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Lenovo IdeaCentre Gaming 5 Gen 6 AMD Ryzen 7 5700G (8C/16T), RTX 3060 12GB, 16GB RAM, 512GB SSD $1759 Delivered @ Lenovo

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INTRO

This is would be considered a good deal if you want a small form factor gaming desktop that weighs approximately 6KG and comes with 3 year warranty on-site warranty.

Take advantage of Cashrewards or Shopback cashback offers to reduce the price even further.

If you pay with AMEX, you can take advantage of the $200 cashback statement credit for items over $1499. If you order now, it is scheduled to be shipped late August. I would assume it is before the 31st of August promotion end date.

https://www.ozbargain.com.au/node/637622

Processor

AMD Ryzen™ 7 5700G (8C / 16T, 3.8 / 4.6GHz, 4MB L2 / 16MB L3) (Zen 3 Architecture)
Operating System

Windows 10 Home 64
Display Type

N/A
Memory

1x 16 GB UDIMM DDR4-3200 (Supports 2 UDIMMs)
Hard Drive

512 GB SSD M.2 2280 PCIe NVMe
Optical Drive

None

Warranty

3 Year On-site

AC Adapter

380W 92%

Graphics

NVIDIA® GeForce RTX™ 3060 12GB GDDR6
Networking

Integrated 100/1000M

Form Factor

Tower

Keyboard

None

Pointing Device

No Mouse
WiFi Wireless LAN Adapters

802.11AX (2x2) & Bluetooth® 5.0

Related Stores

Lenovo
Lenovo
Brand

closed Comments

  • +2 votes

    that is one ugly case :P

    • +10 votes

      Each to their own. I built many custom builds, with great looking aluminum cases and custom water cooling, but most of the time they under a desk and hardly seen.

      • +3 votes

        I honestly wouldn't care about looks if the price was right ;) But this price is only so-so

      • -1 vote

        under the desk :0

    •  

      The cooling looks kinda bad too?

  • -1 vote

    Whats the brands?

  •  

    Not small form factor, that's a tower..

    • +11 votes

      145 x 292.2 x 365 mm, 13.6L

      25L or less is generally viewed as small form factor

      • -9 votes

        It takes full height cards. Generally, that is the difference between SFF and not.

        And the specs literally say "form factor : tower".

        • +2 votes

          silverstone sff case takes full height cards

        • +2 votes

          I think you need to refer to Intel's view of SFF for example . I think they know better!

          https://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/gaming/resources/sma...

          Quote:

          "There isn’t a universally agreed-upon definition, but there are some loose guidelines tied to case measurements. When discussing the internal layout and size of PC cases, volume is often an important consideration, and is usually measured in liters. A standard-size ATX desktop tower is usually around 40-45 liters. By comparison, a common measurement for SFF is around half of that — 25 liters or less."

          • -6 votes

            @shellshocked: Well that's the fun thing about definitions like this, anyone can really do what they want… There's no global standard or anything like that.

            Which one of these is the tower, and which is SFF?

            https://www.dell.com/en-au/work/shop/desktops-workstations-a...

            The Dell tower is almost exactly the same dimensions as this Lenovo. And I wouldn't call it a SFF at all. That's just confusing. And on a product listing it gets even worse.

            Lenovo call it a tower. It's a tower. It may fit into the definition of a SFF, but that's not what they sell it as. Hell, it might even be called a mini tower in the right circles…

          • +2 votes

            @shellshocked: Technically this would fit the SFF criteria but really it's a smaller than average tower.
            It's a bit like calling a 6 foot tall 15 year old a child, both are technically correct.

        • +1 vote

          yeah my case is 5.3L and it takes full height cards. some people use <20L some use <25L either way this is definitely SFF.

  • +4 votes

    Can Lenovo please bring 5700G system to the market without a dedicated GPU and costs 700-800$

    •  

      5700g … is that around gtx1650 ?

      • +1 vote

        Just a quick google search on performance reports shows its about GT 1030 performance, which is generally great for low settings 1080p gaming. i personally run a 1030 and plays most games no trouble at low 1080p

        •  

          interesting… i remember 2400g @ vega oc 1500mhz, with 3600 cl 16 ram, not far behind gt1030

          • +1 vote

            @phunkydude: Yep, but it did that with +50% CU count. so this is an improvement for CU count to performance, but because they've cut the CU count down means it still only just matches or slightly outperforms 2400g/3400g according to reviews (igpu)

      • +1 vote

        Around GT 1030 performance

      •  

        Closer to GT1030, so about 50% of 1650, but using DDR4 memory which is significantly slower than GDDR5 and has noticeable impact on performance.

        It's great for integrated, but not comparable to any dGPU from the last 2 gens, equivalent of lowest spec dGPU from 10-series.

        That RAM config is also single channel (1-stick), which would see a major improvement with a second memory slow being used

      •  

        1050/1050ti with fast ram (4400mhz+)

    • -3 votes

      Can probably sell the RTX 3060 for ~$1k, so already looking at it?

      Suppose could also go the other way, maybe sell the APU, buy a 5800X with minimal price difference?

      Still leaves the problem of single channel memory. Really no excuse in a system worth this much.

      • +6 votes

        No chance. 3060 Ti LHRs are 850 retail box… depends, might be lucky to get 900+ for non LHR.

        Would rather they take out the GPU and drop $700 on asking price.

    • +14 votes

      It seems such a waste of high end APU there.

      Ryzen 7 5700G could be stand alone system

      • +2 votes

        This guy gets it, :P

    • +2 votes

      still rocking a 2200g :)
      dying for the 5700g

      •  

        5700G will be my upgrade from 1600AF when it's cheaper, 8c/16t.

    •  

      They must know people will be selling it off without gpu

  • +2 votes

    Just note that it comes with 1x16GB RAM module.

    Ryzen excels because of its fast RAM access… So you should factor in buying a second 16GB RAM stick for ~$120 to get double data ram!

    •  

      true unless your planning on using the apu and selling gpu in which case, you want to sell that ass ram they ship it with and replace it with 2x8 b die.

  • +6 votes

    380W PSU?

    How bad is Lenovo with proprietary parts compared to Dell? Hope they dont run on 1.25v ram…

  •  

    Unless Lenovo is more friendly with generic parts, Dell will give a slightly better proposition with their recent deals.

    R10 3060ti for $300 more https://www.ozbargain.com.au/node/623765

    • 1000w vs 380w
    • wifi 6 vs wifi 5
    • RGB case - c'mon, it is a must have for high end PCs. (I will see myself out)
    • 1TB HDD - useless to most people
    • known AIO upgrade possibility

    This one seems ok at 1200$ for lazy people https://www.amazon.com.au/Lenovo-IdeaCentre-i5-10400-Windows...

    • -3 votes

      https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/333945171866

      Dell equivalent to the Lenovo barely skimps on CPU and offers superior GPU.

      I wouldn't trust the cooling in any of these Dell or Lenovo products, however.

        • +3 votes

          20% off with code, price is $1899

    •  

      Just wanted to confirm, the Dell deal isn't available right now…right?

  •  

    looking to pick up a desktop for 3d rendering, cad and creative cloud apps.. would this be a decent desktop to pick up?

    • +1 vote

      Wait for prices to drop. A system like this should be costing no more than $1400 - with better cooling - when things get relatively back to normal in the next couple of months (prices, not so much availability).

      •  

        Depends on how quickly you need it.

        Would keep an eye out for Dell Alienware… or go for custom builds posted here from time to time.

        Dont think the gaming card will be good for you. Quadro is the go to card for rendering/work, oppose to gaming. Ask your friends/colleagues on what they would recommend.

        • -3 votes

          At this price, I would rather buy a prebuilt machine made out of parts list. This is too expensive for what it is.

          The Alienware systems have marginally better parts, but sit in basically the same case, which is then sandwiched inside of a plastic hull for asthetics.

          Please, I beg of you: upskill your advice.

          •  

            @jasswolf: m… no… gaming card for rendering… no…

            i do some graphics work… and CPU carries the load. my friends that do it for a living… nvidia quadro…

            had it need to be picked between an Alienware to this Lenovo, Alienware for value propositionm the custom build ones posted. but gaming card is generally to avoid for work/industrial use on 3d rendering…

            you dont need to beg me. because i would not have recommended a gaming gpu for 3rendering, so, a system like this dropping below $1.4k is irrelevant.

            •  

              @keyboardwarrior: Quadro separates out in the product stack with unlocked FP64 performance, and ECC VRAM… for just about everything else there's the Geforce Studio driver branch if required, but I'm not on top of the exact level to which driver support and development is extended for a given application.

              CAD might be the use case that requires Quadro, but it's something worth picking away at their use case to figure out. I figured if they were interested in an RTX 3060, they'd already made a decision on that.

              All of the Dell, Alienware and Lenovo pre-builts are old school compact ATX cases that offer extremely limited cooling and airflow.

  • +1 vote

    I'd prefer an MSI Trident for around the same price and a much smaller, slimmer case.

    •  

      As far as I am aware, MSI doesn't provide a 3 year warranty.

  • +1 vote

    pointless product if you ask me

    • external power adapter so no gpu upgrade, also skimming very hard on size (only 380W) for this specs

    • 1 stick of ram, pretty much throwaway unless you need some for gpu mining

    • bottom tier motherboard, look at that rear IO

    why you would buy this over Dell is beyond my understanding

    • -2 votes

      Because no one would ever buy Dell.

      https://youtu.be/4DMg6hUudHE

      • +1 vote

        if they said that to the Dell, I imagine this will be a waste of sand when they review it

    • -2 votes

      In response to what you mentioned:

      The Lenovo had a smaller power supply because the 5700G has a TDP of 65w vs 95/125w of the Intel CPU in the Dell.

      In the Lenovo, you can upgrade the RAM to 32GB by adding another 16GB RAM because only one slot is occupied.

      The Dell offer you posted the 3060 has 8GB Vram vs 12GB of Vram of this version.

      I also don't believe it is best to judge the quality of motherboards by IO alone. I have done a lot of DIY builds where cheap motherboards have had good IO but had cheap VRMs etc This is what your average user doesn't notice but can also add to the cost of a motherboard and its overall quality.

      • +2 votes

        yes, it'll cost you at least $70 to upgrade the ram, which put this closer to the dell

        the Dell uses a 3060 ti, this is a 3060, performance of 3060ti is miles ahead of 3060. Higher vram is a gimmick if you're buying for gaming

        yes, you can, easiest differentiation between motherboard is io, if the rear io is like this, you can guarantee that it's very cheap and bottom tier motherboard

        • +2 votes

          The Dell also only comes with a 1 year warranty vs 3 years of this deal. Based on what you posted the additional warranty from Dell is $230.

          • -1 vote

            @shellshocked: 1 year on site warranty + many years with ACCC, more than sufficient

            •  

              @ln28909: Only if you want the hassle of dealing with the ACCC. I would prefer something that is legally binding that states 3 years vs hoping for support after 1 year.

              •  

                @shellshocked: so in the end, your argument to buying a much weaker pc for similar price of a better one is because it has 3 years warranty vs 1 year warranty?

                •  

                  @ln28909: No argument. Just stating a fact about 3 year warranty provided by Lenovo, which is legally binding in Australia. You stated Dell has 1 year warranty, and rest is up to the buyer to deal with the ACCC, and hope they get support after it expires without paying $230 extra that's it. Dell is not legally obliged after the warranty expires in 1 year.

                  •  

                    @shellshocked: sure, so you're willing to forgo performance in exchange for warranty. Also keep in mind that the Dell is by no mean a good deal

                    which then begs the question, how is this a bargain? Overpriced but has long warranty?

      •  

        It's a 3060 Ti, it wildly outperforms this card, to the tune of almost 30%.

      • +2 votes

        Recently I have taken apart many of the current Dells (Optiplex SFFs, Alienwares) for upgrades. Done a separate afterthough post on ozb taking apart an R10 5800x

        Dell/Lenovo are good for:
        - lazy ppl
        - value for money in current market given GPU price is insane with stock issue
        - tool-less assembly-disassembly

        Dell/Lenovo (and other prebuild) is notorious for:
        - proprietary parts (Dell as an example uses 1.25v xmp ram vs generic 1.35v)… good luck trying to pair rams.
        - limited upgrade possibility as the case is built/engineered to component/spec with minimal spare room
        - Def not as bad as what some reviewers made it out to be

        To be fair to Dell, some reviews are purposely done so that makes Dell/Alienware look really bad. For example, calling R10 idle with CPU running 30% out of the box (hinting it is due to bloatware). In fact, it is due to both Windows and Dell running upgrades in the background when the PC first fired up. Once all upgrades are done, idle is indifferent to any other PC.

    • +3 votes

      Where are you getting the external power adapter from?
      You can clearly see it uses a TFX power supply

      •  

        agree, the picture looks like a normal psu, however the description is AC adapter, so I took a wild guess

  •  

    I finally want a gaming PC that can play all the latest games well. Would this be good? Sorry don't know much about gaming PCs….

    •  

      It will play games well yes, but value for money or satisfaction? Absolutely not.

      •  

        Is that because i'm not building it?

        •  

          Because you can get better specs if you wait for another techfast deal

          •  

            @ChickenAdobo: God no. I wouldn't be opting for their builds either in all honesty. You really get what you pay for in the PC world.

            • +1 vote

              @dsiritz: And yet they are still better than this (and Dell/Alienware).

    •  

      If you only play at 1080p, this one should be sufficient, if 1440p, go 3060 ti, 6700xt or higher

    •  

      3060 is solid 1080p gaming on high settings and no need to upgrade for another 2-3 years unless you want to play latest and greatest

      might struggle 1440p

  • -2 votes

    Seems way too expensive for a 3060 and Ryzen 5 (Even if it is the APU one) system. 3080's are 800 now and the rest of the system doesn't exactly scream amazing for 1000.

    •  

      It's a Ryzen 7 based 5700G system, not Ryzen 5, as stated in the headline.Please also provide a link where a Nvidia 3080 is $800 AUD now as proof of your statement.

      •  

        My bad on the 5, it's a 7, still too expensive, considering GPU prices are coming down. Did you not see the 3060 Ti's for 850? Take away 50 from the 1000 I said and for 950 its still not screaming amazing. Single stick ram and external power supply to name a few things that aren't stellar.

        •  

          Just to correct what you stated. It's not an external power supply, but a TFX power supply.

          In relation to a single stick of RAM, it would come down to users preference. Considering that it has two slots:

          1. Would you prefer two sticks of 8GB of RAM, in dual channel, and having to throw away those sticks if you need to upgrade.
          2. Have a single stick of 16GB of RAM, with the future option to upgrade to 32GB and dual channel capability, by adding another 16GB without having to throwing away anything.
      •  

        Also didn't mean to say 3080, that was a typo, meant to say 3060. Was looking at 3080's recently had them on my mind.

    •  

      When a 3060 Ti @ $850 is considered a good buy where are you seeing 3080s for $800 ?
      A 3060 non-ti is around 20% slower than a ti, so a 3060 non-ti (if you can find one) should be worth around $680.

      •  

        A 3060 Ti for 850 makes this even worse, as I said to Shell in my previous reply, for 950 the rest of the system isn't that great and that's taking in a 3060 Ti. If you hang around ozbargain and grab one of those 3600x + mobo bundles for ~350 and get a 3060Ti for 850, that's 1200, which leaves 559 for you to pick better ram, psu, case and M2 for decent gaming rig. Might be a bit more than 559, probably around 700 but that extra 141 will give you much better parts. Right now a R7 APU is better on its own for a 1200 build rather then being forced in with a 3060. But each to their own. There is nothing wrong here, just not a stellar deal, specially that ram.

        • +2 votes

          As I’ve said already further below, these OEM pre-builts are not targeted for the PC building enthusiasts, so negging it based on sale prices of individual parts is not a fair assessment. These are for those who want a working PC out of the box with a good warranty. The 3 year onsite warranty alone is worth over $250, its not something usually offered in this price point, if something goes wrong a tech will come to your home and fix it on-site, which can make a huge difference for the target audience. Don’t forget you are also getting a free copy of Windows home which is again a $100+ expense with a DIY system.

          •  

            @opt: Fair points, I didn't see that side of the picture, I was very much looking at it from a pc enthusiast point of view. The system being already built, warranty, fix on site and windows definitely make this a deal. I have revoked my negative.

        • +1 vote

          Honestly your comparison of individual component pricing is an apples to oranges and does not take into consideration.

          1. Cost to pay reseller to build the PC, or time taken to build it yourself.
          2. Dealing with warranty issues of each individual component, compared to speaking directly with the OEM's support of the PC to resolve the issue
          3. Cost of 3 year on-site warranty and having a tech come to your premises to fix the PC vs taking back the individual component to a reseller or resellers to solve the warranty problem, and not having your PC in action until the component is fixed.
          •  

            @shellshocked: Yeah I have to agree, my view was very narrow, perhaps force of habit, the points you have listed along with Opt are definitely worthy of a deal at this price. I have revoked my negative.

      •  

        Also didn't mean to say 3080, that was a typo, meant to say 3060. Was looking at 3080's recently had them on my mind.

    •  

      3080's are 800 now

      Where?

      •  

        I meant to say 60, had 80 on my mind from earlier, didn't realise I said that.

  •  

    Almost 1.8K for a 3060 system?

    Remember 3080 system was only 2K

    why is this a deal?