expired PPSR/REVS Vehicle Check $3.40 @ PPSR.gov.au

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I know this deal has been posted a few times in the past, but there may be quite a few people who still don't know about this amazing tool. I recently used it to check on a car I was looking at for a friend and it came up with results I wouldn't have ever know otherwise! Thank you so much to Spackbace for the initial post of it.

I thought this was worth posting again, as deals can pass very quickly and some people may have forgotten about this amazing service.


Thank you to Spackbace for this write up:

The PPSR is used to find out if there's any money owing on a car, or if it's previously been written off.

This is the normal price, there's no denying that, however many people don't realise how cheap and easy the service is. Many sites offer the same thing for $10 or more, when the standard government price is considerably less!

A few horror stories in the forums lately would've been sorted very early on if they had've consulted this site before buying/putting a deposit down.

Bookmark the site, after test driving the car you're looking at, sit in your car and generate the check, then decide from there if you want to purchase the car.


As always, enjoy!

Related Stores

Personal Property Securities Register
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closed Comments

  • +73 votes

    Alright you get it this time, but my turn in 6 months

  • +3 votes

    Thanks mate, that is handy to know.

  • +11 votes

    @jv wants to know, what is the normal price?

    • +1 vote

      $3.40

      • +7 votes

        So… Not a deal?

        • +5 votes

          Depends on how one defines "deals". There are certainly third parties out there trying to charge more for this service.

        • +5 votes

          In the past I’ve paid $30 or more to these third parties not knowing it was so cheap on the government site.

        •  

          @AmyLK: to be fair, the 3rd party ones also provide history of sales for that vehicle but still not worth $30 for most.

        • +2 votes

          Nope not a deal, don't worry about defining blah blah blah. This has been the everyday price for the past few years

        •  

          It is $3.40 at PPSR website for the last 5 years atleast …. not sure how this is a deal ? Its more of an educational exercise for people who didn't knew it existed. Should be in the forums.

      • +1 vote

        Yep, normal price. This has been posted here previously.

  • +8 votes

    Do this before ever looking at a car. At best you save a nightmare experience, at worst you get peace of mind.

    Once saved me a drive to Frankston :)

    • +11 votes

      Same. Was looking to buy a car that looked perfect and was super clean. Did the check and found out it was water damaged in the Brisbane floods and written off.

      • +5 votes

        Yeah my experience was a car that looked a bit too cheap from one of those "dealers" who operate from a shed. Turns out the car was a repairable write off, which he neglected to mention in the ad or on the phone. I did a PPSR check and saved a 4-hour journey.

        •  

          I thought by law they have to tell you if its been written off.

          Doesn't it literally say that on the Vicroads transfer papers? (may be different for NSW etc)

        •  

          @jaackyy: Most of those (in the states I'm aware of) only apply to dealers. There are very very few requirements on private sellers - they're almost always on an "as-is" basis.

        •  

          @jaackyy: They probably do, and this guy was a licensed dealer. I didn't bother chasing it up - I hadn't bought the car or even gone to see it.

        •  

          @HighAndDry: this guy was a licensed dealer. I didn't buy the car - did the PPSR check before leaving to go look at it. In hindsight I probably should have reported him, but at the time I was just relieved I hadn't been conned :)

    • +12 votes

      I'd pay $3.40 to not go to frankston any day.

  • +9 votes

    I work for a car finance company (I know, sue me)! I recommend that you use this EVERY TIME you buy a car (at least for private purchases).

    I do see some people who don't and it doesn't always turn out well for them.

    • +13 votes

      You could, but taking a person's word for something on a purchase as large as a car wouldn't be worth it over a government report in my opinion. Even if you got them to write a declaration I personally would just get the report, especially for this price.

        • +7 votes

          My friend had put a $2k deposit down before I got involved. It was a late model car with low km's. My friend said the seller dropped the price by a couple thousand very quickly to low $10k's. My alarm bells really started ringing when I asked the seller's nationality.

          The guy asked which bank my friend was with so they could give the same bank details so the transaction would go through faster. CBA were no use to cancel the transaction.

          My friend ended up threatening to sue to get the money back.

          When my friend initially inspected the car, the seller had a sob story how they needed the money and even got their kids in on the act. Really scummy guy.

        • +13 votes

          @phil1311: >My alarm bells really started ringing when I asked the seller's nationality.

          Were they Australian?

        • +17 votes

          @phil1311: i'm lebanese and would never buy from a leb!

        • +4 votes

          @phil1311: Ha. Coulda guessed when you mentioned nationality. It's really weird - they're some of the nicest people in person or if they're a friend, but when it comes to business they're absolutely ruthless, no lines they're not willing to cross. It's such a harsh dichotomy.

  •  

    Can I pay by paypal

    • +1 vote

      Not with the government website, however some of the competitor sites do offer Paypal payments.

  • +4 votes

    Anyone remember when REVS checks used to be free?

  •  

    Is this the exact same check that some sites charge $30 for, and others charge $9.90 for? Or does it give you less info?

    Also, does it give you the name and address the car is registered by?

    •  

      As far as I know they are same same, except you get some 'market indication' from the pricy ones.

    • +8 votes

      The same
      This is the source of the information
      The other websites just package it nicely for you

      •  

        sounds like the deal for "A piece of land in Mars…" nicely packaging as well.

      • +3 votes

        We paid 30 for it on carsales :( dont take my ozbargain badge I have kids to feed

        • +1 vote

          I'd still rather pay $30 for it than not check it. The only reason I would've used PPSR is because I know it through my work, that's a good lesson to learn.

    •  

      Will it give their address? Our car got stolen and the cctv got their license plate, so I'm curious of I can get their address this way. The police have done nothing for 2 weeks, haven't even started their investigation. Of course it could have been a stolen car they were using, in which case an address would not be useful.

      •  

        From memory, no. If you report it stolen when someone gets the report generated the PPSR report will note that it has been stolen. The report generally says if money is owing, insurance claimed/repaired or stolen.

        Oops, misread your comment. You need the VIN to get a report. You could put their license plate into a car insurance site to get the year and make. Unless they stole the plates.

        • +1 vote

          So if I do the check, it will tell me if the car they used was stolen, but either way won't give me the address?

          I can get the VIN, I got it by free searching the Dept of Transport for their rego, and it confirmed the model of car, and gave me the VIN.

          So no way to get the address with a license plate and VIN?

        •  

          @Biggles266: Not via a PPSR/REVS check. I wonder if you can sue them in court (with "them" being unnamed to begin with), then subpoenaing the RMS/equivalent in your state, for their address via their number plate.

          Honestly, the police can check this, they're just lazy.

        • +1 vote

          @HighAndDry: no kidding. "Investigations are continuing", but when I pressed for more detail I was told (after a full week), a person had been assigned, but the investigation hadn't actually started.

        • +2 votes

          @Biggles266: that’s great Aussie public service for u

  • -2 votes

    This is the normal price. Not a bargain.

  • +1 vote

    Anyone see a benefit on purchasing for your own car, if you're planning to sell? And willingly provide it to potential buyers as extra piece of mind?

    Would come across to me as you're proactively showing the car is as its stated.. interested to know as I'm in the process of selling mine, and wouldn't mind a quicker sale.

    •  

      I don't think it would make a difference.
      Having a mechanical report or rwc would be better

    • +1 vote

      I would still purchase my own even if the seller provided one. Who is to say the sellers version isn't photoshopped?

      •  

        Good point..! This post is still helpful, I'll be recommending potential buyers to purchase it.

        Thanks again OP.

    •  

      I think it might help.
      I was thinking of the very same thing.

      If you can provide all service history and this check as well - even if they don't value the check, it shows you're not trying to hide anything and that you're legit.

    •  

      I think on Carsales they give you the option to purchase it through them when you list the car, which they then make available to prospective buyers directly through the site. That makes it more credible.

      If you were providing it yourself, I honestly would still get my own report just to be safe so it wouldn't really move the needle much.

    •  

      That would make sense if the certificate is stored and shown on a website providing the service, to be confident it's not tampered by a seller.
      Some 3rd party providers do exactly that but charge more.

  • -3 votes

    if you dont know about this, you shouldnt be buying a car privately

    • +3 votes

      What a useless comment. Might as well as say, you shouldn't buy anything unless you have done the best peer reviewed research.
      Obviously most people have done a revs check but did not know this was the cheapest option. As you can see from many other posts, people have done their checks with other third party companies which cost between $10-$30. This is really just 0.1% cost of the car.

  • +1 vote

    Long time lurker, first time poster. Thanks OP! was hoping to buy a car this weekend and this has saved me a bit. Wife will be pleased. Legend.

  •  

    Damn, paid $25 for this yesterday. Thought I was buying off a .gov website too…

  • +4 votes

    This is going to be changed to $2 very soon.

  •  

    Can someone explain to an idiot why it's important to know if the previous owner still owes money for the car being sold? Houses are sold all the time with mortgages still owing?

    • +2 votes

      No they're not, they are settled and all monies owing are paid out before title can be transferred. They have mortgages on them at the time the contract of sale is signed, but not at the end of settlement.

    • +1 vote

      The way securities work is that the finance company have a right to the car if the loan is not repaid. This security is against the car and doesn't go away just because the owner sells the car. If you buy a car with finance owing, and the previous owner does not repay the loan with the money, the finance company can repossess your car even though you have nothing to do with them.

      If the owner is open and honest that their car is under finance, as a buyer you can pay the outstanding amount directly to the finance company and the rest to the owner which is a bit more of a faff but is completely fine. If the owner is trying to hide the finance on the car… you run.

    • +1 vote

      Simply put, the person selling you the car isn't the owner of the car, and neither will you be, even after paying.

      The previous owner is still responsible for the loan, but if they don't clear it, the finance can take the vehicle.

  • +1 vote

    U not only buy the car but the debt also, afaik…

  •  

    Just a tip for anyone doing it, dont use the mobile site as when you enter the VIN it is entered as the serial number with no option to select VIN and wont show the written off history."Nevdis has responded with no vehicle information for this serial number".

    You need to use the full site or from a PC and select VIN search. I had to pay for another damn search when I did it.

  •  

    I've used this a ton. It showed me outstanding finance on a dirt bike I wanted to buy, and a written off road bike, that I still bought as it happened out of state 10 years ago and was reregistered… it's great, should be free though.

    I am very interested what extra info you get from the ' vehicle history report' from the RTA website, the one that links following a rego check at MYSERVICE. Owners/KMs/insurance claims? It's 30 bucks I've never done that one.

  • +2 votes

    The online search fee is dropping to $2 on 1 August. https://www.legislation.gov.au/Details/F2018L01001

    • +1 vote

      Awesome! I might actually post that up as a new deal, thank you so much for that information!

      • +3 votes

        I'm gonna set my phone alarm for 11:59 on the 31st July….. gonna sneak it in before ya. ;)

  • +1 vote

    awesome service, used it for many cars, in WA it used to be revs, but i dont think that covered repairable write offs only debt

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