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Lexar Professional 1667x 128GB SDXC UHS-II Card $62.68 + $7.10 Delivery ($0 with Prime) @ Amazon UK via AU

90

This seemed like an ok price for a 128gb UHS II SDXC.
Delivery without prime $7.10. Fulfilled by Amazon UK.

Description from Amazon:

Description
Whether you’re a professional photographer, videographer, or enthusiast, Lexar Professional 1667x SDXC UHS-II card Make it easy to quickly capture and transfer 1080P full-HD, 3D, and 4K video. This card leverages UHS-II technology (UHS Speed Class 3 (U3)) to deliver high-speed performance—up to 250MB/s (1667x). this dramatically accelerates workflow from start to finish. For versatility, this card also works with UHS-I devices at UHS-I speeds, and they’re backwards compatible with older cameras and readers, performing at class 10 speeds when used with non-UHS devices. Card also come with a limited lifetime warranty.

Features & details
Get high speed performance with UHS II technology (U3) for a read transfer speed up to 250MB/s (1667x), up to 120MB/s write
Captures high quality images and extended lengths of stunning 1080P full HD, 3D, and 4K video with a DSLR camera, HD camcorder, or 3D Camera
Large capacity options up to 256GB let you enjoy shooting longer without changing cards
High speed file transfer from card to computer to dramatically accelerate workflow
Backwards compatible with UHS I devices.Limited lifetime

Price History at C CamelCamelCamel.

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closed Comments

  •  

    For most people, its not.

    There are shockingly few devices with the extra contacts required to use advanced uhs speeds.

    Much better with 'high endurance' from any brand, or just samsung cards, where the write speed is steady (and fast) unless you know you have a special UHS device.

    Just an fyi for the less nerdy.

    • +3 votes

      I like to kindly disagree here.

      A lot 4k cameras benefit from higher write speeds, and this trend is going to continue with higher frame rate options releasing.

      Then again I can't think of other devices that will benefit from this, as you mentioned

      • -6 votes

        What 4K camera writes at over 30MBps? Thats over 240'000kbps!

        To that effect, what camera writes at over class10? Which is 80'000kbps?

        Most high frame rate (60+) cameras recommend 50-65Mbps for 4k; lots of people like to bump that to 70Mbps; which is still in spec for a good Class10 (by almost 15% headroom!) Halve that demand for the "cinematic 24fps" crew.

        Also, which cameras have UHS-II pins inside, compared to MicroSD pins?

        Fast microSD cards are more than enough without needing UHS speeds for most things yet. Gopro and DJI have been managing for years.

        4k is certainly not enough to need more than class10 sustained writes.

        Though, as an example where it IS used; my old works 3d terrain scanner used to use UHS cards, but we'd write a few hundred MB a second, 3D mapping mines.

        Seriously, put a bore-scope into your SD slot; I bet whatever you're thinking of doesnt have UHS pins.

        For reference; heres a UHS card in full size sd (because its easier to see) next to an sd card.

        https://cdn.mos.cms.futurecdn.net/2jnp7XEHxdFkzBQcZFMaC-970-...

        Id take a fast rated microSD card any day, over one that needs UHS to achieve its speeds claimed, like this one.

        • +5 votes

          Bought a GH5 in 2017 that shoots internal 10-bit 422 4K at 400 Mbps. Have another camera (G9) that shoots full res RAW photos in burst mode at up to 60fps. That's a lot of data!

          • -2 votes

            @Haptic Feedback Man: And it does that reliably on SD? Thats impressive.

            Can I see the UHS pins inside the slot? Or just a datasheet please?

        •  

          People negging this, aren't data storage professionals.

          • +1 vote

            @MasterScythe: I think my R5 disagrees with you…

            •  

              @danzster: I have an Olympus and slot 1 takes uhs-ii, so I wanted to try it out to see how much difference it makes. I'm thinking high speed burst and high res shots, and just viewing should be faster.
              I find stats to be a bit misleading at times (I consider it the aldi effect - similar or better features, but more often inferior) so I'm keen to see if there is a perceivable real world difference.

              •  

                @yogo: i'm with you yogo…

                just slightly disagreeing with master stating that that my device wont be able to take advantage of the UHSII speeds…

                although, i think the same card (few months ago, was selling the 256Gb version for ~$75 back in December 2020.

                Snapped one up back then, so probably wont pull the trigger on this one.

              •  

                @yogo: Perfect!
                As I said!
                "unless you know you have a special UHS device."

                Keen to know the difference you're able to benchmark :)

            •  

              @danzster: What part would it like to disagree with?
              It sounds like it falls into EXACTLY what I said.
              "unless you know you have a special UHS device."

              Does it NOT do UHS? What part is it disagreeing with?

              Regardless, Keen to be educated.
              What speed above 80Mbps does your R5 write to an SD card reliably?
              Can you share some burst data benchmarks?

              I've only ever shot on RED cameras in the last few years, which uses dedicated SSD's, which you have to crack custom firmware onto to replace.
              Yuck.

              Just since my job is currently based around data storage and transfer bus standards, I was unaware that common consumer cameras were recording above V30 (240 Mbps) just for 4K.
              As I said, 'Most' wont benefit, not nobody; but it seems like little johnny with his first point and shoot, can expect UHS pinouts to be standard now?

        • +2 votes

          UHS-II became main stream since 2014 in cameras. Not just pixel monsters but also mid range cameras around that period, apsc (Fujifilm xt1 and xt2) as well as MFT (Olympus omd em5 ii).

          Can I see the UHS pins inside the slot? Or just a datasheet please?

          That’s like saying I should not believe my laptop CPU has 8 cores because the data sheet said so ;-)

          •  

            @Buy2Much:

            That’s like saying I should not believe my laptop CPU has 8 cores because the data sheet said so ;-)

            No no, the opposite.
            I'm saying I'll believe the datasheet. I'm really curious to see the pinout, and how its communicating to the image processor.
            I'm very intersted. (that said, people DO mistake threads for cores…. like I believe people in the camera world are confusing CLASS with BUSes)

            But it sounds like your camera falls into EXACTLY what I initially said;
            "unless you know you have a special UHS device."

            UHS-II became main stream since 2014 in cameras. Not just pixel monsters but also mid range cameras around that period, apsc (Fujifilm xt1 and xt2) as well as MFT (Olympus omd em5 ii).

            Thanks for that info, I have a few cameras I've picked up that are newer than that though; and they're all missing UHS pins.
            They CLAIM 'UHS compatible' to stop the illiterate from assuming their UHS cards won't work; but most are lacking the pins needed to achieve the speed increase.


            I'm honestly not sure WHAT the people above are disagreeing with me for; I said 'Unless you have a UHS device'.
            It's literally a technical fact, you NEED the UHS interface, to achieve UHS speeds.
            Is the camera scene a bit like the Audiophile scene? "I like to think it's better, who cares if it's scientifically possible?"

            In all seriousness; why are people disagreeing with the fact that UHS speeds don't beneift non-UHS devices?
            Or that speeds above 30MBps (v30) are not commonly expected on SD cards, or used for 4K (go pro for example only records at 100Mbps, and DJI at 150Mbps)?

            • +4 votes

              @MasterScythe: Come on, is this even a discussion?

              Just the read speed to get data off is well worth it. We have all these nice USB 3.0 and up interfaces it is a chore to move UHS-I files now I have been using UHS-II.

              Not to mention it clears your camera's buffer much faster whether you're taking videos and photos.

              Saying UHS-II isn't for your average Joe is an understatement because

              1. Having to wait for your camera to respond is fustrating. Especially after you took some continuous stills at your son's missed goal attempt only to miss the second attempt but successful goal right after.
              2. Anyone with a pro/semi pro would like to geek out and what's better than more speed? Tangible speed at it especially when you're offloading footage or photos.

              And of course anyone doing paid gigs would also benifit from this, overall it's a win.

              Now is this card reliable? Has Lexar improved? That's a debate I was looking for. Get this UHS-II isn't needed out if here.

              • -2 votes

                @Frankiijayy:

                Come on, is this even a discussion?

                Hear hear! couldn't agree more.
                No, it feels more like a classroom at this point.

                People are disagreeing with me about how UHS works, and unfortunately, they can bash their head on the keyboard all they want and dislike me all they want; it doesn't make them correct.
                People are treating UHS like it's a speed rating, rather than a connection standard (it's both, but they're symbiotic).
                IF they don't own UHS hardware, then they CANT benefit from UHS speeds, it's just pure FACT.
                And of then probably 50+ SD storage devices I own, ONLY camera's and 1 of my 7 card readers has the PHYSICAL REQUIREMENTS to use the speed.

                It's a special type of rating, which requires a physically UHS enabled device.

                My initial statement is true;
                Unless you own a UHS enabled device, the speed ratings are bogus, and most people, do not.
                If you do, awesome!

                People are just mad when facts don't line up with what they had assumed, before studying.

                • +1 vote

                  @MasterScythe: Hey mate,

                  You seem like a very intelligent person, and seem to be right about many things.

                  You also seem to spend a lot of time on this website based on the 5k+ comments you made.

                  I only have one question, do you have a partner? like are you in a long term happy relationship?

                  There's a reason why I asked that, but I'll respond when you let me know :)

                  • +1 vote

                    @Ausdave: I have been extremely happy with my relationship status for over a decade.
                    Why do you ask?

                    • +1 vote

                      @MasterScythe: That's awesome mate!!

                      I just have a little a personal observation I've made of you based on your replies here.

                      Do you respond in this manner to your partner, friends, and colleagues? How do you they react?

                      If it's positively then all power to you mate.

                      I'm not going to respond/comment any further in this deal, and I don't think any of the above people will also, enjoy your evening :)

                      • +1 vote

                        @Ausdave: Yes, to all the above :)
                        I honestly wouldn't keep company of people who aren't truthful, or would try to argue feelings, over hard science.
                        My friends, relationship, and work ethic, are all based on honesty. Sometimes the truth is hard, but those close to you always appreciate it.

                        I guess that's why this thread is frustrating,
                        a VXX SD card will be faster than a UHS-XX card, unless you have a UHS enabled device; And most 4K recording is perfectly possible at well below 30MBps (gopro for example, is 12.5MBps/100mbps); which is what I initially said that started all this.
                        I can buy the fastest SATA3 SSD on the planet, but if I'm connecting it to a SATA2 port, it's not going to be any faster. Ditto SD ClassX vs UHS-XX; the connector\controller matters.
                        These cards (Lexar, especially) have been known to be suspect; because they'll often use their UHS pins to achieve V ratings, which isn't within the standard for labeling (but they're poorly policed).

        •  

          Hi there, just want to clarify some stuff.

          What 4K camera writes at over 30MBps? Thats over 240'000kbps!

          To that effect, what camera writes at over class10? Which is 80'000kbps?

          Most high frame rate (60+) cameras recommend 50-65Mbps for 4k; lots of people like to bump that to 70Mbps; which is still in spec for a good Class10 (by almost 15% headroom!) Halve that demand for the "cinematic 24fps" crew.

          An entry level camera such as the Sony A6100 can record at up to 4k 25fps at 100mbps but requires the card to be U3 or better or it will not record at this setting. Even if a card that can happily write at 80 MBps all day but does not have the U3 specification is used the camera will refuse to start recording at this setting. I'm going to assume better cameras such as the Sony A7S3 have only higher requirements for higher settings such as 4k 60fps and wouldn't be surprised that it requires something like a V60 card to record.

          Also, which cameras have UHS-II pins inside, compared to MicroSD pins?

          This is the wrong comparison. There are UHS-I SD cards. There are also UHS-II SD cards like this Lexar posted by OP. Then there are UHS-I micro SD and UHS-II micro SD cards. However to answer the question, the Nikon Z5 has dual UHS-II slots and pretty much every camera at its price and above has at least 1 UHS-II slot and sometimes XQD slots for even faster storage.

          Id take a fast rated microSD card any day, over one that needs UHS to achieve its speeds claimed, like this one.
          Thanks for that info, I have a few cameras I've picked up that are newer than that though; and they're all missing UHS pins.
          They CLAIM 'UHS compatible' to stop the illiterate from assuming their UHS cards won't work; but most are lacking the pins needed to achieve the speed increase.

          Any relatively modern device can take advantage of UHS-I speeds, eg Canon M50, Nintendo Switch, which means if a UHS-II SD card (or UHS-II micro SD card in the case of the Nintendo Switch) is inserted it will run at UHS-I speeds. Considering how many of these devices are floating around they aren't really considered to be "special UHS devices" if you ask me. Your cameras are likely UHS-I compabtible and are not missing "UHS pins" which I believe you might be referring to as the additional row of pins required for UHS-II operation.

          Feel free to correct me.

  • +1 vote

    Cheaper here: https://www.flashtrend.com.au/lexar-128gb-sd-card-sdxc-uhs-i...

    Although with shipping it might not be. Still prefer an Australian store.

  •  

    Amazon feedback suggests write speed is only 90MB/s so no better than UHS-I.

  •  

    aaahhh damn! not microSD.
    Saw this and was thinking of slot it into the notebook as a +1 HDD!

    Need to find a cheap (reliable) large MicroSD… back to the search for me…

    •  

      This card was only 128GB anyway, not sure if it's worth it for your use case as a HDD alternative.
      As much as I'm not a huge fan of Sandisk, their PRO range has proven to be pretty reliable in high-write environments.

      https://www.amazon.com.au/Sandisk-Extreme-microSDXC-Lifetime...
      $68.40 for 256GB isn't too bad.
      But going larger only increases your dollar per GB value.
      Don't drop to the 'extreme' range, stay with the 'extreme pro'. The $10 extra is worth it, if only for the better binned chips.

      While the Xrays I've seen is old by todays standards (about 2009); that little boost in speed used to be provided by a larger SLC buffer (or in chips this small, possibly TLC instead of QLC); but that's an educated guess; if someone knows for sure what the memory technology layout is, please inform us :)

      •  

        Thanks Master, pretty covered with the card differences etc.
        It's really only to be used as a bin drive on the notebook, as the HDD in the notebook is already full at 1TB (Intel Optane SSD).

        The extreme range is fine. That's what's being used now (128gb Extreme). That too is almost full now.

        Thanks for the note though and looking to assist. Only want to buy when there is a reasonable deal on offer.

        Found these guys too: https://www.memoski.com/products/copy-of-sandisk-extreme-pro...

        Not sure if they are legit though… $65 with free shipping. for the 256 Pro

        •  

          $3 more for the genuine ExtremePro in comparison, seems worthwhile, no?

          •  

            @MasterScythe: Sure. I was pointing out that momoski may or may not be legit. I'd imagine that the site is.

            $3 or not, it seems to have some reasonable pricing on there. Never seen it prior to today. Interesting…

            •  

              @mickyb80: Memoski are one of the sellers on amazon, with a good rating; so I assume their store at least is genuine. A great many confirmed sales.

              Catch would be; jump onto WD's website and see if they're an official seller.

              Thats what the extra $3 from amazon is getting you; "amazon" is a certified reseller with sandisk stock straight from WD.

              •  

                @MasterScythe: Thats a fair comment. Noting, as previously an 'authorised' premier reseller of WDC and many other products some years ago, they may not be listed. Anyone with an Ingram, Synnex or Leader account and ABN can be a legit reseller. :)

                This looks like a reasonable offer too: https://www.ozbargain.com.au/node/640211

                •  

                  @mickyb80: The evo series has proven themselves reliable for sure.

                  Im on my phone, otherwise id do it myself:
                  But its worth checking the endurance rating if you intend to use it as scratch.

                  That was always the 'pro' advantage in the sandisk line (which further suggests tlc instead of qlc on microsd)

  •  

    Don’t buy this card. Lexar have a very high fail rate. Stick with Sandisk or ProGrade.