expired ThinkPad Ryzen E485 (14" FHD IPS/Ryzen 5 2500U/8GB DDR4/128GB NVMe) $809.10, E585 (15.6" FHD) $854.10 @Lenovo AU (+10% ShopBack)

940
AMD10

Extra 10% off limited time sale for the new Thinkpad E-series, E485 and E585, with Ryzen Mobile APUs (coupon code AMD10).
(ShopBack is having a 10% cashback rate at the moment too! As per ragrum's confirmation with ShopBack rep, the cashback stacks!)

The devices have an unoccupied internal 2.5" SATA port for storage expansion. (Thanks kasaresj for linking a youtube how-to for internal components access.)

For $809.10, the base spec of E485 is very similar to the base spec of the popular intel i5-equipped E480 (just $10.10 more for this E485 with better graphics). (Full spec see https://www.lenovo.com/au/en/laptops/thinkpad/thinkpad-edge/...):

  • AMD Ryzen™ 5 2500U Quad-Core (4 Cores 8 Threads, 2 GHz base frequency, 3.6 GHz boost)
  • Integrated AMD Radeon™ Vega 8 Graphics
  • 14.0" FHD IPS (1920x1080) AntiGlare Display
  • 8GB(4+4) DDR4 2400MHz Memory
  • 128GB Solid State Drive PCIe OPAL2.0 M.2 2242 (16GT/s)
  • Windows 10 Home 64-bit
  • WiFi Qualcomm QCNFA435AC, 1x1 + Bluetooth 4.1
  • 2 x USB 3.1 (1 x AlwaysOn), 1 x USB 2.0, 1 x USB 3.1 Type-C, 1x HDMI, Ethernet (RJ45), MicroSD, Combo audio/mic jack
  • Dimensions (W x D x H) 329 x 242 x 21.9 mm
  • Starting at 1.75 kg

The 15.6" E585 is $854.10 with the same base spec, except bigger screen and chasis.
https://www.lenovo.com/au/en/laptops/thinkpad/thinkpad-edge/...


CPU performance wise, the Ryzen 5 and 7 APUs are on par with intel's i5 and i7 U-series mobile quad-cores, while graphics wise the integrated Vega 8's performance is lesser than the discrete nVidia MX150, but on par/better than MX130/940MX, depending on benchmark/tests.

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closed Comments

  • +1 vote

    128GB NVMe,256GB would be ideal and standard soon.
    I have a L480 with 8/256, pretty good. The old T430 with 4/500 struggled a lot, felt more solid.

    •  

      Is it worth upgrading to 256 GB for $100 dollars? Or replace the existing one and use as a 128 gb backup? I guess that means you would have to get a new copy of windows?

      I am just about to pull the trigger, just the 128 gb is a bit concerning… but for $720 (after cashback) seems like a great deal.

      • +1 vote

        With the current and upcoming eBay sales and manufacturer rebate promo of NVMe SSDs, it is better value if you upgrade the SSD yourself. You won't need to buy a new copy of Windows, as OEM Windows tags to your motherboard/BIOS, so you'll just need to install Windows onto the new SSD.

        If budget is really tight, I'd recommend just having the 128GB SSD as the main boot drive, and add a 1TB 2.5" SATA 7mm HDD to the internal SATA port for storage (<$70 delivered from various shops, or for eBay Plus members if eBay merchants). If you'd like improved speed/more space, then opt for a 256GB M.2 NVMe SSD as per above too.

        •  

          Any recommended deals on NVMe?

        •  

          @Hieu:
          This seems pretty okay https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/173379635906 (don't forget the 15% off code, and use eBay Plus), if you are planning on adding a HDD to the SATA for large capacity storage. (Or, just try out the SSD it comes with first, and see whether to buy or not).

          Alternatively, if you just want upgrade and less hassle about second drive, then a large capacity SATA m.2, https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/173373687870 .

        •  

          @zrmx:
          Thanks. Was tossing up between the WD Blue and the Samsung Evo 9700. $100 difference but seems lightyears apart from reviews I've read.

          I've noticed however that they're both 2280 and the Thinkpad in OP comes with a 2242. Can the 2280 be mounted?

        •  

          @Hieu:
          I haven't looked up their service manual to confirm yet, but considering the SSD upgrade options are 2280, it should be able to accommodate 2280.

  • +6 votes

    very solid laptop for the money. I would say better than the Intel equivalent e480 due to Vega graphics.

    •  

      I would say better than the Intel equivalent e480 due to Vega graphics.

      What makes AMD's integrated graphics better than that of Intel?

      • +1 vote

        AMD also produces graphics cards so they have better expertise in the area.

        I haven't seen the mobile bench marks but a desktop Ryzen APU is roughly equal to a intel processor + a low to mid range graphics card.

        So likely slight worse cpu performance overall but better in large tasks (due to quad core) and significantly better graphics performance.

      • +1 vote

        Intel integrated graphics was designed to give you a basic level of performance with minimal power usage and cost - perfect for office and productivity type stuff, but for games it'll barely get by.

        AMDs 2500u was designed as an "accelerated processing unit", i.e. a CPU and GPU in one unit. The idea was that it could offer the performance of a dedicated GPU but use up less power and space and be much more efficient than having a separate discreet unit.

        In the real world, the AMD 2500u can play some AAA games (albeit at reduced quality settings) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IqGnYR_bNIg
        Graphically it's a bit less powerful than the Nvidia MX150, though sucks less power and is smaller, so it can be used in thinner/lighter laptops than the latter.

        •  

          Powerful enough and even more for watching movies but don't buy this (or similar) kind of laptops if you pretend to do gaming.
          Bare in mind that many games require a separate graphic card.

      •  

        Double to triple the graphics performance depending on the Intel comparison and included RAM speed.

  •  

    15.6 may be my new photo processing rig.

    256gb ssd + 32gb ram and dock $1600 MMmm..

    • +2 votes

      the screen only covers about 58% of sRGB, so it's not really for that purpose.

    • +3 votes

      in general, it is easier to build a photo editing rig using cheaper laptop models (think IdeaPad in case of Lenovo).
      the reasons:

      • it is very easy to replace LCD panel (you can put in a color accurate IPS FullHD and have a top-class screen and color accuracy)
      • they come with crappy TN HD panels, so you are not over-paying for the screen you're going to put on the shelf
      • they are easy to maintain (replace HDD -> SSD, add RAM)

      I built mine on IdeaPad 310 with i7-7500u.

      • +1 vote

        Which screen did you replace the stock one with?

        • +3 votes

          there are only a few models that both offer good color accuracy, and fit this model. you can look them up on PaneLook. eDP 30 pin, fixation on top and bottom of the screen.

          Basically, your best bet is either of these:
          - B156HAN01.1 (or .2)
          - LTN156HL01-101 (or 02-201)
          - LP156WF6-SP family (SP-B1, SP-B2, SP-B5, SP-P2)

          Depends on what your supplier can come up with. I ended up with LP156WF6-SP-P2 from LG, and it is a very decent panel with 72% of sRGB coverage, and I have calibrated it for photo work. I ended up paying about $120 delivered. You can't get anything better than 72% sRGB for this combination of parameters. LTN156HL01-101 is the best (Samsung panel) if you can get hold of one.

          Please note that all panels above are 60Hz refresh rate. There are also a couple of models with 120Hz refresh rate, but they eat more power, and rumors have it that you can't change brightness on them if you install it into a laptop that normally comes with a 60Hz screen, so I haven't tried those, and I can't say I would advise you to.

          There are also TN panels that promise full sRGB coverage, and they provide IPS-like viewing angles left to right, but top to bottom it's TN like 20-35 degrees, so you have to hunt for the correct angle, which doesn't help with accuracy. Calibrated it looks amazing, but you can never be sure what's the right angle, which defeats the purpose. It is great for gaming though, with faster response times than IPS can deliver. the model I have is N156HGA-EAL. I don't need it and can sell it, but I find it not suitable for photo work - despite amazing color space coverage.

    • +2 votes

      my algorithm for photo rig build:
      - regularly check OZB and refurbished laptop sales for good laptop deals
      - if a laptop has a good processor (a recent i7 or i5 preferred), as new condition, no touch screen, and awesome price, proceed
      - go to LaptopScreens.com and look up exact model. Get the screen parameters (how is it fixed, connector type and pin number). Majority of laptop models I come across are built around the same screen standard: 30 pin eDP, fixed on top and bottom.
      - look up the model of the laptop on youtube for screen replacement videos. Some material can be found on iFixit. You just need to make sure it's not hard to replace the screen (too hard = you need to disassemble the whole laptop. ThinkPad's are like this, for example).
      - chat to LaptopScreens about the exact panel model you want, and check what they have in stock
      - order the screen, order the laptop

      optional step: sell for $1k on eBay.

      done.

  •  

    If I bought this one, I'd be able to add more RAM in the future, right?

    •  

      8Gb will be fine for a while. No doubt if it isnt it will be time to get a new laptop anyway. Unless your doing photoshop/video editing etc, but then again im not sure you would be getting this laptop for that

    •  

      maintenance of this particular model (E480/85, E580/85) is a bit tricky. The whole bottom cover needs to come off, and it's held by screws + plastic latches, and latches are easy to break.

      so while it's possible yes, it is a bit tricky to add RAM or HDD later on.

    •  

      As others mentioned bit of a tricky model to open up, you'll require a few basic tools (ie iFixit opening picks/cards/etc) to do it properly and safely. It only takes a few minutes, but it can be a little difficult as there's various clips holding the back on.

    •  

      If you do, keep in mind that ryzen really loves dual channel memory

  •  

    Nearly everything you could need, sadly doesn't have thunderbolt 3. Hooking up a external GPU would make this a amazing deal.

  •  

    Would anyone be able to answer these 2 questions? I checked but couldn't find the answers
    1. Do these have Backlit keyboards
    2. Can they be charged (or even kept on) with USB-A to USB-C cable?

    • -1 vote

      You can find these under customization options:

      Keyboard
      Keyboard - English

      Power Cord
      45W AC Adapter (3pin) - ANZ (USB Type C)

    •  

      My wife's Intel based inspron 15 5000 can charge on usb c… Maybe the dell ryzen inspron will… And they have backlit keys!

      To type on I much prefer the lenovo keyboard of my e450

    •  

      Won't charge off USB-A to USB-C, you'll need a USB-C PD charger supporting 45W output. A lot of powerbanks with PD support this, ie ZMI 20,000mAh type-c.

      Believe backlit keyboard is optional, but it sometimes doesn't let you customise your selection on sales.

    •  

      Edit: double post oops

  •  

    Whats the vega 8 graphics like? ANy good for actual gaming?

  •  

    Was about to pull the trigger on this but a quick look on Notebookcheck for the Intel models showed they get quite hot.

    Do Ryzens run a bit cooler?

  • +2 votes

    Woo-hoo. Been waiting to buy this. The discount is icing on the cake.

  •  

    extra $100 to double the SSD to 256

  •  

    Looking to upgrade to 16GB RAM - would it be better to get 2 x 8 or 1 x 16? I'm assuming 1 x 16 to enable adding an additional card later down the track, but is there a performance benefit to running 2 x 8 instead?

    Also how hard would it be to self-install a second SSD in place of the SATA slot?

    • +1 vote

      2x 8 will run slightly faster. By the time most users need 32gb ram the CPU would be very dated.

    • +2 votes

      as per kasaresj

      "maintenance of this particular model (E480/85, E580/85) is a bit tricky. The whole bottom cover needs to come off, and it's held by screws + plastic latches, and latches are easy to break.

      so while it's possible yes, it is a bit tricky to add RAM or HDD later on."

    • +1 vote

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IDkoD0iF-Xs this is e480, but they share the chassis. With the right tools yes anything can be done.

      •  

        Thanks for this. Looks relatively straight forward compared to some of the Dells I've opened up over the years.

        Do you happen to know where the 'first drive' slot is sitting? It's not in the video you linked but I'm hoping it's just an empty optical caddy that can be replaced with an SSD but can't seem to see any space in the pics.

        • +1 vote

          both drives are on bottom left of that video when the cover is removed. large shiny rectangle is the "first drive", takes a 2.5 SATA drive. Right above it is the "second drive" NVMe slot.

        •  

          @kasaresj:
          Ok totally missed it was M2 SSD. Thanks!

    • +1 vote

      2x8GB will provide significantly more bandwidth for the GPU side of this Ryzen APU if gaming is a use case for you.

  •  

    Hmm Wifi not customisable. Can it be done aftermarket?

  • +2 votes

    @GotYourBack, can you confirm if this code (AMD10) will work with Shopback? Thanks!

    • +1 vote

      I also sent a private message and received a reply this evening:

      Thanks for reaching out. At this stage we are unsure of whether this code will stack with cashback or not, but we have contacted Lenovo for clarification.

      We should get a response tomorrow.

      • +1 vote

        Good news. They replied and confirmed the code is eligible for cashback. I believe the deal ends at 11:59pm tonight.

        Confirming it stacks!

  • +1 vote

    Totally jealous of anyone who gets this.
    I'm tempted to buy it and sell my E470 to get the vega gfx.

    Edit: Actually, it looks like the Ideapad with the same specs suffers from thermal throttling (compared with other 2500U-Vega-8 systems:

    https://www.notebookcheck.net/Lenovo-Ideapad-720S-Ryzen-2500...

    Search for "System Performance" it's about half-way down.

    Our review clearly shows that taking an existing notebook design and swapping the Intel CPU for an AMD Ryzen 5 2500U does not cut it. If Lenovo would have spent some time and effort on adapting the cooling solution to the brand-new AMD CPU, the Ryzen-based IdeaPad 720s could have become a true alternative to Intel’s 8th generation Core processors.

    I was really tempted to get this and sell my E470 to benefit from the amd mesa drivers for the vega, but I'll give it a miss until next year.

    •  

      cooling differs a lot between models, and by looking at the E480 disassembly, there might be more airflow going through, improving overall picture.

      In my experience, based on a few very different units, AMD CPU in a laptop is bad news. I hope this model will change the pattern.

      •  

        I read about that people were sulking about heating issues with the E470. I have one and it's fine.
        Hopefully it's the same with this one, good luck!

        •  

          I will not buy one, I already have an i7 7500u Lenovo that I am extremely happy with, and I don't buy new laptops anyway)

  •  

    is it good enough for photoshop and light video editing?

    compare to Dell Inspiron 15 7000 i5-7300HQ/GTX1050 - the price difference is about $150, but dell is too heavy and bulky

    • +1 vote

      well, 2500U is on par with i5-8250u according to reviews. It all depends on cooling solution, and configured TDP, though.
      i5-8250u is roughly same performance as 7300hq. so I guess you are getting similar performance to your Dell.

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