expired Xiaomi M365 Folding Electric Scooter International Version with 2 Spare Tyres $593.96 Delivered @ Gearbite eBay via App

900
PAPP10

Looks like the cheapest ever for this scooter.

Illegal in NSW, VIC, WA and TAS.

Must be registered as a motor vehicle in SA and NT.

Can be used legally in QLD.
(Thanks potplanty)

Original 10% off Sitewide via eBay App deal

ABN 85 106 584 418

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Comments

  • +4 votes

    NSW law says no, so for those reasons I'm out.

    • +62 votes

      This isn't Shark Tank.

    • +1 vote

      yeah I assume they do actually fine people as I sometimes see someone riding a new looking one to the train station for a few days in a row then never again so if they weren't busting people I think we would see more that the occasional one. Hope the law changes soon as I do want one :)

    • +9 votes

      Time to move to Brisbane

      #whereelsebutqueenslandbruh

    • +1 vote

      Why is it not legal to have a electric scooter in NSW? Is it only to this Xiaomi model?

      I've seen people riding electric scooter along beach walk paths…

      • +12 votes

        https://roadsafety.transport.nsw.gov.au/stayingsafe/pedestri...

        quote, "Powered foot scooters and skateboards cannot be registered and can only be used on private land"

        NSW loves a rule and the myth of the laid back Australian culture continues.

      •  

        Electric scooters were legalised in QLD recently but only up to 200w - unfortunately this is 250w max but who would know just by looking at it.
        Hoping NSW follows suit - seen a guy fined $600 on George St in Sydney

      • +11 votes

        NSW is the state of no fun allowed.

        •  

          just asked a foot patrol coppa about it. they have NFI about the criteria and asked me to look up RMS (which is correct).

          I then pressed them on whether they will fine one on the spot and they said they will seek assistance from specialized "officers" first.

          In Sydney, Lime ebike is configured in a way that it's not fully automated motored bikes. They're therefore not banned or required to be registered to use.

      •  

        I think there is concern these Xiaomi scooters can and will be used by Chinese spies.

        I for one don’t want to risk getting arrested when I go visit North America later this year.

    •  

      That's one reason

  •  

    Wow I was just about to post this! Thanks chibot!

    •  

      Sorry polarq.

      • +5 votes

        Haha, no worries! I don't have to worry about doing the work of writing and publishing the post, in the end just wanted everyone to know and you have done it for me. All good! :)

  • +14 votes

    Seeing more and more of these on the street. Wish our laws would expressly allow these, at the moment you're always riding in hope police will turn a blind eye

    •  

      Um, maybe that should read:
      "…Wish these were legal so that I could ride in public places…"

    • +6 votes

      Move to QLD ;)

      • +1 vote

        too hot for the bike and myself

      • -7 votes

        We will know when the trial is over in QLD. Too many accidents with these.

        • +3 votes

          They're already fully legalised in QLD - the Lime trial is totally separate

          •  

            @Hinee: Source? When I looked up the laws a few months ago, when Lime first started, electric scooters were still limited to 200w.

            • +3 votes

              @macrocephalic: QLD Transport

              No rules on motor size - just max speed 25km/h

              •  

                @Hinee: So they've been lumped in with mobility devices now, rather than recreational devices.

                • +1 vote

                  @macrocephalic: It is a mobility devices / transportation tools, not a toy.

                  This is the issue with these e-scooters, people confuse these with the $20 kick scooters for kid they buy from K-Mart…

                  •  

                    @Kampfer: Until they changed the rules (very recently) they were classed as toys. The changes have put them in with mobility devices.

                    •  

                      @macrocephalic: These 200+ watt ~25km/h e-scooters were illegal before the rules (in QLD).

                      They are different to the kick scooters that are legal in most States, similar to (non-electric) skateboard.

                      •  

                        @Kampfer: Before the legislation changes, electric scooters [that aren't road registrable] fell under the classification of wheeled recreational devices - as such they were restricted to 200w. That made this particular scooter illegal [to use on roads, road related areas, and paths], but you could get other scooters which were less than 200w and they were legal to use.

                        The legislation change has classified electric scooters as mobility devices rather than wheeled recreational devices, so they no longer have a wattage limit, but have a speed limit.

                        Non-powered scooters aren't really in the scope of this discussion as it's specifically the power that affects their legality.

        • +8 votes

          I was working in an ED department in QLD during the rollout of Lime, yeah you do get about 1 minor accident a night but it will almost always be under the influence of alcohol or some other substance.

          Haven't seen anything too serious come out of these things. Motorbikes are probably the worst offenders in terms of devastating accidents but they're still legal. Bikes are pretty bad too, especially when cyclists get hit by cars.

        •  

          Interesting article popped up on ABC:
          https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-01-21/lime-scooters-cause-i...

          When will the Lime trial be reviewed?
          Other states may be holding fire until then.

      •  

        best move you can make

  • +1 vote

    Heard these going gangbusters in Brisbane. Wouldn't mind one in Melbs

    • +5 votes

      yep, they have blown up since they were made legal. A really solid way of travelling from A to B inside a 10KM radius

      • +10 votes

        About as safe as a pushbike?

        • +4 votes

          I don't know about that.

          Where there is a mix of pedestrians/bikes/scooters the scooters generally travel faster and more dangerously than bikes. They are very nimble and can brake, accelerate and weave much easier than bikes in congested areas around pedestrians, so the potential is there for greater risk of accidents.

          Pushbikes tend to be more docile in such environments because it takes too much energy for the rider to continually brake and accelerate heavily and they're not as nimble.

          I also see scooters mixing with pedestrians in places where you normally don't see bikes which means greater risk to pedestrians at least.

          •  

            @tranter: As much as I'm pro-e scooter, this is an inconvenient truth that most of us don't want to hear.

            •  

              @Kampfer: I'm the same as you. Maybe I got the negs because people thought I was anti-scooter.

            •  

              @Kampfer: Should let them ride in bike only lanes on the road and also on roads with a shoulder to help with this.

              25km/hr is about the same speed/faster than a lot of commuters on regular bicycles.

              •  

                @plasmapuff: In QLD it is legal to ride bicycle on footpaths. The new e-scooter law is more of less in-line with the bicycle/ebike laws in QLD. With the 25km/h speed limit (as per e-bikes), I don't think e-scooters need extra regulations over bicycles/e-bikes.

                •  

                  @Kampfer: I agree,but there are.
                  Currently it's illegal to ride them on bike only lanes on the road or non suburban streets.

                  Thus you're getting all the kick back from pedestrians as scooters are forced to share tight crowded foot paths with them.

                  • +3 votes

                    @plasmapuff: I hope that they eventually amend the new laws to allow scooters the CHOICE of travelling in bike lanes.

                    As someone who's used the lime scooters to zip through Brisbane CBD a few times now, I hate going past pedestrians as much as they hate me going past them, but I'm legally not allowed to pull out into the bike lane, I have to sit behind pedestrians as they walk slowly in a long line, and then after maybe 30-40 seconds I can squeeze past.

                    I don't see the logic in banning them from bike lanes personally. Would make life so much easier for everyone.

      • +3 votes

        totally safe for the footpath or the road, its the rider that makes it not safe

    •  

      I saw someone riding one yesterday and thought it was a lime. these look way cooler.

  • +5 votes

    Illegal in NSW, VIC and TAS.

    Must be registered as a motor vehicle in SA and NT.

    Can be used legally in QLD and WA.

  • +3 votes

    Any idea on ACT?

  • +1 vote

    Any like this that can take 115kg?

  • +29 votes

    A perfect solution to congestion issues specially for Sydney and Melbourne. Yet our nanny states rub their fingers for potential revenue raised while hiding behind their orange OHS vests shouting "SAFETY ISUESS".

    •  

      Out of interest, do you think you should be able to ride them on the footpath or the road?

      • +4 votes

        Footpath like a lot of other developed countries where this isn't illegal. All it takes is some common sense and consideration to ride these on footpaths safely tbh.

        • +4 votes

          I don't think you've ridden one of these. They're a bit too fast & heavy to safely use on Australia's narrow footpaths.

          Perfect for Bike Paths or side of the road.

          •  

            @railspider: Totally agree - 25km/h is far too quick for a footpath. It especially doesn't leave enough time to avoid cars exiting driveways in more suburban settings.

            I went to Sydney CBD for 3 days just recently and saw 3 people on M365's, all on footpaths, all without helmets. However, they were limited to walking speed due to the pedestrian congestion (which kind of defeats the purpose of a vehicle, no?)

            I live outer city Melbourne and ride my M365 exclusively in the bike lane with a helmet. I travel at very similar speeds to bikes around me and feel quite safe - both my personal safety and safety of cars and pedestrians around me.

          •  

            @railspider: they seem to be coping with the Lime's in Auckland, they are all over the place.

        •  

          Curious what your opinion is of regular bicycles on footpaths then?

          •  

            @potplanty: Like I mentioned above, whether it's electric scooters, bicycles, skateboards, segways, hoverboards are fine on footpaths with "common sense and consideration".

            This works perfectly fine in many countries where people think of others not just themselves.

            Or are you one of those where someone on a skateboard goes past you on a footpath, you start screaming with your fists up "Those Damn Youths!"?

            • +2 votes

              @ozeebee: As someone who almost got hit by one yesterday (saved by my own reflexes, not those of the rider), I don't believe they belong on the footpath if they're going full speed. Far too dangerous.

              • +5 votes

                @dontpanic: I agree they shouldn't be going their highest possible speed on footpaths.

                I also don't think cars should go their highest possible speed on all roads and driveways.

        •  

          I don't know where you live or work, but I can't imagine riding one of these on most footpaths in the Melbourne CBD, they are fairly narrow but there is also just too many people. I will admit that I haven't ridden one, but I have seem people rolling around on them and they don't seem terribly agile to work through crowds, and they have a large footprint. Comment below is relevant, it would be the same as bikes on footpaths, which is a disaster.

      •  

        I think if footpaths were speed-limited to say 15km/hr then why not? On roads I am not so keen - car drivers are hopeless.

      •  

        If they dont exceed 25km/h i think you should be able to ride them anywhere. Its no different from a human-powered bike or scooter.

        •  

          And human-powered bikes are not permitted on footpaths in NSW…

          I think 25kph presents some danger for pedestrians hence I suggested 15. However, State govts could do a lot more to encourage bicycle and scooter use.

  • +9 votes

    ugh i really want one. and i live in VIC

    • +1 vote

      Where in Vic are you?

      I'm in St Kilda - few people, myself included, zipping around on electric scooters and skateboards. I haven't anecdotally heard of any Victorians being fined. Only a few stories from NSW.

      • +1 vote

        I'm not aware of special pockets of VIC that are exempt of this law lol. I know there's a company called… <cant rmb the name> which had placed a few scooters limited to 10k/h and apparently under the 200w rule so it's legal.

        I can't really afford a fine so I can't risk it.

        I'm in collingwood, vic.

        •  

          Haha wasn't trying to suggest certain areas are exempt. My guess is that the CBD with greater police and pedestrian presents may be enforced a little stricter than the surrounding suburbs.

          Lime is also trialing hire scooters at Monash Clayton, as it is not on public roads.

    • +1 vote

      I’ve owned the M365 for a couple of weeks now and let me tell you, 2% of the police force actually know about the rule, perhaps less. I’ve rode the scooter in front of police vehicles and in no way did they start questioning me, so yes while VicRoads states that it’s illegal, you can still use it

      • +4 votes

        Most of them know of course. It's just that they don't care or it's not a priority for them at the moment.

    • +2 votes

      Bit the bullet. Got one. Will ride in 3m circles around my garage I guess. Lol.

  • +14 votes

    With the recent change in QLD laws I thought long and hard about getting a electric scooter or skateboard.
    This Xiaomi M 365 scooter (same as Lime scooters) was tempting but I ultimately went for an electric skateboard (Ownboard Mini KT).

    Key deciding factor for me was enhanced portability of the skateboard – meaning I could take it easily on buses/trains/stowed away in the staff locker/staff rooms. Its the size of a normal skateboard (30 inches) and can be carried in one hand – although it is fairly heavy at 7.6kg, but still much better than a scooter (12.5kg). Very easy to do even in peak hour, where as the scooter I imagine would be tough on a packed bus/train, if they even let you on in the first place.

    Range and top speed is actually better than the Xiaomi scooter if you spec the pricier Sanyo batteries. 40km/hr top speed, 30km range (20km range for standard batteries). Climbs 20-25% gradient hills.
    Cost is comparable – $760 for the 30km range battery, $590 for the 20km range one.Fun factor for the skateboard also has the scooter beat – drive and acceleration feels stronger and more direct IMO.

    Main con of the skateboard over the scooter is stability and ease of use. Going 25km/hr on a skateboard takes some practice and is not as easy initially as a scooter. After a few hours of practice, its definitely achievable though. I have come from a skateboarding/in line skating background in my youth so perhaps it was slightly easier for me. The missus isn't game to ride on it, whereas the scooter is more noob friendly and IMO easier than riding a bike. You could get a more stable and easy to ride long board (38"), but that takes away some of the portability.

    I'm riding it ~8km along the V1 Bikeway to the city fairly easily without breaking a sweat. Also easy to just ride the 1 km to the bus stop on days I'm feeling lazy/running late.

    Definitely recommend giving it a thought for QLDers and hopefully in other states when the government laws catch up to the 21st century.

    In no particular order, these are the reputable chinese board manufacturers that are recommended:
    http://ownboard.net
    https://wowgoboard.com
    https://www.meepoboard.com/boards/
    https://www.backfireboards.com

    I'd avoid the no name ebay and Amazon sellers that are flogging 2+ years old tech with unreliable batteries. You can get lighter Penny Boards in the 3-5kg range, but IMO they're more like toys than actual commuting options. Just too small to be stable going over bumps/debris that you would find on a normal commute. Might be ok for a skate park.

    As you'll see , they're often quite similar and are simply assembling off the shelf components under their "brand". At half the price of a Boosted board, for me it was a no brainer. Hub drive motors also means less maintenance and cleaning that on the other hand the Boosted boards need for their belt driven motors.

    Happy to answer any questions on electric skateboards should people have any :)
    Definitely give it a thought :)

    •  

      "40km/hr top speed"

      Does it make the e-skateboard illegal? Look at the spec it can set up to do 20 km/h (too slow) or 30/40 km/h (illegal).

      I can't see e-skateboard become popular with their deep(er) learning curve.

      I've tried the LIME scooter and do think it's a great travelling/commuting tool. I hope the police can enforce the rules fully, so the idiots who treat it like a toy won't ruin it for everyone who use it as it should.

      • +1 vote

        Middle mode at 30km/hr is practice gives you 25km/hr after your back pack, terrain and not going ham on the accelerator. Haven't been game on using the 40km/hr mode yet.

        I'm not saying it's going to be more popular, just something people should also consider.

        The ability to take it freely on public transport regardless of peak hour is a game changer for me which outweighs the initial steeper learning curve.

    •  

      This Xiaomi M 365 scooter (same as Lime scooters)

      I don't think this is right - Lime uses Segway Ninebot while Bird uses the M365

      •  

        Lime uses the M365.
        I have a ninebot myself.

        •  

          I still don't think that's right. The M365 doesn't have the speedometer that the Segway (and Lime) has. Plus all my googling leads me back to my original thought.

          •  

            @Hinee: They're obviously custom orders when you are ordering as many as they did so it can't explain everything. The initial Lime scooter was a Xiaomi, but it's since been revised I believe…based on the video reviews I've seen on YouTube anyways.

    •  

      8kg is still damn heavy to be carrying around on public transport or anywhere. That's like 4 x 2litre jugs of milk. Wake me when they get down to ~3kg.

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