Will You Take a Position in Rural Area for a Salary Increase of $10K (if It Meant a 4 Hour Commute)

Currently earning $90k. Spending roughly 2 hours on the road every day.
The new position offered is located in Shepparton with an annual salary of $100K. Title is better.
I live in a northern suburb. But it's still a 2-hour drive to shepparton. So will be 4 hours on the road every day.
Would you take such opportunity ?

Or is it a better idea to just move to Shepparton ??
I don't want to rent out my current property to random people though…
Thanks for all your advice !

Comments

  • +13 votes

    Are you saying your commute will go from 2 hours to 4 hours per day?

    • +1 vote

      Yes.

      • +40 votes

        You may want to look at moving out those ways.

        • +168 votes

          I wouldn't even commute 2 hours a day.

          • +3 votes

            @tshow: Damn right.

          •  

            @tshow: Yeah man it blows my mind that this can be normal for anyone.

            • +16 votes

              @trapper: i think its normal for millions of people. my commute to work is an hour door to door via public transport, the drive is like 40 mins but i cant stand being in traffic - i find the train relaxing and i can get work done

              edit: oh shit 2 hours each way? yeh fk that

              •  

                @ideasman: I know a super stingy guy who lives 2.5 hours each way from work only so he could save a hundred dollars every month. He wakes up at 5 to get to work at 8. Some people are mad.

          •  

            @tshow: I commute at best 2 hours a day (there and back) worst case it can get towards 3…

          •  

            @tshow: 2 hours per day (1hr each way) is honestly not a big deal.

            Not everyone can live near work and even if you do, it can still take a while.

            A friend of mine lived in an inner city suburb in Melbourne which wasn't a great distance by car to work, a car which they didn't have, but to get to work he had to get a bus, then change to a tram, then walk from the closest stop and all up it would take close to an hour despite being maybe 10km from work.

            •  

              @Nebargains: 10km on a bike doesn't take very long, and you get fit.

          •  

            @tshow: I did 2hr 15mins each way for 5years. It's doable as long as the journey is comfortable. I slept on the train and caught up on other work using my laptop.

      • +5 votes

        How much more are you going to be spending on petrol and incurring in depreciation?

      • +74 votes

        that 10k works out to be 118 bucks extra in your pocket per week after tax. So each day you drive to work you are getting paid 23.6 dollars to do an extra two 2 hours of driving. I have a feeling your hourly rate is better than $11.8/hr…

        • +14 votes

          Now include petrol etc

        • +9 votes

          /thread

      • +1 vote

        Time = life. 2 hours x 240 work days (assuming some annual leave and public holidays) = 480 hours which is a good chunk of time. Increased long distance travel = increased risk of accident. Most people work hard to enjoy themselves in retirement….some don't live long enough, some keep on working, some get too old to enjoy it. The only time you have is now, live simply, spend cheaply, enjoy the time you still have…. Merry Christmas by the way!

  • +5 votes

    So will be 4 hours on the road every day

    Is this a monday to friday job, then hell no. Im about to join a job where it will be 2 hours each way but its 2 on 5 off

    Is this a job you love? Would your life benefit from living in shepparton? Life you would think would also be cheaper there so you could potentially sell / rent your house for more than what you would get one in shepparton for? (*not knowing the area)

    To me it would all comes down to the job and area. Do you love your current job? Do you love where you live? If location isnt as important then maybe its time to pick up

    •  

      Yes it is a Mon-Fri job.
      I agree with you that 2 on 5 off might be a good idea. I mean to bargain for a working from home option.

      • +12 votes

        Are you single? Do you have many friends and family where you are currently?

        10K is too small a jump to uproot your life. I would think about it for 20K and more definite for 30K to 40K.

        If you can arrange to work from home, I'd definitely take the 10K.

    •  

      @k-rokfm

      Would your life benefit from living in shepparton?

      With all due respect, would anyone's life benefit from living in Shepparton?

      (I can say this because Shep was my home town… just like certain racial groups can use otherwise verboten racial epithets by virtue of their group membership.)

  • +8 votes

    No I wouldn't, especially with the additional 2 hours on road every day

  • +27 votes

    I think commit 100% and move there or nothing at all.

  •  

    Financially it doesn't make sense if you don't rent out your current property to offset the rental in Shepperton if you relocate.

    Does Shepperton offer you the kind of lifestyle you want?

    • +2 votes

      I can actually live on my own with internet. The title is attractive. If I can work with that title for 2 years, it will be beneficial for my future career back in Melbourne.

      • +30 votes

        live on my own
        .
        .
        .
        with internet

        ( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°)

        • +1 vote

          dirty minded :D

        • +24 votes

          Thought it's the same for every Ozbargainer - switching between Pornhub, Ozbargain, Pornhub, Ozbargain.

          • +3 votes

            @zdterry: That's so unhygienic. I don't want that stuff on my cards and in my wallet…

          •  

            @zdterry: What about the hearty hamster?

          •  

            @zdterry: that's the cycle for buying & testing Eneloop batteries

      •  

        I'll look after your home, homie.

  • +17 votes

    In hand difference - from $5615 increases to $6123 - that's roughly $500

    You probably stand to lose that in just the increased fuel cost. If your commute increases by 2hours (rural), I am imagining this is about 150 extra kms of travel. Depending on what you drive, this means a minimum $10 extra fuel. Not taking wear and tear into account.

    Or the extra work to rent your home out, rent one for yourself, manage the property via a real estate agent, moving homes from Melb to Shepparton….

    • +1 vote

      Or the extra work to rent your home out, rent one for yourself, manage the property via a real estate agent, moving homes from Melb to Shepparton….

      Not knowing melb / shepparton areas this may be offset partially by cheaper rent in shepparton? or better size house for your money

    •  

      Car expenses will be reimbursed at cents per kilometres rate (I think it is 0.68).
      I will drive 350km in total a day. So will be reimbursed for $238.
      Property-wise, I only just bought my house and renovated..Really hate to rent it out.
      Guess will have to weigh the extra salary income over the rent at Shepparton.

      • +3 votes

        Is this something your company does as commuting from your residence to primary work site isn't something that can usually be claimed.

        •  

          Home to work isn't usually deductible. This type of reimbursement is more like incentive for extra travel so will be handled as special case.

          • +4 votes

            @zdterry: Is this travel reimbursement written into the contract for the duration of your tenure? Otherwise it can be rescinded any time.

      • +11 votes

        Just to clarify on the reimbursement. They will be paying an extra $238 per day for you to commute? Is there a limit on this eg, over time it will go down or after x months it will finish? Cause thats an extra $50k+ travel reimbursement which would be very attractive

      • +7 votes

        Personally I would not want that long a commute, even for the $10k. Although I do like listening to audiobooks while driving. I would also take into account the risks of driving so much, doing it when tired, early in the morning fog, in the dark in the wintertime etc.
        For some reason rentals seem to be quite expensive in Shepparton, but buying a house is not really. At least not compared to Melbourne! If you have the money or can get a loan, you'd be best off buying a cheap house to live in, then later rent it out. And maybe renovate while living in it. Or you could just come and live in our spare garage, as I live in Shepparton! Free use of the pool included! =)

      • +1 vote

        If they are willing to spend nearly $1200 a week in travel reimbursements, can you not negotiate with them to provide you with a rental property in Shepparton?

      • +1 vote

        This makes the difference, if your getting paid to travel, even in per km rates, then it's probably a no brainer, go for it. Otherwise, for the 10k raise alone, not worth it. However, keep in mind that it's a long time on the road and concentration levels can dwindle after excessive driving. I did a 100+ km travel each way for two years, about 1.25hr each way, and it really cuts into your personal time. 4 hours a day + 8 hrs work, 12 hours min away from home per day. If you have family or even a partner, living closer to work would gain you extra hours with them. Just my 2c :)

      • +1 vote

        I kind of find it hard to believe that the employer is willing to pay $56,000 in reimbursements. (238 * 5 = 1190. Give it 47 weeks in a year discounting annual leave and a week of sick leave, 1190 * 47 = $55930.)

        However if that is true, there is no way your additional travel costs (fuel and car depreciation/maintenance) would get anywhere close to that figure, especially given your already travelling 2 hours a day, which sounds like its not reimbursed. If you call it $10,000 more in travel costs (I doubt its even close to that high) the rest goes in your pocket.

        So the final equation is more like 90k vs 156k.

      •  

        Are you sure? What company reimburses travel expenses to/from work?

    •  

      In hand difference - from $5615 increases to $6123 - that's roughly $500

      I'm not sure I understand your math. $10k per year is $200 per week. Half goes in tax, so it's $100 extra in the OP's pocket per week.

      • +3 votes

        referring to https://www.paycalculator.com.au/

        $200 per week is correct however exact tax won't be half I reckon.

        •  

          That's a great tool. Thanks.

        •  

          People really need to know how tax works in this country.

          1. he is not on the top tax bracket, no way half goes to tax.
          2. He is at the max of the 90 bracket so the tax he pays on that portion of the 100K remains exactly the same at $20797
          3. the tax he will pay on the extra 10k is 37 cents for each dollar.
      • +1 vote

        Lol what? "Half goes to tax"? Only if OP is earning over 180k, otherwise it's more like a third.

        • +2 votes

          I was talking in rough figures, just as I suspect you are with your "lol what, it's more like a third". Half of $200 is $100. Two thirds of $200 is about $133.

          The OP will end up with exactly $117.31 extra in their pocket for a $10k raise from $90k to $100k. Seems to me that your two thirds is almost exactly as far off as my half. "Lol, what" indeed.

          •  

            @pjetson: Yep definitely not worth it.

          •  

            @pjetson: Uhh isn't it $1,700 you're off by? Not sure where you get your difference from but that is a fair amount to be off by.

  •  

    If you want the money, take the job. If you don't like the commute and/or don't want to rent out your house, sell up and move to Shep.

  • +3 votes

    rural living is cheaper and salaries are lower because of this. if you move to shepparton with a HIGHER wage, its a lucky deal. commuting more than 3 hours/day? only if you can leave early and work while travelling. but there isnt a train for you so its probably a terrible idea to be driving 4h a day.

    • +1 vote

      There is a train between Melbourne and Shepparton with frequent services.

    •  

      Houses are cheaper to buy but not much else is.

      Also whilst the houses are cheaper, you will often find they also don't have the same amount of growth as the large metro areas.

  • +5 votes

    Also factor in that all that time driving the GV and Hume highways is mind-numbing and your risk of falling asleep at the wheel is much greater than in city commuting.

    As has been mentioned, vast increase in vehicle running costs as well
    The only way it is worth it is to relocate to Shepparton and sell/rent your home.

    FWIW, Shep is a nice rural city (town), I grew up in Benalla and Shepparton was where we would go monthly for shopping trips and the like. It would depend on your lifestyle though as to if it would be a fit for you.

    •  

      Agree totally with this comment. I assume you are in medical field? I don't know of many $100k jobs in Shep. If it increases your chances of job opportunities in the future then give it a crack. Sounds like you are young and single so it could be a nice adventure / change in your life that you didn't know you needed.

  • +4 votes

    Not a chance unless it was very short term stepping stone to something better. I value my time too much. Roughing out the calculations you lose at least 30% to tax leaving you $7k but you also lose 480 hours of your time per year. Do you value your time at more than ~$14.50/hr? That's not even taking into account increased travel expenses that would reduce it further. Maybe the rent difference would help make that up but I'm not familiar with the areas enough to say.

    If you were to permanently move there then that could change things as you'd likely recover time you're already spending commuting.

    • +3 votes

      NO DEAL. Danger of having major high speed accident increased purely through time on road. $10K is not enough to consider the commute, not even if company car was part of deal.

      As apsilon says but you also lose 480 hours of your time per year. Do you value your time at more than ~$14.50/hr? Time is money in this case.

      No way.

    •  

      That assumes OP currently have no commute time. OP says have an hour of commute each way so accounting for that brings that up to ~$30/hr.

      •  

        No, it assumes an EXTRA 2 hours a day, ie only what the change costs above current situation, not the total commute.

        •  

          My bad you're right

  • +16 votes

    you are crazy if you want to commute 4 hours each day

  • +2 votes

    I am more intrigued by OP's multiple references to the job title being 'better'.
    Job titles mean nothing.

    If the job itself is more attractive, take the plunge and move there.
    Rent your current place for 12 months and then decide if you will probably return, or if you will not.

    • +1 vote

      Job titles mean nothing.

      Not true. They can get you a foot in the door.

      If you get 2 job appllications, one from a 'sales assistant', and one from a 'state sales & distribution manager', which one would you call in for an interview?

      •  

        Would entirely depend on the role I was looking to fill. If it was for wait staff at a cafe I'd wonder WTF is this supposedly over qualified state sales & distribution manager doing applying for work at a cafe?

        •  

          Well you agree that the title is a factor of consideration, which was the point I was making.

  •  

    It's nothing for my commuter to do 4 hrs each day

  • +14 votes

    4hr commute, thats insane waste of life

  • +5 votes

    Negotiate for accommodation and utilities included close to your new worksite.

    This is a win win. Owner gets to buy a property and claim tax deductions as it is used for work, you get a place to stay.

  • +1 vote

    PS. Assuming 250 work days a year, you are taking on 1,000 hours of extra commitment for $10k.

    That's $10/hr ex petrol and depreciation.

    Hell, that doesn't even cover petrol alone let alone depreciation.

  •  

    Can you put in an extra 2 hours overtime to get that 10 per week?

  •  

    I don't know the VIC average commute times, but thousands upon thousands of people commute 2 hours each way into Sydney.
    They may live on the Central Coast, or Blue Mountains or Illawarra regions and 2 hours is just a typical commute time.

    Based on that, grab that new job and be grateful of the extra 10K. I assume you'll be driving so there'd be an extra petrol expense. It would bring the pay rise down to maybe $5K to $8K.

    • +1 vote

      They're not commuting 4 hour for a measly $15 P/h.

  • +1 vote

    I currently commute 1hr45m - 2hrs a day but I go from "rural" to the City to work. If I thought I could earn the same or close to the same near where I live I would seriously consider working closer to home. Although if I was in your situation I would either move closer to work where rent/houses are probably cheaper or stay where I was.

  •  

    Whats $10K more on top of your current salary? another $500 a month, that's 125 a week or an increase of 25 a day.

    Now is that amount enough for you to want to deal with traffic, drive in and out for at least 4 hours a day? more insurance, higher chance in accident, car depreciation..in all honesty nope unless you move there.

    if you really want to spend 4 hours driving, might as well try and join the ride share company, pretty sure your 4 hours worth of driving can get you more than 25.

    But that's just my thought.

  •  

    Madness, use the offer to negotiate a pay rise where you are if money is the only factor

  • +3 votes

    Why not rent a cheap 1br flat in Shepparton for sub $200 that you sleep in mon, tue, wed, thur, then drive back to your place Friday night for the weekend, then straight to work from your place on Monday? Then it’s only 4 hours per week extra instead of per day. Think of what you could do with all that time.

    • +3 votes

      $200 a week is $10,400 a year, he'd be losing money.

      • +2 votes

        From what I gathered above, it's not just about money. OP hopes this job will further their career when they move back to melbourne.

    • +2 votes

      It's not four hours per week extra, it's six hours per week less.

    • +2 votes

      Yeah. It's not like your family/loved one(s) will get any value out of you if you commute.

      Up before crack of dawn every day… back after dark… exhausted from getting up before dawn, driving… working… then driving another two hours when finished…

      This suggestion is the only one which has any traction. Trying to equate time to dollars, etc as many have done is useless. You will be too exhausted to appreciate any extra few dollars…

      •  

        Plus increased takeaway food costs.. who is even going to bother cooking if their commute is 4hrs per day?

  • +2 votes

    OP just take the train. You don't have to drive.

    Take the title and money. Instead of spending 2 hours on the road driving, spend 4 hours on the train doing work, reading, watching a movie.

    •  

      Looks like the train would be 3 hours each way. I guess op could use that time to sleep.

      •  

        2 Hours. OP said they are in Northern burbs.

    • +1 vote

      A few of my colleagues do exactly this. 2+ hour train ride each way.

      In the mornings, they basically factor it into their sleep time - get up early, head to the station and board the train, promptly go back to sleep.

      •  

        Aren’t Victorian trains free if arrive before 7am?

      • +3 votes

        They might get the same quantity of sleep, but the quality might be lacking because it's broken sleep.

    • +2 votes

      Train timetables are usually set up to move people from rural areas to the city in the morning and the opposite direction at the end of the day. OP is inverting that, the timetables could be sh*t!

  • +6 votes

    Not for a measly $10,000 a year. You must have no life commuting 2 hours a day, and have rocks in your head if you want to increase that to 4 hours!

  • +5 votes

    Early in my career I took a job in another city (living in Wollongong NSW and job in Sydney).

    I was young, keen and single with no significant other commitments.

    The job turned out great, but the commute (1 hour 40 min on train, nearly 2 hours door to door - in the days before iPad/phones were a thing) and hours nearly killed me. My life became a bit unbalanced with work (and commuting) taking over.

    I lasted 18 months commuting before biting the bullet and moving to Sydney.

    So, if the job (for career opportunity, not just $10k) is worth it, give it a crack.

    Good luck.

    • +1 vote

      So true. My life is all hell atm considering the time lost in travel. Miss my uni days, where I lived 5min drive from work.

      I live in a much smaller town but still end up commuting 2 hours each way. Can’t even move out closer to work as I work two jobs. One job being two hours north of the city, and another being two hours south of the city.

      Can’t get a new job either due to recession in the state…. worst luck ever lol.

  •  

    That's 10hrs a week, which is 500 hrs a year and over 20 days a year just for the extra travel. 40 days total just for travel every year. I'm not sure that's worth $10k extra, extra travel time and the lower quality of life.

  • +3 votes

    Assuming you have a home loan, rent out your home and negative gear it. Your rent in Shepparton is likely to be cheaper so win win win all round. More pay, get tax savings, get rent income, pay less petrol, have less commute.

    •  

      Probably a fair chance it could be positively geared too - even better!

  • +1 vote

    No for commute.
    Relocate possibly but depends on your lifestyle.

  • +14 votes

    I would take the job in Shepparton provided I could find a nice place to live within 15 minutes commute. That way it would be an increase in salary, better job title AND 1.5hrs per day of my life back.