives are terrible. They use shingled magnetic recording which is totally inappropriate for NAS disks. It means the disk is incredibly slow and if you mix with a CMR drive there's a high likelihood the NAS will declare it a failed drive and remove it from the array.

      • That's incorrect. My five bay is filled with WD Red's 4TB drives and none of them are SMR

        • No, it's very correct. WD is actually being sued for selling SMR drives as NAS drives and not declaring it in the specification sheet.

          In fact according to WD, if you have 4TB WD Red drives, they're all SMR.

          • @Kyanar: Its not that simple - they were selling some NAS drives which were SMR and not advertised as such. They were also selling CMR drives at the same capacity. So its not correct to imply they are all SMR.

            Anyway all of the manufacturers have agreed to identify the recording technology properly now.

            If you want full technical details check here: https://youtu.be/aztTf2gI55k

            • @gadgetguy: You have to explicitly buy a just announced "WD Red Plus" or "WD Red Pro" drive if you want a CMR NAS drive from WD, at higher cost.

              And again, WD has explicitly stated if you have a 4TB WD Red drive, it is SMR.

              https://blog.westerndigital.com/wd-red-nas-drives/

              Only drives lower than 1TB or 8TB or greater are CMR. There is no capacity overlap - either a capacity is CMR or it is SMR.

              • @Kyanar: "And again, WD has explicitly stated if you have a 4TB WD Red drive, it is SMR."

                NOW they are because they have NOW rebranded non-SMR as Red Plus, as a result of the issue being publicised.

                Again, its wrong to state or imply that anyone with a 4TB Red has an SMR drive i.e. purchased or manufactured BEFORE they were re-branded/relabelled.

                Merqajaan above has confirmed this.

                Linus (in the video I linked too) has a table of the specific model numbers and recording technologies used He also explains how CMR and SMR work and exactly why SMR is bad for NAS, FreeNAS and ZFS in particular.

                • @gadgetguy: No, it's still absolutely correct to make that statement because Western Digital says that's exactly the case, because they did not have any CMR drives available in 4TB varieties - UNLESS you bought a obsoleted disk, because only previous generations were CMR. Right now, if you buy a WD Red disk, it's SMR unless you literally buy one which says "OLD VERSION" (with a model number ending EFRX) which noone is going to do because it's end of sale.

                  Western Digital, who make the drive, make that pretty clear in their table of CMR/SMR mappings that don't even include WD Red Plus because it didn't exist when they posted the table in April - WD Red Plus was announced in June.

                  I'm going to take the word of the company that made the drive over some random Youtube videos.

                  • @Kyanar: I give up. I'll let you continue spreading misinformation.

                    "I'm going to take the word of the company that made the drive over some random Youtube videos."

                    It's a screenshot of Western Digital's page. D'oh.

                    • @gadgetguy: The only misinformation is yours.

                      It's a screenshot of Western Digital's page. D'oh

                      I literally… LITERALLY… gave you a link, directly to Western Digital, on their own website at westerndigital.com, that says you are wrong. And you persist in calling it misinformation because you saw "a screenshot" in a Youtube video. Still taking the manufacturer's word, sourced above, over your rubbish.

                      • @Kyanar: He's not wrong if you take a look at how that page looked prior to June. You could buy WD Red in several capacities that were infact CMR. What WD have done is take the existing CMR drives that were known as WD Red and rebranded them as WD Red Plus, while keeping the same model numbers.

                        For example WD40EFRX has been sold under the WD Red brand for years and now the exact same model is being sold as WD Red Plus.

    • I'd stay away from WD Red SMR drives on a NAS :|

    • My warranty experience was amazing. Had a 5TB drive die on me. Sent to Sydney which ended up being forwarded to Singapore to test and confirm the fault. Recieved my replacement drive a few days later. I think the total turn around time was just over a week. I fully expected it to take weeks given the need to ship it overseas but I found the process very smooth. Obviously not everyone will have the same experience you had.

    • Did they have reallocated sectors and then die, or do you consider a drive with reallocated sectors to be dead? I've had Seagate drives in raid arrays that had to reallocate a bunch of sectors early on, but then kept working for years (some are still working) with no further bad sectors. Modern drives have a heap of spare sectors, so unless you see your bad sector continually increasing (over a period of months), I wouldn't worry too much.

      • My drives started with low reallocated sector counts which increased over a short period of time, at which point I started the RMA's. Confirmed in both cases by Seagate testing to be drive faults.

        I know my original post above has been negged pretty hard but I'm not anti-Seagate. I have 4 other Seagate drives in the same file server, with the oldest nearly 6 years old (one of the early Seagate NAS drives).

        I've probably been unlucky with this drive to get 2 out of 2 bad ones. Was just sharing my experience.

        • You were probably negged for complaining about how long it took to get a replacement from Vietnam. You're only allowed to complain about anglo nations.

          • @dcash: You jest, but stranger negs happen. Same thing for me though as soon as my re-allocated sectors ramped up getting more every week i did the RMA. Drive was still working otherwise.

    • I received my 2nd warranty replacement ST8000VN004 drive today (almost 4 weeks after starting the RMA process).

      I'm 5 minutes into a full disk scan … and the new drive pauses scanning every minute or so to make a wonderful grinding noise, and so far I'm at 65193 seek errors. I'm fairly convinced that Seagate Ironwolf 8TB drives just hate me.

      https://imgur.com/a/RPM9vsn

      I just checked my stats, and I've got a Seagate NAS ST4000VN000 which has been running in the same server 24/7 for 6 years, 5 days and 20 hours and it's current seek error rate is "< 0.01% (7/15987748)".

  • I still can't see the difference between this and barracuda pro. Apart from marketing target

    • One thing is that some Barracuda drives are SMR, meaning they're not good for NAS uses. No IronWolf drive uses SMR technology. IronWolf drives also have a vibration sensor, and run colder (necessary since they'll be running in enclosures up to eight drives) and have been tested for a higher workload and have a calculated MTBF (Mean Time Before Failure). For a NAS, you should probably buy a NAS rated disk.

  • Thanks OP.

  • The order limit of 1 is kind of silly if you're building a NAS.

    • There are plenty of reasons to buy just 1 drive for a NAS.
      If you're expanding a current NAS, you might only need 1 drive.
      The sale entices you to buy another drive so you have a drive at the ready for a rebuild if needed, rather than wait for a failure then buy one.
      Sale is cheap enough to entice you to move to double redundancy so your RAID or pool only fails when two drives die.
      Some consider it good practice to never buy all the drives for the pool in one go at the one retailer, so you can diversify the batches and possibly failure rate. Even if you decide to build your pool from all X brand drives, you buy them all from different retailers so hopefully the batches the individual drives come from are different so if there's a bad batch not all of your drives die at once or within short time of one another.

  • wow bargain..!!!!

  • Thanks been waiting for this to go on sale to extend my nas. I have a few 4tb ironwolf drives that have been rock solid for 3 years now.

  • Sub Total $299.00
    Aus Post or Couriers $10.53
    GST Inc. $28.42
    Shopping Cart Total $312.63

    1% surcharge, not advertised anywhere until the final checkout. Dodgy.

    Good overall price though. Purchased.

  • Was looking to buy a couple of drives. How does the 6tb reds compare other than capacity? $239 seems alright.
    https://www.shoppingexpress.com.au/buy/wd-red-6tb-5400-rpm-3...

  • Would the Seagate Exos Enterprise 10TB for $414 delivered and a 5 year waranty be better via Amazon if your a prime member?. Thoughts apprecitaed!

  • Just for those who are looking for 10TB models, or wanting to build a RAID, the 10TB Ironwolf NAS drives are selling for $399, with a maximum ordering quantity of 8. The model is ST10000VN0008. The offer ends the same time as this 8TB deal.

    https://www.shoppingexpress.com.au/buy/seagate-ironwolf-10tb...

    I just bought 2 for myself. As blamesociety mentioned, there is a 1% surcharge when I paid using Paypal. Price including delivery to Perth comes out to $819.73 for 2 drives.

  • I just ordered 2. In two separate orders meaning twice the shipping ($10 ish) on each of them but you can use the same account and PayPal.

  • Just placed an order for a single drive. Not the absolute "best" deal. Back in Dec 2019, I bought 4 @280 bucks each - shipped, no extra charge with Paypal . So, a difference of 32 dollars per drive. Should I go for another drive? Got one more bay to fill in my NAS. Looking a the price trend for Ironwolf NAS drive atm, doesn't seem likely, hadn't gone under 300 bucks (including all the extra charges) for this year so far.

  • Cheers OP, bought 1

  • out of stock while I had 1 in my cart :(