Intel i7 8700 RTX 2080 8GB 120GB SSD 16GB RAM 550W Gaming Desktop Computer PC $1899 Delivered @ eBay Techfast

131
P5OFF

There were few requests in past for 16GB RAM on high-end systems so requested rep luketechfast if they can provide similar config so here I got this one to share. Feel free to reach out to him if any queries :)
Its good price imo and combine with 5% ebay GC cards if you still got few left. Enjoy :)

Base Specifications:

  • Case: TechFast Leaper PRO RGB Case (Mid-tower size with multi-cycle front RGB strip)
  • Case Fans: 2x 120mm Front Fan
  • Power Supply: 550W Power Supply
  • Motherboard: B360 Motherboard
  • System Cooling: Intel Stock Cooler
  • Processor: Intel Core i7 8700 Hexa Core Processor (3.2GHz Base Clock - 4.6GHz TurboBoost)
  • Graphics Card: Single GALAX NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 8GB Dedicated Graphics Card
  • Memory: 16GB DDR4 2400MHz RAM (2 x 8GB)
  • Operating System: Not Included; see PC Upgrades section below
  • Primary Drive: 120GB Solid State Drive
  • Warranty: 12 Month Return To Base Warranty and lifetime phone support

Original P5OFF 5% off Sitewide on eBay Deal Post

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Comments

  • +1 vote

    Must…hold..out…until next year

    •  

      sorry, meant to upvote. Why won't Ozbargain let me change my vote after a few hours :/

    •  

      Seen the rumours for amd 7nm and Navi? If they're even close to legitimate it's going to be insane value

      • +2 votes

        Although I run a full AMD system and my last Nvidia product was a 7800gtx in about 2005, I've learned never to take anything from performance leaks. Every leak talks about the amazing performance. Every leak leads to disappointment.

        Although I do agree with the "wait for 7nm" strategy if you care about your budget. The RTX line up is pretty shameful and you can be sure NVidia won't be far behind AMD to 7nm if you prefer team green. RTX 2080ti is the only card that makes any sense and that's just for the more money than I know what to do with crowd.

        Lots of great bargains on 580s and 1060s in the mean time if you need something to tide you over until 7nm.

      • +1 vote

        Seen the rumours for amd 7nm and Navi?

        Ryzen 3000 series looks genuinely exciting. I think Ryzen is the best thing to have happened in a long time. Whilst Intel were basically stagnating their consumer chips with 4 cores and incrementally increasing the core count in their HEDT chips, Ryzen has really forced their hand.

        Regardless of whether you prefer AMD or Intel, Ryzen has been amazing. It's offered a great value incentive and even if you prefer Intel (e.g. for the higher single threaded performance or higher clocks), Ryzen has made Intel improve their offerings too.

        GPUs on the other hand have been a complete flop from AMD. The R9 290/290X were the last good high-end release. Since then, I'd say that the Fury lineup was a disaster compared to the 980/980 Ti and Vega 56/64 weren't really competitive with the 1070/1080 either. The only card from AMD worth buying is the RX 570/580, but even then, for some reason, they're not as popular as the 1060.

        •  

          AMD does very well in the mid-low high end performance wise. They just have an unfortunate stigma attached to them, that their cards are lower quality.

          Not at all helped by the fact they aren't taking on Nvidia in the high end, just the low/mod/low high, their high power draws and the generally garbage stock designs.

          Annoys me, because AMD typically has better performance for as much/less but can't take advantage of that due to games typically optimising for Nvidia. What's worse is the fact they have freesync, which is priced very well compared to Gsync, which is typically priced so high you'd be bettet off just buying a better graphics card.

          •  

            @N1NJ4W4RR10R:

            AMD does very well in the mid-low high end performance wise. They just have an unfortunate stigma attached to them, that their cards are lower quality.

            I think it's that they're constantly playing catch up and never really beat Nvidia. Say you take Vega 56/64, which are around a 1070/1080 respectively without any discount really. By the time they're released, those who just wanted a better card would have already bought Nvidia and those who waited out (like me) just got an Nvidia card on sale because they'd been on the market for ages by that point (not to mention also available used…etc.)

            The stigma about their cards being lower quality is partly their fault. They basically put leafblowers on their R9 290/290X and again with their Vega lineup, whereas the Nvidia stock coolers genuinely look good and perform well.

            Completely agree with you about Freesync.

    • +4 votes

      And they are banking on the price falls and collecting interst.

      Sure, if you wanted it earlier and don't want to wait, then I'm on your side. They should be transparent with the delivery times.

      But come on, you made a good point and followed it up with a glaringly ridiculous assertion. What do you mean by they're banking on price falls? The price may well go up, so that makes no sense unless they're gambling. Secondly, what you purchased was $800, the interest on that over one month is $2 assuming a 3% rate. It's a pretty dumb business model if you ask me, so I doubt that's what they're doing.

      •  

        I dont think the RTX 2080 with ryzen 2600 was ever $800 btw lowest i think it was $1359.

        • +1 vote

          Ah, my bad, I thought he was referring to the RX 580, but either way, at $1359, the interest would be like what? $3.50 or so? The point still stands, in my opinion.

  •  

    I noticed this deal comes with 2 front fans but mine only comes with one, should i be worried in terms of keeping the system cool? If so i should probably buy an extra fan? Or maybe just an cooling system.

  • +2 votes

    Hmm So

    $1229 for 2080
    $530 for i7 8700
    $150 for motherboard

    Total $1909… Not bad I guess if you are looking for a 2080 system. Still, it would need a good water cooling system for CPU and more drives. PLus, a 550w power supply would probably just barely be enough if overclocked.

  •  

    If you do buy this expect long wait times. Mine was estimated to deliver today (bought on the 17th) but they have not even sent it to startrack for shipping yet.

  •  

    Just wait for the next ryzen offerings next year, would probably stomp this into the ground

  • +1 vote

    These guys are hard to deal with if you expect any level of customer service - they generally won't respond to any messages sent on ebay, so if buying be prepared for a really long wait despite what estimated delivery time says.

    Otherwise if you're patient and fine with no communication this would be a good deal

  •  

    Say the power supply is 80% efficient, that leaves 440 watts to power the system, is that enough for these components? What capacitors are used in the power supply? Wouldn't a bigger than 550w no name PS be more sensible?

    • +1 vote

      I think you should stick to quality over quantity/capacity with power supploes, especially in custom PCs.

    •  

      Yeah never ever ever get a no brand power supply, ever. Not even remotely worth the risk for such a cheap item.

      Edit: wait you're saying this IS a no name power supply? Rep please clarify. If this is a no brand supply id swap it out IMMEDIATELY. Risking a nearly $2000 system on a $40 PSU is beyond insanity.

      On a side note, 440w will be perfect. No headroom for SLI of course, but who cares =p 250w for the gpu and about 65w for the CPU. Plenty of leeway.

      •  

        As stated in the ebay listing these are the brands that can be in the system, Majority: Allied, TechFast-approved Occasionally: Thermaltake

      •  

        This will be the Allied PSU, covered by a 2 year warranty, warrrantable through us as the sole distributor. The 750W PSU Upgrade through PC Upgrades in the listing is Thermaltake Litepower or similar.

      • +6 votes

        Not even remotely worth the risk for such a cheap item.

        This is so silly behaving like power supplies are killing computers all the time.

        •  

          Agreed, it seems a little over blown. Would I buy one? No, but I've probably believed the hype like everyone.

          Never heard of a psu failure and I'm 36.

          •  

            @scuderiarmani: Power supplies are the main failure in a PC, especially after a few years. The cheap capacitors are a big part of that. Any other hardware failure is negligible statistically. (Obviously mechanical hard drives die after their eol)

        • +3 votes

          https://forums.whirlpool.net.au/archive/764486

          Shaw/no name psu. Plenty of examples.

          Do they fail ALL the time, no. Would I save $50 on a PSU on a $2000 computer? No.

        •  

          Cheap power supplies blow all the time, they do take out the rest of the computer more often than not.

          • +2 votes

            @garetz: I don't think they would take out other hardware very often. I have changed heaps of power supplies(50+? it didn't happen that often) over the last 30 years and can't remember any with other hardware issues. It is usually that they don't turn back on.

            •  

              @Major Mess: Ive dealt with a similar number since the mid 80s, i agree it doesnt happen often, but when it did it was always a cheapie powersupply.

      • +3 votes

        Yeah never ever ever get a no brand power supply, ever. Not even remotely worth the risk for such a cheap item.

        Risk is nowhere near as large as what people say.

        Power supplies are one of the easiest components in a PC to manufacture. It's basically a rectifier with capacitors for smoothing. High school physics students make basic bridge rectifiers as lab experiments. I've been building computers since I was a primary school kid and I've never, ever seen a PSU "take out" other components. It's similar to the fear of static electricity killing components.

        I've come across heaps of computers professionally too, working as a technician building PCs when I was a student. Many returns for dead cheap PSUs, for sure. But again, I've never seen dead components due to a PSU.

        I've seen PSUs fail, blow up, have smoke coming out of them, the entire lot, but to say that them taking out components is just not true. There are merits to buying more premium power supplies, but don't believe the hype just to go out and put huge amounts of cash on a power supply that's only marginally better than your el-cheapo one.

      •  

        I used to do OK in the past, but was using a lot of limited manufacture, so had consistency and that was the 2000's and there were not so many "virtual" brands then. There was also not really any cheap name brands, just unknown Chinese brands or the like of Antec etc. I have been using and recommending high end power supplies for the last ten years though. Surely there are some OK cheapo units around? You would just have to find a couple of brands that you had a good history with if selling them.

    • +1 vote

      I received the PC today (2600+ rx580) it was ok but it shut down all of a sudden and i cant turn it on anymore might be the psu.. Sad

      •  

        Well damn dude… that sucks! Try to talk with luketechfast and let him know what happened. I think it definitely has to be the PSU but i am no expert.

      • -1 vote

        Hearing all these stories of really bad prebuilts make me wonder what kind of operation these guys are running lmao.. I mean you gotta cut corners somewhere but damn it feels like they have cut out whole parts or replaced them with gumtree bottom of the barrel run into the ground second hands maybe even fourth hands lol.

        My condolences hope you get it fixed out.

        •  

          Yeh this is the third one i think so far, i certainly hope there wont be anymore but at this rate i dont even know anymore.

    •  

      80+ bronze? Doesn't mean flat 80%, look it up on Wikipedia, at certain loads it'll be 90ish or a bit over iirc

    •  

      It works the other way. It will deliver the watts on the sticker, but will draw more from the wall.

      Also if you’re curious, PSU have varied load graphs. Some perform most efficient at 70-90% load etc

      •  

        Yep, of course. You add the different rails amp rating and get the result. I was more saying 80% to allow for how dodgy they could be. I should have mentioned the voltage rails amps rating anyway, which is the important spec, or is it anymore?

  •  

    so +$300 for the cpu upgrade over a i5-8400 and +$150 for extra 8gb ram.. am I reading this right?

    I know the i7-8700 is expensive but damn that is a lot of money for 30% increase in performance at most.

    •  

      Remember though its only 5% off, i got mine for $1799 which was at RRP of $1999 with 10% off code instead. Without codes these prices seem too much considering we aren't getting top of the line or even middle end components. A %15 or even 20% off code would really make this a great deal!

      •  

        Definitely this is at least a minimum $400 overpriced for me and even if it was $1500 AUD delivered I would still reconsider it.

        But that is mainly because of the $704 Ryzen 5 2600 / GTX 1060 6gb / 8gb ddr4 ram / 550 watt psu deals lately which are really great for value.

        If you look at the gpu performance vs how much you pay the performance scales perfectly but if you look at the cpu performance to what you pay the diminshing returns hit hard after the Ryzen 5 2600 imho maybe even after the i3-8100 but definitely a lot after the Ryzen 5 2600.

        •  

          True i really wanted to get one of those GTX 1060 deals instead but i had to go off and buy a more premium GPU wise system which i hope not to regret as long as the PC works without any issues. Now i am just looking for a cheap but good g-sync monitor and done, although i do have to save up some more money to do so. No rush though i got a full HD monitor to use thats around 4 years old, hopefully it still works.

          • +1 vote

            @firsttimeuser7: Investing in a better gpu is always a good choice imho because they age like fine wine and no one ever says "oh I wish I had x amount of clothes or food instead of an awesome cpu/gpu" haha or at least I wouldn't.

            Tech > food imho lol if I can trick my brain into doing it.

            Man thinking about how much I could pour into my baby instead of my belly makes me sad sometimes but I can't be stuffed building a new pc again anymore for awhile.. my current one took a lot of time and energy and the cpu/gpu isn't really upgradeable (HP Compaq 8200 elite sff aka tiny box but performance per how much room it takes it packs a very big punch i7-2600 / GTX 1050 Ti Low Profile / 32 gb ddr3 / a tonne of storage but honestly I want more haha lol if it can fit)

            •  

              @AlienC: This is my first ever PC so prebuilt seemed the way to go for me and especially through techfast because it seems like a good deal, i was thinking of getting those Dell Inspiron systems and last i checked a gtx 1060 system costed like 1599

          •  

            @firsttimeuser7: Its just these deals especially the Ryzen 5 2600 RTX 2080 for 1399 seemed like a killer of a deal to pass up and i actually bought that version first but refunded it due to other reasons but then i spent 400 more for the i7 8700 version and rebought it which does come with 750w psu and extra 1tb of storage. I figured 400 more for a little bit more future proof tech is something i was willing to pay at the time.

            •  

              @firsttimeuser7: Best I saw a GTX 1060 system in the past year was around the $1050 mark for just the tower alone no monitor maybe some peripherals like mouse and keyboard.

              I think below that was maybe some really barebones 1050 ti systems around the $700-800 mark.

              So considering you can get a Ryzen 5 2600 / GTX 1060 6gb system now for $700 is not bad but it will only get better.

              Probably looking at $500 versions of this system in another years time which would make awesome gaming pc's imho for what tech we have right now.

    •  

      I know the i7-8700 is expensive but damn that is a lot of money for 30% increase in performance at most.

      It depends how important that 30% is for you. When I was building up my system, an 8700K was around $550 or so, a 7960X was $2300, for a little better than double the performance.

      I wouldn't pay the difference if I was playing games, but when my simulations and models run in 3 hours vs. 7 hours, that's a difference between being able to see my results tonight and having to wait until the next morning.

      •  

        Definitely. I forgot to add that I was only talking from a gaming performance perspective with anything work related or income money earning related the small % boosts definitely pay off in the long run easily.

        But for a battlefield v machine the differences are costly.

      •  

        Isn't the Ryzen the better choice in that sort of application?

        • +1 vote

          Today I would consider the Threadripper 2990WX. Back then there was only the 1950X, sure it was a bit cheaper than the 7960X, but single threaded performance was much poorer. The 2990WX doubles the cores and closes the single thread gap significantly.

          I wouldn't consider mainstream Ryzen. The 2700X is about the same or a little faster than the 8700K.

          •  

            @p1 ama: Wouldn't that make it a more viable choice due to price gap?

            •  

              @N1NJ4W4RR10R: It depends on what you're after. When I built my work PC, I went with a 7960X because I needed that additional performance and the additional cost is not a huge deal to me.

              My home/gaming PC has a Ryzen 2700 because that's the best bang-for-buck CPU in my opinion (perhaps the 2600 is better now, but at the time it was priced much closer to a 2700 than now). My wife's PC has an Intel i5 8400 because she wanted a compact, quiet system and doesn't need discrete graphics. The i5 8400 is better than the 2400G for that use case.

              What I meant was that I wouldn't consider mainstream Ryzen for my own personal application. I support both Intel and AMD, competition leads to better products on both sides.

  •  

    Considering the gaming card you would probably want to budget for a 1TB SSD for you games installs. It would also make sense to upgrade the slow 120GB SSD for the OS as well.

    •  

      At that budget and price point? The OS SSD will be fine. A large storage drive and its great. If your gonna add $500 of components your looking in the wrong area imo

  •  

    Min requirement for a 2080 is 650W an given no details on PSU in this system other than 550W i would be careful.

    • +1 vote

      Glad mine came with 750w then if that is indeed the case! Although I have heard that a top end 450w would still work fine or 550w? Not sure about cheap ones that are not gold rated tho.

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