out of stock Synology DiskStation DS918+ Black $597 Delivered @ Amazon AU

880

Hi Guys ,
Posting my First Deal here. I have been keeping an eye on the price of Synology DS918+, wanting to upgrade from my DS214play.
Looks it's having a much much good deal on Amazon today. I am not a super fan of cashrewards, not sure if you could stack a cash back rebate from cashrewards further.

Last deal @Amazon was $671
https://www.ozbargain.com.au/node/425644

Price history at CamelCamelCamel.

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Comments

  •  

    hows this compare to a HP microserver?

    • i would have thought the microserver would be more flexible, but more work to configure?
    • +1 vote

      Sorry, I have no much clue, sir. I've been using Synology 2bay NAS for almost 4 years. Just wanting to upgrade to 4 bay due to the expansion of my data.

      So I would like to stick with Synology for easy migration\upgrade from my old NAS.

    • +6 votes

      Totally depends on your usage, wanna run a full blown OS on bare metal? Microserver

      Wanna just run Plex, Sonarr, Radarr, Jackett, Lidarr and have bulk file storage? DS918+ will do it pretty well if you chuck another 4GB RAM into it.

    •  

      Exactly as you say. Synology has nice software and makes it easy for basic stuff but if you want more flexibility and customization go with the HP.

      For example, I don't even have iostat on my Synology and it's a pain to get it whereas would be easy to self compile something on Solaris or *nix.

      •  

        Couple of questions

        Can I remote access the Nas without port forwarding?

        Can I put the nas to sleep mode/standby ? Without too much hassle?

        • +1 vote

          Yes the NAS makes all these things easy. That is the benefit of them and what you get in the trade off in exchange for less customisation.

      •  

        Can't you use resource monitor etc?

        •  

          The resource monitor in synology didn't break down into the detail I wanted at the time. I was having issues with 100% disk utilization and couldn't pinpoint what was thrashing the disk.

          Also there's other stuff like the io or cpu priority binaries that don't exist on synology. I wanted those for SABNZBD so that it wouldn't tie up my drives as heavily.

          Still pretty happy with Synology though.

      • +1 vote

        Back in the day, you could install quite a bit with ipkg. Not sure if it's still a thing with the more recent versions.

    • +1 vote

      If you are a bit tech savvy you can always build your own nas. HP microservers are very flexible. It can be cheaper/better to build an i3 machine. Take a look at xpenology. It's a free version of synology's OS.

      • +3 votes

        +1 for HP Microserver + Xpenology

        The HP Gen8 was effectively have a 4bay synology for less than $250 after Xpenology is installed.

        But only if you're prepared to do a little reading on forums every now and then regarding updates etc. and can follow simple instructions.

        • +2 votes

          I will have to look into this, just picked up the Gen8 microsever from work killing their offsite backup. Now got 12TB of reds to fill up

        • +2 votes

          Exactly what i was thinking, my "NAS" (HP Microserver) acts as a plex box, a mail server, it runs my home lab VMs, a web server AND my homes firewall, without even so much as a drop of sweat…

          and with the expandable card i could always install another 4-16 hdds externally fairly easily. Just seems crazy that people spend so much for a bit of software… (as the hardware can be had for much cheaper)

          heck even FreeNAS, is going to give you very similar functional but way more flexibility.

          that said, i did upgrade the RAM, and getting faster CPU for it…so it wasnt the base price i paid…

          •  

            @wisc: What OS are you using for the firewall? And is it running in a VM?

            •  

              @Lorindor: yep. VMs, running VMWare, with VMs on top, running "pfSense", easy enough to get going - basically download the ISO, mount it, and run though the installer.

              •  

                @wisc: How did you go with getting the NICs to pass through to pfSense? Also, I'm assuming you're using a PCI-e NIC card in addition to the onboard NICs?

                •  

                  @Lorindor: sorry for the late reply, just saw this now…

                  nope, the gen8 microserver comes with 2 nics (and a WOL port) so i didn't need to worry about a PCI-e NIC. I bought an add on RAID card so i can run 6 drives on in it…(Im using Centos NFS to pass back the RAID array to the host - as the PCI-e card isn't recognised by VMWare, but that's a whole 'nother issue)

                  I'm using one of the ports for a clean feed to my home network, the other is dirty from the net.

                  its pretty easy to pass them though from vSphere… My pfsense has two nic's passed though too it, you basically just tell pfsense, which one is the LAN and which one is the LAN then it basically does the rest of the set up, then basically all you do is create firewall rules…

                  my biggest issue/more complex part is that i didn't want the WOL port behind the firewall, so my modem/router also acts as a firewall (which means i have a firewall in front of a firewall which is a bit of a pain), I also wanted my wifi behind the firewall, so I've separated the LAN ports on the router into two networks using DDWRT, i have the WOL port and Dirty port plugged into ports 1/2 - network 1, the clean port plugged into port 3(Network 2), the internal switch plugged into port 4 (Network 2), the wifi is also on network 2.

                  if you do have a separate NIC, you should be able to do a pass though of the whole NIC, VMWare doesnt even need to support it, just needs to be able to see the hardware (as i'm doing with my RAID card)

                  •  

                    @wisc: All good.

                    I'm a bit confused by your setup to be honest, as I thought that pfSense required a minimum of two NICs (WAN & LAN), so I'm not sure how you're managing vSphere/ESXi with only the onboard ports on top of that.

                    I have an Intel PCI-e dual port card which I intended to use for a similar setup with my Gen8 MicroServer, although after a bit of research it appears that virtualizing a firewall isn't widely recommended due to security concerns (i.e pass-through of hardware to something that is connected to the big bad world).

                    •  

                      @Lorindor: Hey Lorindor,

                      you must have missed the first bit:

                      "nope, the gen8 microserver comes with 2 nics (and a WOL port)"

                      https://www.storagereview.com/images/StorageReview-HP-ProLia...

                      if you got a Gen 8 as well you should have 2 NICs on your main board, (and you don't need to pass the PCIe card though.) that said, if the VMWare supports the pci-e card nativly, again, you don't need to pass though…

                      •  

                        @wisc: I'm aware of the ports available as I own one myself, but that still doesn't explain how you have pfSense virtualized with two dedicated ports, as well as management of VMware with only two usable onboard NICs.

                        •  

                          @Lorindor: oh, management is though the clean port, its a home network, not like it needs a dedicated port/network just for management as you would in an enterprise environment…

                          basically router to microserver port 1, port 2 to internal network switch.

                          management of the Vmware host, though port 2. (its on the same network as my internal machines. (see Below:))

                          (not my actual addresses but you get the idea)

                          from memory:
                          x.x.1.1 main router.
                          x.x.1.2 dirty port for PFSENSE

                          x.x.2.254 pfsense (clean port - can manage pfsense.)
                          x.x.2.250 vmware Host (management thought clean port as its on the same network as all my PCs.)
                          x.x.2.100-200 DHCP addresses.
                          x.x.x.1-100 static IP addresses.

                          as I said its a home network, as long as its all behind the firewall, im good with that - as its behind both the router and PF sense.

                          (that said, i do have a virtual network for all my webservers, mail servers, ect, as they are all virtual, they its just a virtual network/switch on the VMWare host. so is like a third port for segregation of that network.)

                          Below:
                          it was something like each NIC is connected to a separate port group & vSwitch, then your management and clean networks are connected to the same vswitch.

                          •  

                            @wisc: Then as per above, I actually had a third vSwitch for my DMZ - virtual web server… and PFSense has a port on each of the vSwitches so it can route between them.

      •  

        Hp microservers have certification to run VMwares etc

    •  

      HP microserver cheaper, well mine were, not sure about newer models

      I run Unraid on my microservers and have docker and VM support so can run Dockers or Virtual OSs on it

      I can squeeze 7 drives 6x 4TB 3.5 and 1x 2.5 ssd into my microservers

      • +1 vote

        I have a HP N40L running unraid. I just had a quick search to see what the latest gen HP Microservers are worth, and wow - the game has totally changed. the cheapest i could see were like 650-700 (gen 8). There are HP N36, N40 and N54 going for 300+ on ebay! What happened in this space?

        •  

          I run 3 HP N40L's still running perfectly. I finally dumped Windows Home server of one and now have unraid 6.6.6 on all 3 of them running docker and VMs

          •  

            @asa79: Looks like there isn't much in the way of ready-to-run replacement hardware in the same price bracket unfortunately. If the hardware bombs out, it might be a custom build or an expensive replacement for these great little micro's

            •  

              @richox: I just sold my last N40L and replaced with an i5 quad core Optiplex from eBay for $100 during the sales. N36L, N40L, N54L cpu's bit too long in the tooth these days although you can still use them for lots of things and when they were on sale originally you could get them for $150 brand new

              Optiplex i5 throw in 16-32gb ddr3 desktop ram whatever you have laying around, dual port NIC for 30 dollars HP or Intel or Dell on ebay then run proxmox or esxi or xcp-ng its about 100x better than the microservers are. as long as you dont need to fill it with drives, it'll hold one 3.5" and 2 ssd's mostly

              I just fuse it to gsuite business and have unlimited cloud storage for 8 bucks a month with google

              • +1 vote

                @i7-2600k: Depends on what your after speed or power efficency
                My whole server cabinet runs at around 240w/h

              • +1 vote

                @i7-2600k: benefit of the microservers was the stupid low power consumption, if your just using them for a NAS they are ideal, even with the weak CPU… diminishing returns on upgrading due to the power cost differential…never underestimate the costs to run a server 24x7 over a year…

              •  

                @i7-2600k:

                its about 100x better than the microservers are

                Yeah I disagree, whilst a SFF consumer PC is more than capable of running as a basic home server, you really can't compare them to proper enterprise hardware.

                Efficiency (power usage) and the amount of heat/noise it produces is key for use in a house environment.

        •  

          cos of the US/China trade wars, + other trade wars, + manufacturing standards , + toxic waste standards + no more cheap children labour :(

    • +1 vote

      HP MicroServer G7 N54L was good value, post G8 MicroServers are no longer cost effective. Not worth buying unless working in the industry and self sufficient in DIY hardware as well as OSes (e.g. Linux).

      •  

        G10 was less than $460 last year … .missed out

        •  

          I bought the G7 N54L (which was killed last month by lightning spell) from Shopping Express back in 2014 for 229, so I was under the impression that those MicroServers (diskless) entry model should be under 300, stupid me…

          Will consider buying a G10 if I can get it for about 450. Not a big fan of those Synology NAS.

    • +1 vote

      Dont get me wrong these are great but the price point for only 4 disks is pretty high. Hopefully they start bringing out 8 disks units at this price

    •  

      This Syno does hardware transcoding for plex for x265/UHD content. That was the only reason I got a Syno to upgrade my Gen8. For any other use the Gen8 is perfect, but, yes, it requires more tinkering. If you want more plug and play (but with the option of still tinkering a significant amount) get the Syno box.

      •  

        That's the benefit of these, transcoding. The G1610T can only do a single 1080p Plex stream.

        I've been considering getting a Nvdia shield to take some load off this Gen8 after seeing lots of deals for the Shield recently, but I still don't reeeeeally need one.

        •  

          I picked up a Shield for the gamestream, which I found disappointing (it works, but is laggy). The Plex implementation is lightning fast, though. So much better than the plex app in the TV. And the emulation ability is awesome. So I don't reeeeally need one either, but I like it now that i have it. :)

    •  

      Now I want a HP MicroServer.

  •  

    or if u have an old pc around - you can try xpeonology ;)

    • +1 vote

      How does the power consumption compare between an old desktop PC and a purpose-built NAS?

      •  

        ~$50 more per year in power to run the PC

        • -3 votes

          you are correct, it will use way more power and is less green, these dumdums have no idea about cons with the PC route.
          PC is DIY not suitable for everyone but with a NAS like this its plug and play

          • +6 votes

            @ozdesi: yeah i have no idea.

            the idle of the 918+ with 4 drives is ~27W (https://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/Synology/DS918Plus/13.ht...) (~$70 per year in power usage)
            the idle of my machine with 4 drives is ~45W ($118 per year in power usage)

            The motherboard, CPU (i5 4570S) and RAM (8GB) im using cost me $100 and is a crap load more powerful than the 918. I previously had it running on the exact same hardware as the 918+ (asrock J3455-ITX) but it was too slow for my liking. So while i pay a little more for my power usage (~$4 a month), the machine is dramatically faster and if anything fails (see gamers nexus), its undoubtedly cheaper and easier to fix when out of warranty.

            So while i might be a dumdum - i've worked out what works best for my use case.

        • +1 vote

          Older desktop PCs use 100W idle. That’s 2.4kWh/day. At 30c/kWh that’s 72c/day, or $263/year.

          This NAS uses 20W idle, so more like $53/year.

          That’s a discrepancy of $210/year. So the NAS will have paid for itself in three years in terms of electricity alone.

          The discrepancy under load will be even higher.

          • +2 votes

            @ajmlr: Great price for that NAS, nice find OP!

            Power consumption is higher on desktop for sure.
            You are getting a lot more performance and versatility though, depends on what you want to achieve of course.

          • +2 votes

            @ajmlr: z170's use around 50w idle and just over 100w at load.

            why you would be running an entertainment pc performing some nas functions 24/7 is also unlikely.

            so essentially your scenario is just wrong.

          •  

            @ajmlr: It really depends on what hardware you refer to as old. I've got a bunch of old core 2 duo motherboards/cpus in my garage and there's a number of CPUs in there with a 65W TDP. At idle, these machines won't be sucking down 100W

            • +1 vote

              @ideasman: It comes down to, in a large part, the PSU.

              Modern gold-rated PSUs do a great job at idle. But many older ones will use in excess of 100W, even with only a small load in them from components. They’re really inefficient at the margins.

              I was shocked at the difference between my two desktop PCs at idle when I used a Kill-A-Watt to test them. One (a custom built SFF PC) used 40W, the other (a prebuilt one) used 130W.

          •  

            @ajmlr: EDIT: replied too late

          • -3 votes

            @ajmlr: These dumdums don't understand NAS HDD drives and hardware is designed for 24x7 usage and cheap PC parts are not.
            Of course if you put normal HDD's in NAS then it's a different story but a lot of people buy Blue, Red, Black HDD's.

            More powerful parts in PC are useless for NAS serving functions.

            • -1 vote

              @ozdesi: Um, PCs run 24/7 in thousands of offices and buildings worldwide. You are the one sounding like a "dumdum".

              And before you say enterprise desktops are designed for this.. They are actually often running hotter than home PCs due to compact designs.

              • -1 vote

                @spillmill: NAS is not enterprise desktop.
                NAS has a very specific function of Network Attached Storage although Synology allows a lot more like PLEX, CCTV camera's etc.

                PC's can be configured as NAS but they wouldn't be optimized in many ways to serve 24x7 like NAS.

                And no, NAS does not runner hotter than home PC's.

            • -1 vote

              @ozdesi: you're a laugh. im sure synology use the highest quality components available and not the same componentry that every other motherboard manufacturer uses.

              i am learning a lot from you though - PC's aren't designed for 24/7 operation? how many hours are they designed for?

              • +1 vote

                @ideasman: I said PC's are not designed to run 24x7 to function "as NAS" by serving files as it wears them out quicker.

                I never meant they are not designed to be running 24x7 based on the class of the machine.

                But guess what you will not learn.

                • +1 vote

                  @ozdesi: Serving out files wears it out quicker? Does my computer knows it's running as a "NAS"?

                  Please give me some more info. I've been working in the IT industry for 20 years but this is news to me! Can I trick it into thinking it's doing something else so it doesn't wear out as quick?

                  • -1 vote

                    @ideasman: 20 years of dumdumness!

                    •  

                      @ozdesi: Careful, you'll wear out your brain if you use it for longer than it was designed for ;)

                      •  

                        @ideasman: Careful, your brain is demanding ECC grade memory to retain knowledge bits and your cheap PC parts have very low MTBF rating and lack gold caps on the mainboard. Let's not even mention PSU quality.
                        Hang on, maybe these abbreviations were not there in 20 years of your IT existence and clearly missing from your $100 old PC parts setup.

                        •  

                          @ozdesi: hey good use of technical abbreviations for a joke but ultimately fails to back you up in any way - while my machine doesn't have a high MTBF rating or ECC memory - neither does this synology box which is 6x the price. but nice try none the less!

                          mine is serving plex media, performing transcoding and running ~12 dockers and doesn't break a sweat. if it fails, i can rebuild it with bits from my workshop. for me, there's no justification for getting a real synology box when all i see are downsides.

                          •  

                            @ideasman: It's not a joke, you have your own usage using reusable PC parts as NAS and see it as a cheap way of running it.

                            High MTBF ratings are for NAS HDD's not this box.
                            Agreed, ECC memory is not installed in this box but it does support it unlike a lot of cheap PC mobos.

                            A lot of people value their data way more than getting a cheap PC to run as NAS.
                            NAS provides hardware RAID options mostly out of the box unlike PC that requires add-on's.

                            Of course, your PC can run all those tasks as it has more powerful components but so can this box, it can do PLEX, transcoding, VM instances etc.

                            •  

                              @ozdesi: i'm pretty sure the 4 ironwolf drives im using have a decent enough MTBF for what it's doing.
                              the 918+ doesnt support ECC whatsoever (not sure why you brought it up)

                              i value my data - and consider it safer when i can move it into any number of hardware configurations rather than depending on a propriety hardware setup. i run a data recovery business so i have a some idea about data safety.

                              sure the 918+ can do the same tasks (as it's running the exact same software that my box is running, DSM 6.2) albeit much slower - and i know that, because i ran an asrock J3455-ITX motherboard which has an identical CPU as the 918+ with 8gb ram for a few weeks and it was too slow for my liking.

                              • +1 vote

                                @ideasman: You keep raising the low performance of the NAS, but your own system is of the same level of performance, costlier to run and more likely to fail.

                                •  

                                  @Austere: He doesn't worry about his system failing, he runs data recovery business and can recover lost data easily free of cost unlike 99% of us.
                                  Not sure why he used IronWolf NAS grade drives when he could have used cheap HDD's as well to go along with cheap PC parts.

                                •  

                                  @Austere: wait how do you figure that? im genuinely curious?

          • +1 vote

            @ajmlr:

            Older desktop PCs use 100W idle

            I have no idea but that seems absurdly high given modern desktop processors use 95W at full load.

            • +3 votes

              @Diji1: The processor is just one component, and PSUs are not 100% efficient.

              Typical desktop PCs use in the vicinity of 40-140W idle (yes, it varies that much, depending on parts and power management settings).

              Before leaving a PC on 24/7, checking it with a Kill-a-Watt meter is essential.

              My SFF build only uses 40W, because I built and configured it for low power, heat and noise.

              My off-the-shelf, four-year-old desktop uses 130W idle. No matter what I tweak, I can’t get that down.

        •  

          spot on!

    •  

      I thought xpenology has been lagging behind for a few years. I'm still running an older version of xpenology.

  • +1 vote

    Picked this up a month or two ago. Great value. Not the easiest to use for beginners but highly recommended.

  • +2 votes

    whoa.. that's a good price! I paid about 620 last month after cash back and I thought that was a good deal. Time to claim price protection on my credit card. Thanks OP!

  •  

    Dont forget Cash Rewards, so will end up costing around $570
    I bought one of these when they were 671, still trying to get my head around NAS migration from a Netgear readyNAS.

  •  

    Appears to be sold out.

  •  

    how come i cannot add to cart ? gone ?

  •  

    Price updated to $759

  •  

    Damn, missed out :|

    • +1 vote

      you can setup a price monitoring from camelcamelcamel

      This is how I found this in the morning.

      •  

        Good idea, I've used them for Amazon US in the past, hadn't thought of using them for the Australian one yet.

      •  

        thanks for the pro-tip!
        how do I get it to track the aussie amazon site rather than the American one?

  •  

    Dang. Just missed it.

  •  

    Nice price. The best previous deal has been ~$640 after ebay discounts.

  • +1 vote

    Thanks Op. Been using xpenelogy server for close to 4-5 years now. Wanting to upgrade to a rackmpunt synology. Anyone have an idea where and when to look for a good deal?

    Cheers

  •  

    What's this?

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