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AMD Ryzen 3 3300X (Tray CPU) $170 (When Purchased with a Min. $79 AM4 Motherboard) + Delivery @ SaveOnIt

900

The 3300X is on par with the 3600 in terms of gaming, but the downside is it only has 4c8t.
Also for $69 $79 more you can add the Asus Prime - A520M.

Edit: Price dropped to $170
Edit2: Price of mobo gone up to $79

Note: Cannot be purchased as a Standalone item. Must be purchased with a AM4 motherboard.

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closed Comments

  • +2 votes

    Good value for a low budget and low spec build!
    I paid $250 for one in October last year for my in-law's gaming rig…

    • +1 vote

      Your FIL plays Warzone?

      •  

        Nope.

  • +1 vote

    using this paired with a 2060 Super, runs like great in 1080p gaming, excellent price and stock cooler is more than enough too

  • +7 votes

    I rate this, rate this a lot.

    3300X is a great gaming CPU, don't worry about how many cores it's about overall performance and this does well for it's price.

    I wouldn't get this if you're doing CPU intensive work programs (I don't mean normal word processing, I mean very specific use cases), or if you're going to stream necessarily, otherwise, don't hold back, get a solid cooler and enjoy.

  • +2 votes

    Shipping to metro areas is $14.30 in case anyone is wondering

  • +1 vote

    I thought this was more like a 1600 / 1600af. ? Is it worth and upgrade on this ( I will repurpose the 1600 af for my htpc)

    • +11 votes

      1600 is Zen, 1600af is a 2600 which is Zen+, 3300X is a Zen 2. It uses the same architecture as the 3600 and has slightly faster single core performance but loses two cores. In multi core workloads the 1600af will beat it but in gaming the 3300X dominates the 1600af and even slightly beats out the 3600 if the game doesn't need 6 cores. If you're running a 1600 I'd probably look at a 3600 as you're getting more of a side upgrade with the 3300X (better CPU overall but still losing two cores which will even it out in many scenarios)

      • +8 votes

        This person is correct.

        edit: didn't want to assume your gender

      • +2 votes

        Also the 3300X is a single CCX design which gets rid of the inter core latency penalty on Ryzen CPUs when going across the CCX. The 3100 is a two CCX design, 2 cores in each CCX as is the 3600.

        But you need a cooler, the 10400F probably works out cheaper if you run the stock cooler.

        •  

          Very good point. I think that contributes a lot to the better gaming performance over the 3600 even though it's just a quad core.

      • +2 votes

        Thanks. I'll just get this to chuck on my Mrs rig. I'm running WC so got a spare cooler

  • +1 vote

    Can get a 3500X on aliexpress for 20 bucks more.

    • +2 votes

      4/8 vs 6/6.

      • +4 votes

        6/6 > 4/8 every day, in every single workload, both real and synthetic.

        Threads are not like real cores, they only offer like 20% benefit max in synthetic benchmarks; and less in real workloads.

        In your CPUs you only have cores, threads are just a way to utilise the spare slack capacity in individual areas of a core (e.g. floating point, ALU, memory IO) for another process to run, while the main process is waiting.

        •  

          in the case for 3300x vs 3500x, the 3300x is faster in single core and basically equal in multicore in benchmarks

      •  

        SMT is 20-30% more performance compared to a real core. It's more like a 5 core vs 6 core chip.

  • +1 vote

    Not bad good size. The price is right for 4c/8t.

  •  

    Solid…

  • +11 votes

    10400F still a far better deal

    • +3 votes
      • 110 for the motherboard. Total $80 more
  •  

    isnt 4c8t really dated? I've got an i7 4770 which has 4c8t and that's 7years old

    I'm looking to upgrade to a 8c16t like i7 10700

    • +3 votes

      This is a budget CPU to begin with. It'll do you fine for most games.

      •  

        fair enough

        • +2 votes

          You really need to have workload that benefits from 8c16t. CPU makers know people prefer 8c16t so they are not discounting those. However, honestly, if you really need high thread count, is 16t really enough?

          One annoyance with 3300X and 3500X is that you would pair it with low cost m/b (i.e. A520), but that means you lose PCIe 4.0 x16 and PCIe 4.0 x4 (for the m.2 SSD). In a typical AMD way, AMD locked PCIe 4.0 out of A520 (the same way AMD locked B450, X470 our of PCIe 4.0 - think about it, Zen 2, Zen 3 CPUs support them). Probably okay for most people as it doesn't quite make sense to put a PCIe 4.0 x4 NVMe SSD on a system with 3300X / 3500X.

          For low thread count based usage, 3300X and 3500X are quite competitive. In fact, 3300X's higher clock over 3500X does allow it to beat in some benchmark due to being clocked higher….

          • +1 vote

            @netsurfer: The reason why I prefer 8c16 is because I want to future proof myself. I don't upgrade my PC very often. If the 4c8t is still relevant today after 7 years, 8c16t may also follow the same trend.

            •  

              @Homr:

              The reason why I prefer 8c16 is because I want to future proof myself

              That might turn out to be a wise move this time. Just keep in mind that it never has been, ever, for the last few decades; we always expected that higher core counts would become necessary enough to justify the extra cost, and they never did, not until literally 2 or 3 gens after we expected, every single time.

              Much better odds that a 6 core (or even 4 core / 8 thread) will be perfectly fine for quite a few years yet (with a trivial performance penalty, in only a very few games, at worst).

    •  

      The cores themselves aren't the same. Each core is realistically faster as it currently stands. IPC (Instructions per clock) are increasing year by year, as are clock speeds.
      So core for core, the 3300x could well perform better than the 4770.
      3300x is 3.8ghz/4.3ghz whereas the 4770 is 3.4ghz/3.9ghz.
      Which only exacerbates the generational improvements.

    • +1 vote

      The CPU market hasn't moved as quickly as the GPU and SoC market, especially while AMD was building up to Ryzen and Intel struggled with decreasing node size. The 4770 has held up spectacularly well.

      7 years still does give 25-50% more power while using 25% less energy and at half the cost. Which isn't bad for a mature market. Spending 4770 prices today gets you 8c, 16t (also a tonne more cache) and a pretty significant upgrade.

  • +3 votes

    Not sure about the upvotes, this price is only valid with a purchase of motherboard from the same site " For sale with complete system or Upgrade Kit (with AM4 motherboard) Only."

    •  

      pretty hard sell without the stock cooler too

      •  

        never mind, apparently it does come with it?

    • +1 vote

      its amd people just unconditionally upvote

      like the $500++ 5600x “deals”

  • +2 votes

    How does this compare to an i3 10100F for gaming? i3 + mobo should be about $190. Planning on pairing to a 1650 super for the 10yo.

    • +2 votes

      i3 10100F for gaming? i3 + mobo should be about $190

      Stick with the i3 then. It's a very similar CPU to this. Neither CPU is top-of-the-line, but it's surprisingly close to it, for the money. There certainly won't be a game it can't play, not for a decade or so at least.

  • +1 vote

    To think my i7-7700 which was once considered high-end has comparable performance to this. Leaps and bounds.

    • +1 vote

      Wait you serious, you telling me this is better than my 6700k?

      • +1 vote

        yep

      • +3 votes

        even the i3 10100f is better than your 6700K (and mine, for that matter). the 6700K is a 5-year old CPU so this shouldnt really be that groundbreaking…

        •  

          That's insane to me, I stopped following tech hardware development after building my pc and assumed not much progress was made other than Ryzen and the typical yearly releases.

      • +2 votes

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HUBjC5DpNRw
        overall closer to a sidegrade, so skip this.

      • +1 vote

        as long as you OC your 6700k that is as per vid.

      •  

        I upgraded from a 6600 (non-k, 4c/4t) to an R5-3600 after falling victim to the relentless BS being spewed by the AMD shills masquerading as YouTube reviewers - and, honestly, I can barely feel any improvement. I wish I were more sensible and stuck to my trusty 6600 for a few more years. It has found a new home in my sister's gaming rig, so all is not lost I guess.

        e.g. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=csFwlKgZCzM

        •  

          There are other advantages such as the 7nm process, uses less power and more efficient. You probably have a poor video card if you can't tell the difference.

        • +2 votes

          It's hard to escape the hype. You tend to lose touch with the fact that CPU performance growth is actually really slow, and the fastest CPU this gen is only truly like 5% to 10% faster than last gen.

          That's not really a noticeable improvement when actually gaming.

          It's been that way for years, and progress slows more every gen.

        • +1 vote

          I upgraded to a 3600 (more cores though) and found a significant difference with charts and even chrome.

          You probably won't notice much if you're not using that many threads. I still have my 6600k next to me and it's fine.

          Consider going a 5800x.

  • -3 votes

    Good price but you gotta fork our extra for cooler if you don't already have one.

  • +5 votes

    From the site:

    AMD Ryzen 3 3300X CPU 100-100000159MPK. ** Tray Version (no retail box). Australian stock, includes CPU Fan and 3 years warranty.

    Comes with a cooler.

  • +2 votes

    It came to $265.49 for the CPU and ASUS A520 motherboard shipped to NSW.

    •  

      My deal was A520 and Ryzen 5 3600 for $309 + $10 shipping, I think the extra cores would have been worth it for $55, games like Cyberpunk run much better on hex vs quad cores. You may have to upgrade again sooner.

  •  
  •  

    What's a tray CPU, and is the choice of motherboard fixed?

    •  

      It's not in a retail box.
      that also means u need to buy a CPU fan with heatsink.

      • +2 votes

        You did not read it properly

    •  

      Normally tray cpu means you just get the cpu in a plastic clear box without the heatsink.

      in this case, you get the cpu AND the heatsink, just not in the traditional retail packaging.

      •  

        Traditionally the tray cpu (sent in only a tray full of CPUs) is sent to OEM manufacturers to place in their computers which use their own cooling system. Hence no cooling fan coming with a tray CPU. This is different from the norm when it comes to tray CPU that it's with the AMD cooler. It must be for small OEM.