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Tesla Model 3 Standard Range Plus $64,425 Delivered + On Road Costs (Was $68,425 + On Road Costs) @ Tesla

9471

Substantial price drop for Tesla Model 3's. Enjoy!

Standard Range Plus $62,900 (was $66,900)
Long Range $77,900 (was $81,900)
Performance $89,900 (was $93,900)

All prices listed above exclude on-road costs (vary per state), Tesla's mandatory $150 order fee and $1375 delivery fee.

Through the Tesla Corporate Program, delivery fee is waived (save $1375).


In comparison to other luxury sedans, Tesla offers excellent value

BMW 330i - $77,900
BMW M340i xDrive - $111,900
BMW M3 - $144,900

Mercedes C 300 sedan - $75,300
Mercedes C 43 sedan - $113,700
Mercedes C 63 S sedan - $168,300

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closed Comments

                    • +2 votes

                      @urahara:

                      Its funny that we export all the raw materials for batteries but don't have a single major battery manufacturer in Australia.

                      As it always has been. Nothing's changed… we dig up dirt and sell it - and then eventually buy it back once it's processed.

            •  

              @urahara: Did you buy one?

          •  

            @Zackeroo: Yea, great car but personally can’t do it with the lack of manual and sound. But with the new electric Jeep having an actual manual, there’s hope yet!

            • +1 vote

              @Mortal Krumpet: A new electric Jeep will have a manual transmission?

            • +2 votes

              @Mortal Krumpet: Damn, that's weird to think about. The advantage of electric motors in speed is the lack of gears, therefore the elimination of shift time.

              Manual would disregard that, so I personally don't see the point of manual on an electric motor.

              However, there probably is some logical reason why they would do that, so I'm excited to see what they have planned out

              • +1 vote

                @Zackeroo: Well there’s a few things to note on that I guess.. Similar to the original combustion cars, adding gears allows them to put smaller /lower rpm motors for similar output by gearing down / up depending on their output capability. Especially more useful with an off-roader where speed is less of an issue. That said, I think it’s still pretty fast anyway, in the 6 second range (faster than most off-roaders or at least the normal jeep anyway).

                But the main point, is that for people who like to choose a gear and enjoy the feeling of driving a manual (like myself) it’s definitely a big selling point.

                Lastly, according to the write-up, it has the benefit of the instant torque on max throttle input, but otherwise a synthetic ‘traditional’ torque curve is used to simulate the ICE feeling.

                •  

                  @Mortal Krumpet: That's true, but it really depends on how well they implement that. If they end up causing long shift time, and pretty much just throw in the equivalent to a combustion engine's gearbox, it's going to become quite ordinary…

                  •  

                    @Zackeroo: True, but you could say that about any ICE car too. A good manual gearbox is the difference between fun and none =)

                    •  

                      @Mortal Krumpet: True, but having no gearbox at all should technically always be better than having one.

                      Bad Gearbox < Good Gearbox < No Gearbox

                      •  

                        @Zackeroo: Each to there own of course, but it all depends on how you define "better". If A-B or pure fastest is your goal, you're probably right. But I drive because I enjoy it, and the involvement of the manual is 90 percent of the enjoyment for me (and I'm sure many others).

                        •  

                          @Mortal Krumpet: Yea fair enough. When it comes to electric cars, people usually buy for two reasons. The instantaneous speed, or the fact that it's a lot cheaper to own when discussing fuel costs (More common for cheaper electric cars)

        •  

          Tbh honest most modern luxury cars have almost silent engines, the biggest noise in any new car is the tyres/road noise.

      • +3 votes

        Which one do you have? I tested drive a Model S P100D and it was freaking insane. Also used auto pilot and that was scary af. And the tesla rep took over to show me ludicrous mode which is an experience in itself.

        • +2 votes

          I need a car which has ludicrous mode. Care to share your experience?

          •  

            @Alan Laz: It goes from suck to blow with one flick of the switch.

        •  

          Model 3 Long Range. I'd love to get the S, but $88k for a car was pushing it already for me.

      • +1 vote

        i drove one is US couple of years ago , liked instant torque and technology built into the car however really annoyed with wind noise at motorway speeds

        also Model 3 infotainment setup looks really weird most like after thought , have a big monitor sticking out of dash which i really hated

        lot of people think electric cars does not need any service , its not true you do need service it every 2 years and it costs a lot than a normal petrol car, tesla charges and hand leg just change coolant, break fluid and air filters

        • +13 votes

          Bollocks. Tesla parts are cheap compared to many premium cars.

          You can go four years on the fluids, do the filters yourself or buy them online

          • +4 votes

            @SamR: Yeah from my perspective model 3 is not a premium car , compare cost of service plans for first 5yrs on all cars in about list telsa is almost same or more costlier to service

            I am just trying to raise a point that lot of people think electric have 0 maintenance which not 100% true

            Also there are lot of YouTube channels on how Tesla's quotes are super expensive if you have a crash and stuff how they disable cars from charging network if you decide to service your own car

            • -4 votes

              @BK12: And we all forget the insurance premium on Tesla cars.. Its 4-5 time higher than BMW and Merc.. In the end BMW and Merc are cheaper to run on a yearly basis.

              • +5 votes

                @ashinoz: Not true, in WA insurance with RAC is cheaper with their 25% EV discount

            • +4 votes

              @BK12: This has got to be the most ignorant comments I read all day.

              • +3 votes

                @neostarsx: whats ignorant in there , i am just trying to state the facts , i am not against electric cars , but i am just stating that lot of people think you dont need service them at all

        • +12 votes

          Once you remove ICE engine noise, other noises do become more evident. I do notice tyre noise (nothing abnormal though) even when Tesla are taking the edge off with OEM tyres with an acoustic foam lining. I've a model X but believe it's true of the 3 as well.
          I'd disagree with the service commentary. I take my car in for peace of mind ~annually even when I don't need to (no real warranty concerns). It usually falls between $250 and $380 (wiper blades/fluids/filters/fob batteries..) - all booked/scheduled via the app.
          As @SamR mentioned, you could do much of that yourself and for a fraction of the cost.
          I haven't checked but I'm almost certain that my VW Golf of similar age cost far more to service over the same period - and so it should.
          Regarding accident costs, thankfully insurance takes care of the more serious incidents. I think it's reasonable to imagine that Tesla are not keen for uncertified and potentially damaged battery packs to be plugged into the high voltage supercharger network. It's more of an edge case to want to service lower-level electric motors/battery packs etc.
          Unless I'm forced into some role where I'd need to cover major distance daily, I won't buy another ICE. I avoided test driving knowing that I might be bitten by the electric car bug but my wife ultimately booked one as a surprise. Game Over.

          • +1 vote

            @Wozzer: Thanks for the info from an actual owner's perspective.

            Yes, a Golf costs more than that on annual servicing, even at an independent mechanic.

            Do you have to take the car to Tesla yourself, or do they come pick it up for you?

            Starting to think I should bite the bullet and book myself a surprise test drive haha

            • +2 votes

              @andresampras: You take car in, they give you an Uber voucher for $30 each way to get home and then back to pickup the car.

      •  

        I test drove one in December. Totally agree. Magnificent technology. I await the Powerball win and I’m away

      •  

        Yeah, I drove a 3P, really amazing. Now considering a YP when they get here.

    • +6 votes

      Don’t drive one as you will then think ICE cars are crap.

      Unrelenting and instant acceleration. Addictive.

      •  

        Nah, as mentioned above it’s great - BUT - I miss the sound and the manual transmission. It’s the driving experience that I need and why I prefer to drive my standard.

        Edit - there’s a manual Jeep now / in the works, so there’s hope for a great experience in the future if others do the same.

    • +1 vote

      I mean, ascetically a Tesla would be complete sacrilege

    • +1 vote

      Are the side windows stone proof?

      •  

        It's got Sentry. So will photograph any stoned people who come by.

  • +19 votes

    Can't find any tesla vouchers for additional 5% off. No buy

  • +4 votes

    Any discount on Tesla Gift Cards?

    • +34 votes

      33% of $334 means extra $110

      • +2 votes

        My bad.

      • +1 vote

        Long range and Luxury Car Tax.

      • +3 votes

        LR = Long Range model
        LCT = Luxury Car Tax

      • +5 votes

        Something protecting an extinct industry.

    • +4 votes

      You don’t pay LCT on the entire amount, just whatever is over the threshold. As another poster said $110 extra. No biggie.

      • +3 votes

        Wait till he learns about how marginal tax rates works as well lol

    • +2 votes

      Just in case people are wondering/confused, luxury car tax only applies to the amount over the threshold.

  • +4 votes

    Thanks i will wait for a Segway deal instead.

    •  

      Aren't they discontinued? I think you'll find prices will skyrocket…

  • +96 votes

    Nice to see electric car prices slowly come down, although we really do need our ass backwards government do more to encourage adoption. Seems like its too much of an ask for Scotty from marketing, who lets not forget, brought a lump of coal to parliament house show and tell.

    Does anyone know how much on road costs typically end up being for a model 3?

    • +5 votes

      Their configurator provides you with the drive away pricing. It differs from state to state.

    • +8 votes

      Looks like we might end up paying more if the electric car tax gets nationalised.

      • +2 votes

        Why on earth is this a thing?

        • +9 votes

          Gotta pay for roads somehow unfortunately
          (currently being paid for by fuel levies).

          •  

            @Drakesy: I'm not sure if this is still true but I thought this was only being tried in my state of VIC? Not sure what Dan Andrews was thinking or if Victorian Labor was behind this decision.

            • +5 votes

              @Deseret: Yeah, it's not the most progressive stance.
              I believe their logic is implement a really small levy now before the electric car industry lobby gets too big/rich to be able to block it then work up from there.

              Kind of forward thinking, kind of shooting themselves in the foot on uptake.

              •  

                @Drakesy: This is exactly it, they wanted to get in early while the number of EVs on the road is relatively small. You can be 100% sure that every state is going to have to introduce something like this eventually as otherwise the fuel excise is just going to dry up and they'll be left with nothing.

                Rather than stinging people with it later, Vic are electing to make this cost known upfront.

              •  

                @Drakesy: Fuel excise is levied by the federal government. I think Victoria and SA's rush to EV tax are also about staking a claim on the revenue before the federal government implements an EV tax.

                implement a really small levy now

                Victoria's EV tax sounded really small to me before I worked out that it's equivalent to the fuel excise on a vehicle that uses 5.85 litres/100 km. In practical terms EV tax is smaller than excise for the vast majority of vehicles on the road, but not when compered to the most fuel efficient hybrid vehicles.

            •  

              @Deseret: S.A. as well.

          •  

            @Drakesy: currently being partially paid for by fuel levies

          •  

            @Drakesy: What about boat trailers and jet ski

      • +1 vote

        Once they ban ICE everyone is forced onto EV then the politicians will start another tax regime that sounds like it makes sense but for most people it won't.

        But don't worry we haven't been spending money on alternatives (trains, buses etc) therefore everyone is going to get stuck with higher costs.

        Notice how income tax bracket creep, increase house values (which basically means anyone with an IP is basically caught by land tax). The politicians have us where they want us. Taxes in front and taxes behind us, caught in the middle.

        •  

          Tax sandwich. Worse than any other sandwiches. I can think of far better types of sandwiches…. ;)

      •  
    • +15 votes

      Why exactly should our government subsidise the cost of overseas manufacturers? A $10,000 credit would be sent directly overseas as profit.

      Other options like increasing fuel tax or installing charging stations could have more impact.

      From a social equity perspective, discounting Teslas would be a discount for the rich. It would be better to convert buses to electric / hydrogen and subsidise public transport.

      • +9 votes

        That's not quite how subsidies work. They don't go straight into the pockets of suppliers nor do they entirely go to the consumers. If you look at a supply and demand graph, you'll see that the rightward shift of the supply curve (as a representation of subsidisation) will definitely change the equilibrium point but the change in consumer surplus or producer surplus (profit) will depend on the elasticity of demand. In most cases, you'll see that both consumer and producer surpluses are increased, meaning that subsidy has gone both to the consumer and supplier.

      • +7 votes

        Rather than subsidies i think that it would be beneficial to slowly bring in a ICE tax for every vehicle that doesn't rely on electricity.

        Such as 2% Every year after 2025 on top of the car's value if you'd like to buy a standard engine car (by then electric cars should be well into parity). This will force manufacturers to bring in electric vehicles rather than using Australia as a dumping ground for previous generation tech/cars. The public still get to buy their ICE vehicles, they'll just need to pay a bit more for them.

        Subsidies never have, and will never work.

        •  

          Except that all the other G7 countries have introduced subsidies for EV's except Australia and its because they do work and are one of the levers to pull to decarbonise the transport sector as quickly as possible.

          • +1 vote

            @realrift: Be it childcare subsidies or homebuilder subsidies, history has shown that government subsidies generally do nothing for the consumer and everything for the seller/manufacturer/provider who absorb the costs, bumping up the prices.

            It puts more money in the hands of people wanting the same good who the providers are only too happy to take off their hands. Similar way that allowing people to pillage their super to buy houses would bump up house costs overnight.

            If anything it'll just mean that EV manufacturers won't have to reduce their prices for a longer period of time.

            •  

              @Drakesy: How is the solar subsidy scheme going?

              •  

                @realrift: Yeah
                Thats probably the one success they've had

            •  

              @Drakesy:

              Be it childcare subsidies or homebuilder subsidies, history has shown that government subsidies generally do nothing for the consumer and everything for the seller/manufacturer/provider who absorb the costs, bumping up the prices.

              Yes. Home builder grants just offset the cost increases which maybe artificial but who knows link

              Quote: Ms Marquardt said "The fall in new dwelling prices was due to the impact of the Federal Government's HomeBuilder grant and similar grants by the Western Australian and Tasmanian state governments. Without the offset from these grants, the price of new dwellings would have risen, reflecting increases in materials and labour prices in response to strong demand".

      • +4 votes

        Pretty much like the HomeMaker grant which basically going to Ford (Ranger), Toyota (HiLux) and kitchen appliance makers.

        Truth is EV subsidies is good headlines and for those who are rich enough to afford it.

        What would be more important is improving fuel efficiency of the fleet. Because there is more SUVs and Utes on the road I suspect fuel efficiency has gone up per tonne but we got many more tonnes which means in total we are doing worse.

        In a perfect world the government would just mandate new car sales fleet fuel efficiency will improve 0.2L/100km per year rolling average.

        Nobody would vote me into office if I said that everyone should just drive a Corolla Hybrid Sedan (I've seen 3.6L/100km real world).

        •  

          In a perfect world the government would just mandate new car sales fleet fuel efficiency will improve 0.2L/100km per year rolling average.

          This actually works if you base it by manufacturer, because it leads businesses to make make the decision. For example:

          • Toyota might choose to offer more hydrogen cars and subsidise the price by using profits from HiLux.
          • Mazda will offer batteries and rotary range extender across the range.
          • Ferrari will just buy credits from Tesla
      • +3 votes

        An alternative to this is to tax ICE vehicles, i.e. carbon tax since ICE produces carbon and has a negative impact to our environment and world that all of us pay for but not priced into the ICE vehicle.

        The point is to ensure the price of carbon is accounted for by either taxing carbon or subsidizing things that produce little to no carbon.

        It's not about discounting tesla, it's subsidising all EV.

        I pay almost $8 to go to work return and it's less than 30km return. That's $26.67/100km!! Taxi cost about $50/100k! If you have two people it's cheaper to get a taxi/uber than catch the train.

        Car o ly cost $10-15/100km to drive compared to train.

        It's cheaper for me to drive if i have 2 people including the parking cost than it is for me to catch public transport. Trains are already electric!!

        I think we might just have a very inefficient public transport system and subsidising it won't help reduce carbon emissions… Best to convert the ICE cars on the road over to EV time as people most probably keep their cars for 5-10 years.

        Soon there will be driverless cars/taxi so we can scrap public transport since it's so expensive and I suspect less people will use it if you can summon your car to drop you off/pick you up from work.

        Next technology is teleportation. :)

        • +1 vote

          Fuel tax is a substitute for an ICE vehicle tax and penalises cars that are inefficient.

          • +2 votes

            @mathew42: Fuel excise tax has been around for many decades in Australia, way before anybody cared about greenhouse gases.
            The original purpose of the fuel excise tax is usually for road maintenance and to fund the building of more roads. Nowadays the tax collected is just revenue and can be used for anything.

            The intention of fuel excise tax was never to penalise ICE.

            The point is also not to just tax ICE, its point is to tax anything that create net positive carbon.

            Here's some reference material to Australia's fuel excise tax

            •  

              @SeVeN11:

              The point is also not to just tax ICE, its point is to tax anything that create net positive carbon.

              I agree. My suggestion was that taxing fuel would be better than an ICE vehicle tax because it incentives carbon minimising behaviour. Simply restoring indexation of the excise and removing the diesel fuel rebate would be significant cost changers, especially if the fuel excise was adjusted to account for the lack of increase over the past 20 years.

              The social equity perspective is that the rich can afford to buy a newer more efficient car, whereas the poor are stuck with older less efficient cars which cost more to run.

        •  

          I think it would still be more efficient to have a driverless taxi to take you to the train and from the train to the office, would allow reducing the traffic and emmisions by a lot.

      • +3 votes

        Why exactly should the government subsidise the fossil fuel industry to the tune of around 29bn per year?
        Why does the fossil fuel industry get to eternalise their environmental and health costs?
        Where does the profit of multinational fuel companies go?

        At this stage, due to past inaction on climate, we need to pull every lever. So fuel/carbon tax and EV incentives etc. If the government supported EV's and had a clear target to decarbonise then more car companies would bring their products to Australia and there would be more choice. Tesla is selling in Australia despite the government.

        If we consider Wright's Law, prices for technology fall by a set percentage for each doubling of the product made. People who buy EV's early are helping the companies grow and make more products and thereby being able to manufacture them cheaper.

        Just for an example, Tesla has announced a $25k USD car for 2023. Other manufacturers are announcing products for other markets too but we are being left behind.

        https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2021-04-12/even-tesl...

    • -5 votes

      do more to encourage adoption

      If a product needs tax payers money to encourage people to buy it…the product clearly isn’t ready yet.

      • +4 votes

        No, government subsidy or similar would encourage market growth, in turn pushing other companies to import more electric cars into the market.

        It would push prices down in Australia and encourage cheaper options.

        So definitely a ozbargain initiative.

      • +3 votes

        If all externalities were factored into customer pricing, this would be a valid statement.

        The fact this isn't the case is more or less the entire basis for government.

      • +4 votes

        ICE car production in Australia had all sorts of taxpayer money thrown at it (Holden, Ford and Mitsubishi; and I assume Toyota). Tariffs to protect local production and high local pricing, millions in grants every time there was a whisper of a plant closure.

        •  

          I'd be happier for taxpayer money thrown to the Australian build Teslas, much less for the Chinese built ones.

          • +2 votes

            @DmytroP: Agreed. With the decommissioned car plants here, and the money already invested by the government, it would have seemed a natural fit.

          • +2 votes

            @DmytroP: Lobby your local MP to support Australian manufacturing for EV's

            We already have one of the world leaders in EV chargers right here in Australia: https://tritiumcharging.com/

      •  

        Oh the classic 'market failures can't hurt me because they don't exist', an ill informed libertarian's favourite argument.

    •  

      Personally I prefer a manual v8 / turbo any day - but as far as the environment goes, you’d think they would incentivize electric for sure.

  • +18 votes

    Correct me if I'm wrong, but at $89,900 + ORC, the Model 3 Performance probably is the cheapest new 'performance' sedan on the market?

    0-100 acceleration in 3.3 seconds.

    • +10 votes

      Where are you rushing to?