• expired

Large Butter Croissant 10 Pack $4.50 (Was $9) @ Woolworths

1870

Ingredients
Wheat Flour, Butter (Cream (Milk)), Water, Sugar,Wheat Gluten, Yeast, Salt, Egg,Natural Colour (160a).Contains: Egg, Gluten and Milk.May be present: Peanuts, Soybeans, Sesame Seeds,Tree Nuts, Sulphites and Lupin.
Allergen
Egg, Gluten, Milk
Allergen may be present
Lupin, Peanuts, Sesame, Soy, Sulphites, Tree Nuts

Made in Australia from 72% Australian ingredients

You may ask for rain check if there is none on shelves.

Mod: OP please place additional information about the deal (ingredients, rain check, country of origin etc.) in the description only.

Related Stores

Woolworths
Woolworths

closed Comments

  • +3

    Hi OP, do they freeze the crossaints and defrost it and sell it to us?

    • The small packs of 3/4 are certainly frozen before putting on display but they're still the best we've found at general supermarkets (Coles, WW, IGA, Aldi).

      The others seem much drier.

      • +25

        Yes, it's wet when I touched it there

        • +13

          (ㆆ_ㆆ)

        • +16

          But what about the croissants?

      • +3

        They need to go 5/6 minutes in the oven

      • +7

        Costco's so much better than those supermarkets ones

        • +2

          Same goes for their Lamingtons. I couldn't believe the difference. They were fluffy, fresh and spongey compared to Woolworth's; so dry and stale which I used to think was normal.

          • +1

            @wizzlesticks: Alot of the bakery lines are frozen and defrosted. Shame really.

        • Do Costco bake in store? i only been costco few time as don't live near one. i have try lamingtons and croissants

      • +1

        I found Aldi is slightly cheaper and quality is there too.
        Don't make my way there often, but when I do I pick up a few packs

      • Agree, ppl look at me like I've gone daft when I recommend these ones but they're really not bad at all. I freeze them and then reheat in <10 mins on my bbq! (Faster than heating up the damned oven).

    • +4

      Yes. All frozen.

    • They come frozen and uncooked, then they are baked.

  • +5

    What Ingredients need to be imported to make these???

    • We can be safe to know 72% is from Australia. The rest is from… somewhere.

      • +16

        New Zealand or French butter usually

        • excellent call

        • +4

          I worked in a bakery about 10 years ago, most “nz” items are just eu items repackaged for trade reasons unless it’s changed since then. Similar to Kmart selling swiss made choc packaged in China

      • -1

        how do i know its not from congo mate

        • HAHAHA

          Yeah not really

    • Exactly what I was thinking.

  • +10

    I was wondering why my mom came home with a tray of croissants..

    • +11

      Your mum knows a bargain when she sees one

      • +1

        Must resist temptation to make "your mum" joke.

      • +1

        This is the most wholesome 'Your Mum' comment ever.

  • -3

    How do we know it's 72%.. What happened if it found to be 71.82%?

    • +1

      They are probably importing 72% of butter from overseas.

      • +8

        But these are made in Australia from 72% Australian ingredients
        I don't think it's possible to add another 72% of ingredients

        • unless NASA

  • +2

    Good deal, but I do have a passion for Ham and Havarti croissants and I can say the Coles ones are nicer. Flakey inside instead of solid.

  • +10

    If you like croissants, don't buy these. There are good bakeries that are baking really good croissants in every major city :)
    Those are good to use for ham and cheese croissants though ;)

    • +35

      But my cafe charges $6 per croissant

      • +2

        lmfao ikr and a toastie for $5

      • +1

        I find it rip off, but then i always wonder how do they make money by just selling croissants and coffee like you don't see them always have a customer do you and rent is forking expensive like $4000 a week or so.

        • How do you know the location of his cafe?

          • @jackspratt: i'm just saying in general. Thats the normal price of rent in australia.

            • @DisabledUser345744: Sounds very expensive to me, unless perhaps the outlet is in a major shopping centre.

              How do you know it's the normal cost of rent?

        • Coffee only cost 20 to 30 cent if put staff and store cost it around $1.20. sell it for $4.50

          • @nikey2k27: yeah, but you need people to buy it.

        • Let's say it takes about 3 minutes per customer (on average), so a cafe can serve 20 customers in 1 hour, so about 200 customers per day (10 hrs).

          200 x $3.3 = $660 per day of profit from coffee sales, or $4620 per week (if open 7 days).

          But of course, only works in dense, city traffic with people every where. Not sure how they can with the reduced office workers and stuff in the CBD.

      • +1

        The wholesale price of a croissant is $1.50 (in Melbourne), that's a good margin!

      • +3

        If you're in Melbourne, anywhere near the northern suburbs, there's an awesome little french bakery at the Preston Markets called Publique. Croissants are genuine french style and fresh ones are baked throughout the day so you'll never get stale ones. I think they're only $2.80 each for the plain ones. Coffee is great there too.

        • I'll try it next time I am near there, thanks!

    • Second this!

  • +2

    My local substituted two packs of 8 mini croissants instead as they didnt have the large ones for my click and collect. Feel jibbed

    • I got 3 packs this morning for substitute. Is that not supposed to be?

  • +2

    Both Woolies and Coles sell butter from both Aus. and NZ, the Aus butter is about 60c more expensive for the 500g block. I'm happy to buy NZ butter tastes fine to me. It's likely the butter is from NZ as it appears to be the cheaper option.

    The best packs of croissants I have had are from Costco, they do a 12 pack for about $8-$10 and they're super delicious and fresh.

    • +2

      I think new zealand has very lax regulations on what is considered "made in new zealand"

      I think i was reading about frozen corn "made in new zealand" is actually chinese grown corn and only packaged in new zealand.

      its the reason why "made in new zealand" can be cheaper - they can substitute any foreign ingredients they want.

      • +1

        Whether a product is ‘made in New Zealand’ depends on a number of factors, including the nature of the product and what consumers understand about it. Some examples help explain how the meaning of “made” can vary depending on the product:
        *For a clothing item, where is it changed from fabric into a garment?
        *For a food item, where were the ingredients grown?
        *For a manufactured product, was it substantially manufactured in NZ? Where was the primary componentry made? Were any substantial stages of manufacture conducted offshore?
        https://comcom.govt.nz/news-and-media/media-releases/2018/re...

        • +1

          They have different labelling rules for export markets versus the domestic market. The NZ Government knows exactly what they are doing. It's not helped by the fact we waive most of our usual food safety inspection checks for agricultural goods inbound from NZ because "ANZAC spirit!"…

      • +1

        Yes, it was on TV where they said how on it says on product made in NZ, yet is not made in NZ. They just repackaged it, so I stopped buying NZ stuff. You can't be sure 100% even with all the regulations that it is it, and not that, so with their covering up, no thanks.

        • -1

          It was also on TV that drinking bleach can cure COVID. But I don't trust everything on TV.

          You can't be sure 100% even with all the regulations that it is it, and not that, so with their covering up, no thanks.

          Can't you?

          You can't be sure 100% even with all the regulations that it is it, and not that, so with their covering up, no thanks. Can't you ñ >Whether a product is ‘made in New Zealand’ depends on a number of factors, including the nature of the product and what consumers understand about it. Some examples help explain how the meaning of “made” can vary depending on the product: *For a clothing item, where is it changed from fabric into a garment? *For a food item, where were the ingredients grown? *For a manufactured product, was it substantially manufactured in NZ? Where was the primary componentry made? Were any substantial stages of manufacture conducted offshore? https://comcom.govt.nz/news-and-media/media-releases/2018/re...

          And they enforce it.

          Health supplements seller GO Healthy New Zealand Ltd has been fined $337,500 in the Auckland District Court for misleading consumers by claiming its supplements were “made in New Zealand”, when the key ingredients in the majority of its products were imported.
          https://comcom.govt.nz/news-and-media/media-releases/2019/co....

          • -1

            @spaceflight:

            It was also on TV that drinking bleach can cure COVID. But I don't trust everything on TV.

            Well, if you are going down the Trump line… it wasn't just on TV, I think Australia stopped importing NZ stuff for a while, but can't be bothered to look it up now. I know that at the time NZ was selling stuff not made in NZ. It was mentioned on Ozbargain too.

            And they enforce it.

            Sure they do… that doesn't mean companies are suddenly angels from heaven who never do any wrong. We see it all the time, they pay a fine and life goes on.

            • @bargainparker:

              I think Australia stopped importing NZ stuff for a while, but can't be bothered to look it up now

              So something the happens that you saw once is always true?

              I know that at the time NZ was selling stuff not made in NZ

              Wow really?
              Like they imported things and sold them?

              Is everything sold in Australia made in Australia?

      • They did the same thing with frozen peas a few years ago. Some of the produce from China is grown in heavily polluted fields. They could be badly contaminated with heavy metals from their factories. China has also in the past put melamine in baby food. If they are exporting dairy products via New Zealand it would be of great concern. I really hope that New Zealand gets serious about protecting their national brand as they produce some seriously good products.

        • +8

          China has also in the past put melamine in baby food

          China did not put melamine in baby food.

          A baby food manufacturer located in China did.

          • +2

            @spaceflight: Exactly, it's like saying Britain fed its people horse meat. Nestlé did that, not the British government.

          • @spaceflight: Morethanone baby food manufacturer did hence the generalisation applies

        • +1

          I wouldn't want to eat anything from China, particularly at the moment.

      • +5

        Come on - New Zealand is a mass producer of dairy products - its second biggest industry behind tourism making up 20% of GDP. Yet you think they are importing butter to resell to Australia? WTF.

    • Costco croissants are great I think they were $12 for 10 pack

    • Recently they are not removing the water correctly from the butter. Ive had this with several brands. Can you recommend one that doesnt sputter?

  • +1

    Is 72% Australian ingredients a selling point? Or a drawback? I want to know what side of the ingredient divide I should be on for the supermarket croissant bulk buy. Please help.

    • +1

      I would probably have to go with it being a positive selling point with this being 72% Australian ingredients. It's super easy and a lot cheaper to import par-baked frozen goods from EU countries like we've seen in the past on dozens of items.

  • +5

    Why add color to croissant?

    • +5

      So they are consistent colour across batches.

      Consumers are hard. These wouldn't sell as well if they were different shades of yellow in the packet.

      • Butter is different, depending on the season (if cows are eating grasses or not). And they probably go for the cheapest butter, wherever it's coming from. If the butter is a bit more white they add color to have a consistent product.
        If you're worried about a little bit of food colouring in a croissant don't buy anything from a supermarket.

        • Butter is different, depending on the season (if cows are eating grasses or not).

          That's the same for lots of ingredients.
          Even water as the mineral content can impact the finished product.

          If the butter is a bit more white they add color to have a consistent product.

          I know, that's what I said.

          If you're worried about a little bit of food colouring in a croissant don't buy anything from a supermarket.

          I'm not but thanks for your concern.

    • I know. +1 for potassium carbonate

    • Why add color to croissant?

      and why is there egg in these croissants?

  • +2

    Costs me more than this to make the same number of croissants in raw ingredients… so excluding the cost of running the oven…

    • And the hours of work to make croissants, they're such a pain in the ass.

  • +1

    Went to 6 woolies and couldn't find this anywhere. Any luck to those around Essendon?

    • +5

      the petrol you are using to save a few dollars for croissants..

      • +1

        The time is even more valuable!

  • +1

    I was wondering about the 28% foreign ingredient. Thanks to previous posters for explaining about the butter. A very key ingredient but it's great that they put so much of it.

    Now, if only I can find some instead of the yellow sign on an empty shelf.

    • +3

      Rain check if none on shelf?

  • +1

    The price for butter has gone down worldwide. This is probably how Wollies is able to offer this.

    https://www.globaldairytrade.info/en/product-results/butter/

  • I never knew/ or seen the 10 pack at WW any week.
    And going by the crappy stock level system I wouldn't trust it at all.
    Hope Coles does something similar with their 12 pack.

  • +1

    Whatever the ingredients I'll eat it!

  • +2

    So the rainchecks already back again? I thought they no longer give rainchecks since the panic buying.

    • Correct. They are still not being given out at present.

      • But at least all purchase limits are over

  • +1

    Done, crossaint with ham for the rest of the week..

  • +8

    Every time someone upvotes defrosted croissants…..a little bit of a Frenchperson's soul dies. 😜

    • +2

      Most peeps buying these kind of products don’t know how a real croissant tastes!
      Only available at REAL French bakeries using French/NZ/Danish butter or you can pass your way!

      • +3

        I'm pretty sure that you can make croissants with butter from other countries too

  • +2

    This is Ozbargain unfortunately, not OzHauteCuisine.

    I'd I'd happily take REAL French ones if they were $10 a box too.

  • +2

    The Aldi ones are the best supermarket crossiont, although they only come in 3pk. They taste better than some you get from the bakery, ie. Laurent.

  • How do these compare quality wise to the $10 12 pack cardboard tray of croissants at Coles?

    • You probably don't have any 10 pack near you anyway if you haven't seen it.
      I presume if you'd seen it would've bought and tried.
      But RRP wise the Coles works out a bit cheaper per.

  • Do people actually consume 10 before the best before date or do you freeze them / reheat them when desired (not sure if they still taste good?)?

  • Got to admit whilst these croissants are a bargain , if you guys are in Melbourne, Candied Bakery in Spotswood has some of the best croissants I have had. Literally just smashed down two (pistachio cream filled and vanilla bean filled) as I was typing this haha.

    Yes, they are slightly pricey ($5 each), but the joy of eating a freshly baked croissant with a coffee brewed from the Breville Barista Express (shout out to whoever posted on that on OzB, allowing me to get it!) is something that you can't match, regardless of how shocking my latte art is.

  • Woolworths is pulling an Aldi on this one… No stock anywhere near me. Went to two separate Woolies just for the fun of it. Both said we are waiting on ingredients.

  • The woolies near me (Riverton, WA) has loads of it…except it looks like 10 regular sized croissants in a bag). I gave it a pass.

  • No stock, no raincheck (Im told woolies not giving rainckecks yet) :(

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