out of stock Breville BCG820BSS The Smart Grinder Pro - $159.20 (C&C or Free Shipping eBay Plus) @ Bing Lee eBay

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  • +6 votes

    For anyone wondering, yes it is worth it. This + Aeropress + fresh coffee = great coffee for $200. Alternatively if you have a decent espresso machine this is the cheapest decent option, and anything better is going to cost you an arm and a leg.

    •  

      I have started to make Aeropress coffee at work instead of buying from a coffee shop. What coffee grind, hot water and milk ratio do you use?

      •  

        The Aeropress is a lot less finicky with grinder settings than an espresso machine, which is nice. When I use my Aeropress, I grind around 17g of coffee, fairly coarse (around 40, but depends on the beans).

        I use my Aeropress inverted. First fill just enough to cover the beans, give it a little stir. Then fill up around half (with plunger at (4), fill to (2)). Leave for 90 seconds, then plunge slowly (around 20 seconds). Top up with hot water. My coffee to milk ratio is 1 part coffee to 0 parts milk ;)

        I know there are some people that use crazy complicated recipes involving measuring the amount of water down to the gram, temperature to the degree, etc., but to me the whole point of the Aeropress is that it's simple. So I don't really bother with a "recipe" as such.

        Two things you should be particular about, though, are fresh beans and not boiling water. Forget the supermarket stuff - they're months old and stale by the time they even go on the shelf. Get something fresh roasted - I recommend BeanBay as they're pretty cheap, reliable, and great quality. They roast to order. Using boiling water is a big no-no as it will make the coffee bitter. You want around 85 degrees which is around when bubbles start forming.

    •  

      May I trouble you for some aeropress grinder settings please?

      •  

        The Aeropress is a lot less finicky with grinder settings than an espresso machine, which is nice. When I use my Aeropress, I grind around 17g of coffee, fairly coarse (around 40, but depends on the beans).

        I use my Aeropress inverted. First fill just enough to cover the beans, give it a little stir. Then fill up around half (with plunger at (4), fill to (2)). Leave for 90 seconds, then plunge slowly (around 20 seconds). Top up with hot water. My coffee to milk ratio is 1 part coffee to 0 parts milk ;)

        I know there are some people that use crazy complicated recipes involving measuring the amount of water down to the gram, temperature to the degree, etc., but to me the whole point of the Aeropress is that it's simple. So I don't really bother with a "recipe" as such.

        Two things you should be particular about, though, are fresh beans and not boiling water. Forget the supermarket stuff - they're months old and stale by the time they even go on the shelf. Get something fresh roasted - I recommend BeanBay as they're pretty cheap, reliable, and great quality. They roast to order. Using boiling water is a big no-no as it will make the coffee bitter. You want around 85 degrees which is around when bubbles start forming.

  •  

    Now if they would just put up the BES920 at a great price.

  •  

    What's the lifespan on these guys?
    I actually have one and it's very good but it's a few years old now, still seems to work OK though. (Just wondering if I need a spare. :) )

    • +1 vote

      I have the earlier model still going strong after 5 years with no issues other than modding it with shims so I can get a finer grind (something they fixed in this newer model)

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      This deal also pops up every month or two. I know you can ask Bevilles for a shims kit.

    •  

      Well my BCG800 gave up the ghost after about 4 years of mostly weekend only use - not the plastic impeller though! Turns out (after forking out for a replacement printed impeller :( ) that it was the nylon gear in the motor that gave way. I've since replaced that with a cheapie 3D print too and it's working again. But in that time bought a BCG820 at this typical deal price so using that for now.

      But the concerning thing is it looks like it could happen again with the BCG820 because even though they made the impeller metal, the gear issue can still happen it seems:
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KNICfdfTr6Q&feature=youtu.be
      (my BCG800 fault was exactly like this)

      •  

        I would imagine the nylon gear is so that if the motor jams the gear will be stripped rather than burning out the motor

      •  

        I basiclly had that exact issue with my BCG820 after about 3 months. Bing Lee replaced it no questions asked. You have to spend a lot more to get better performance, but the build quality isnt great. Ill be surprised if I dont have to get another one replaced before the 2 years is up.
        I actually wish Breville would add $100 to the cost, make it better quality and put a 5 year warranty on it.

        •  

          I returned 2 of these before getting a refund.

          The person at HN told me that he sees a lot of them returned because they stop working after not very long.

    •  

      My grinder has been running some 5 years or so.

      A pity the BES900/920 do not last that long

      • +1 vote

        Yeah, i decided to go with an EM7000 over the dual boilers. my aim was to be able to steam and pour coffee at same time, which EM7000 does with twin thermoblock. boilers seem to require more maintenance & those brevilles don't have the best reputation for longevity.

  •  

    anyone have an error where it says "This code can't be applied to your order" at checkout?

  •  

    Hows this compare to the Baratza Encore?

    •  

      The Baratza doesn't have fine enough grind settings to grind for espresso, but this machine does. I'd go with this one over the encore

      •  

        Thanks mate. Just looking to get a Chemex for pour over, so the fine setting isn't too much of a big deal. At this price its cheaper than the Baratza, and looks nicer so this might be the goer

    •  

      If you're only making filter, baratza is easier to repair.

      •  

        Good point. I only want to use it for a chemex, and i'd rather spend a bit more over a manual grinder. This ones also more attractive and cheaper than the baratza. This will only be used a few times a week if that. Thanks!

        •  

          Fair enough! I got the encore as I can upgrade it to the virtuoso in terms of quality by swapping out a burr.

  • +1 vote

    Can also recommend this grinder. Can be a bit of a stretch for espresso, although I believe after I got mine they made some changes so it'll grind finer, but for Aeropress or Pourover at home they work very well. I have one at home & one at my desk in the office. The one at the office struggles with some of my home roasted beans that are a touch too dense, but I've never had a problem with commercial roasts.

    •  

      struggles with some of my home roasted beans that are a touch too dense

      rubbish

      •  

        What makes you think he's lying? He recommended the grinder after all

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          I meant the statement around bean density making the grinder struggle. The only time it would do that is if you are throwing under-roasted / green beans into it, which actually make sense when they point out there is no issue with commercial roasts. Point is, this grinder is sufficiently powerful to handle all types of coffee beans regardless of density (if you get the roast right).

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          @chemax: fair enough.. that's consistent with my experience.

    •  

      Can be a bit of a stretch for espresso, although I believe after I got mine they made some changes so it'll grind finer,

      When first released there were issues at fine grind settings - if you wrote to Breville they'd send out a shim kit for the lower burr set which would bump the fineness up. Since then there have been a couple of iterations to the design and it produces a consistent espresso grind without any issues.

  •  

    Last time they took almost 2 weeks to deliver, citing high orders and low stock.

  •  

    I've got a manual Breville conical grinder that I've been using for nearly 10 years and getting consistent shots with it. Would you guys recommend upgrading to this?

  •  

    when you buy fresh coffee beans…do you just put them all in on the top of the grinder?
    what's the best way?

    put enough for 1 weeks coffee beans in only and FREEZE the remaining in a sealed bag?
    (only drink 2 cups of coffee a day)

    • +1 vote

      I put 3 days in at a time. Rest go in the bag they came in. Freezing didn't work on my experience, water gets in through condensation.

    •  

      When you're not going through them quickly, I find it's best to just put in the amount you need each time you turn it on. I make 1 cup/day at home and this method will just get me through a 1kg bag before it dries out too much.

      Split the bag of beans into multiple air tight containers so that you don't keep opening the full bag each time you top up. Keep them in a cool, dark place.

      If you do freeze the beans, you need to let them come back to room temp in a sealed bag/container so that condensation forms on the outside of the container instead of on the beans which would cause the grinder to gum up.

      •  

        How much are you using for 1 cup a day?

        •  

          I'm not sure by weight sorry. I use the double basket in the BES920 and for that it's about 1.3 scoops using the scoop that comes with the Aeropress. I'll try to remember to weigh it on the weekend and get back to you.

        •  

          @3: Hey thanks man, I appreciate it. I'm new to this stuff, I'm currently only a peasant who drinks Moccona

        •  

          @3: 1.3 scoops should be about 13g in my experience.

        •  

          @kaneissik: works out to closer to 20g of whole beans into the grinder. I think the recommendation is about 18g but probably varies a little with beans.

        •  

          @3: Thanks for the info!

      •  

        If you do freeze the beans, you need to let them come back to room temp in a sealed bag/container so that condensation forms on the outside of the container instead of on the beans

        It still forms inside the container because of the moisture that was in the bag when you sealed it.

        Freezing beans isn't the best way to store them as coffee is hygroscopic so it will absorb moisture and flavours from things around it.

        When you're not going through them quickly, I find it's best to just put in the amount you need each time you turn it on

        Is better to only buy what you need.

        Buy an amount that will last you a week. There's no need to put coffee in the grinder daily.

        •  

          I buy 2 kgs at a time and use the foodsaver to vac seal the beans into 200gm portions and then put in the vegetable tray at bottom of the fridge. I find this works pretty well, not as good as buying fresh weekly but I have to get the beans sent by post save it saves hassle for me. This method does preserve them better than just keeping them in a non-airtight container. Tbh I dont know if the fridge makes any difference, but I assumed it would and Its a convenient place. But the vac seal stops the beams absorbing smells and i think slows down any deterioration.

  •  

    Have this grinder for espresso. Works great

    •  

      I dont have this grinder so I can't confirm

      •  

        Let me confirm then…. It's awesome for espresso as I have one

        It's useful you can dial in your grind time and it'll dose to your liking

  •  

    I don't have a machine (maybe one day) but I'm more a french press kind of guy and I purchased one of these on the last deal for exactly the same price and all I can say that this is 150% worth it for coffee lovers. I buy premium roasted coffee beans and go through a 1kg bag in about 2 weeks, LOL.

  •  

    How would this compare to a Macap M2M ?

  •  

    Does anyone have recommendations for a cheap coffee machine to go with this? I have no idea about these things I'm getting them as a gift set for someone who's wanted a set for ages. I bought this grinder now need a coffee machine that's a couple hundred or so on sale with the milk frothing thing? Thanks!

  •  

    Brilliant grinder. I’ve had mine for a couple of years now. Some shops use them for the likes of decaf.

  • +1 vote

    I have the barista express, is it worth getting this grinder?

    • +1 vote

      If you’re currently using preground or anything less consistent than a conical burr, then definitely. It will upgrade your coffee game. You will need to change from a double wall to single wall if you want the best results though

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